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Where do you draw the line between premium and non-premium bullets

JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior MemberPosts: 8,227 Senior Member
Back in the days, there was the Nosler Partition. It was the end-all as far as performance on tough game was concerned. Some reports I read stated that it was not an accurate bullet, but it could sure put something on its butt.

Since then, bullet technology has advanced to the point that I don't even know if the partition is considered a premium bullet. So, where do you draw the line? What bullets do you consider premium, and which ones are not so?
Jerry

Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.

Replies

  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    At the grandslams which we both like and partitions

    Depending on the game if I wanted super premium with expansion and penetration it would be bear claws or A-Frames
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    I think the lines are lot more blurry than they used to be.
    I pick a bullet for the game chosen, and the distance parameters.
    Some bullets that I would consider "premium" for one animal I wouldn't for another.
    There are some bullets I would use on deer/antelope sized game that I wouldn't use for for bigger game or dangerous game
    Some bullets were not designed to be "hunting" bullets but later were realized they did a great job.
    Some guys want their bullet to exit every-time and retain 90% of its weight, where another hunter wants the bullet to adequately penetrate and then wreck the vitals.
    The Partition fulfilled both purposes to some degree--1st part of the bullet highly frangible, back part penetrate deeply
    I believe there are bullets that would be considered premium for both types, but they are truly different designs.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,046 Senior Member
    I realized last season that all my deer were shot in the head or heart at less than 100 yards. When I fired my last Win Ballistic Silvertip, I switched my load from the $1 a shot ammo to Remington core locked green and yellow box stuff. High end ammo made no sense for me at that point.

    When the AR-10 comes online and I start playing at long range, maybe I'll try some premium ammo. But not at this point
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...personally, it comes down to a good design for consistent controlled expansion for me. I'm leery of the "I was a match bullet, before I was a hunting bullet" types. I shoot lots of frangible varmint bullets, but I don't understand how a bullet decides to enter thru the mud encrusted hide & ribs of a rutting bull, then "explode" on fluffy lungs. I've got the same problem w/ hard monocores shedding their petals @ high impact velocities. Since I limit myself to shots that are normally around 400yds. or much less extreme BC's aren't that important to me, I have always been able to find a "hunting" bullet that would shoot under MOA, which is much better than I can shoot from field positions, I don't really need "match accuracy". The Speer GrandSlams & DeepCurls, Sierra HPBT GameKings have worked well for me...
  • AiredaleAiredale Banned Posts: 624 Senior Member
    Jerry,
    I think that it's a marketing thing. Bullet manufacturers have made great progress, but do average hunters really need anything other than the bullets that have sufficed for decades?
    I realize that newly developed controlled expanding bullets used on dangerous game are a breakthrough, but the old Remington Corelok or the Bronzepoint did the job on thousands of game animals.
    Bullet placement, as always, is the key.
    Any bullet, made by a reputable company, matched to the intended game will do the job.
    Jim
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Living here in Texas, a state that has a chronic shortage of elephants and cape buffalo, I'm content to rely on my trusty Game Kings and Interlocks, although I have on occasion used Speer varmint bullets. But i don't buy what most refer to as premium bullets except for a couple of match type bullets.

    Having said that and not being an elk hunter. YET! When I do go to the great white north in search of the illusive Wapity, I will break down and purchase some more formidable pills for thast purpose, although some people have told me that I could get away with using my trusty Interlocks and Game Kings or even a lowly prohunter and have success.

    Seriously, I believe you guys when you tell me a better bullet is needed to penetrate the thicker layers of hide and muscle on an elk. It's just that having only hunted whitetail and hogs, I have on the few occasions I used premium ammo had bad luck with it failing to expand. So I am reluctant to use tougher bullets, even though better judgment tells me to.

    But I will have some form of premium bullet loaded for each rifle I bring to Colorado this fall.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Airedale wrote: »
    Jerry,
    I think that it's a marketing thing. Bullet manufacturers have made great progress, but do average hunters really need anything other than the bullets that have sufficed for decades?
    I realize that newly developed controlled expanding bullets used on dangerous game are a breakthrough, but the old Remington Corelok or the Bronzepoint did the job on thousands of game animals.
    Bullet placement, as always, is the key.
    Any bullet, made by a reputable company, matched to the intended game will do the job.
    Jim

    :that:This is what keeps haunting me. It just wreaks of common sense. It's hard to argue with success, no matter what the technicle argument dictates.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    I think the lines are lot more blurry than they used to be.
    I pick a bullet for the game chosen, and the distance parameters.
    Some bullets that I would consider "premium" for one animal I wouldn't for another.
    There are some bullets I would use on deer/antelope sized game that I wouldn't use for for bigger game or dangerous game
    Some bullets were not designed to be "hunting" bullets but later were realized they did a great job.
    Some guys want their bullet to exit every-time and retain 90% of its weight, where another hunter wants the bullet to adequately penetrate and then wreck the vitals.
    The Partition fulfilled both purposes to some degree--1st part of the bullet highly frangible, back part penetrate deeply
    I believe there are bullets that would be considered premium for both types, but they are truly different designs.

    :that: And this! After reading these last two posts by Airedale and Ernie, I'm getting iffy over my bullet choices for the elk hunt. Both these guys make a lot of sense.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,648 Senior Member
    IMO you can't go wrong using a partition, but necessary for deer? Nope. Is spending $1.00 / bullet shooting at big game animals wrong ? Nope, depending are you shooting hundreds of rounds at big game? Probably not, but to sight in and hunt a couple deer or an Elk etc. each season good bullets that shoot well from your platform is $$$ well spent. Practice with less exspensive rounds to build good shooting form and increase your trigger time learning what your weapon prefers.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,975 Senior Member
    I'm with Paul, multi-section bullets, monometal bullets, and MOST bonded bullets, I consider premium. I say most, because Winchester has come out with a line of rather frangible for being bonded bullets that specifically are meant for use on whitetails, according to the box at least. I'd put the Federal Fuzion on that list too...yes it is bonded, and fairly tough (as gene has pointed out many times, and that is a wise mine for sure) but I just am not sure if I put them in the same category as Accubonds or Scirrocco II's.

    I'd still consider the Partition as a premium bullet, personally. A target bullet or varmint design type bullet used for big game? Not a premium. Yes, some advanced technology went into them, but NOT for hunting, for ballistics. It just happens to be that they can work pretty good as a hunting bullet in the right platform and intended targets.
  • joseph06joseph06 Member Posts: 133 Member
    Wasn't the Core-Lokt a "premium" bullet at one time? I seem to remember Remington had a generic "softnose" hunting bullet a long time ago.

    For me, I'll look to go above the Core-Lokt/Fusion lines if I'm planning to hunt something tough, in an area where I think I'll have to shoot long ranges, or if I'm using a light caliber for the game in question. I've never killed a deer with a handgun, but I've handgun hunted a bit and I've always gone with with Nosler's in .44 or .357 Magnum for deer, because I figure handgun bullets need all the help they can get. With a 30-06, not so much. Price and availability also play a big factor for me, I shoot a lot of Accubonds in .308 because my local Bass Pro Shops generaly always has them.
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,259 Senior Member
    100% of my hunting for the foreseeable future will be handled quite nicely with the long time favorite cup and core bullets. Winchester PowerPoint, Remington Core lock, and Nosler Ballistic tip bullets work great on the Texas white tails. And truth be told I would not be hesitant to go after Mule Deer with an accurate loading of either of these projectiles. I might step up to a 165 grain bullet for a Mule deer, but would not leave a more accurate loading of 150 grain cartridges behind.

    Step up to Elk, Moose, Black Bear, and I would prefer a premium bullet with Barnes TSX being my favorite.

    I am talking 30-06 of course.
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • AiredaleAiredale Banned Posts: 624 Senior Member
    The Remington corelok has been around forever, it's been the standby softnose bullet for years.
    I've killed a number of whitetails with my Ruger Super Blackhawk with plain old factory Remington 240 grain hollowpoints, limiting myself to 40 yards with iron sights.
    Jim
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