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Talk to me about bow hunting

BuffcoBuffco Senior MemberPosts: 6,244 Senior Member
Anyone here do it?

I have a trip lined up for a week in northern Kentucky. I've never bow hunted, but wasn't going to let a trifling thing like that stop me from going.

So, I have the local bow shop getting me all set up. Looking at a PSE Brute X. He's installing a 3 pin sight, stabilizer, peep, wrist trigger thing, quiver, and getting a middle of the line dozen carbon arrows for around $800.

My question is about broadheads and arrow weights. Do you guys (if there are any bowhunters here) use fixed broadheads or mechanical ones? Is there any sort of math I need to do to determine the best overall weights (heads, arrow) for my setup?

What else do I need to look at?

Respectfully yours,

Buffco
Governor of GA
«13

Replies

  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,463 Senior Member
    Mechanical all the way. The flight is more similar to field tips, which means you will shoot closer to how you practice. Kisser buttons are a must for new guys. Learning how to align yourself to the bow is the most important thing you will learn. Once you get that down, it is all about getting the feel for how the arrows fly, and once you got that, it is easy to put the stick where you want it....
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    What are kisser buttons?
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,146 Senior Member
    You sit in a tree stand for hours in too hot weather feeding misquotes.
    Then finally swat one and you spook all the deer in the county.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    You sit in a tree stand for hours in too hot weather feeding misquotes.
    Then finally swat one and you spook all the deer in the county.

    Hush yer mouth. I'm sure I'm gonna hate sitting there with no rifle.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I bowhunted a LOT until my worn-out shoulder joints got so sore I couldn't spend enough time practicing to shoot accurately. Practice is essential- - - -so if you start shooting a hundred shots a day right now, you'll be ready for the beginning of archery season in late August or so. I assume Kentucks's bow season starts about the same time as Tennessee's. A kisser button is an accessory woven into a bowstring that allows you to make a consistent draw. Pull the string back until the button touches the corner of your mouth every time and you'll be very consistent with your draw. Since you're using a mechanical release, just use the first knuckle of your thumb to the corner of your mouth to do the same thing. That keeps the string away from your face a little- - -less chance of ripping a lip off with the bowstring with a botched release!

    I'm not terribly impressed with a mechanical broadhead. Yes, they fly true, but there's a big possibility of one failing to open up properly on impact. The heavier the broadhead the better it will penetrate, just like a bullet, but the trajectory and maximum range will suffer with the heavier ones. I got to the point I could hit the kill zone of my styrofoam practice deer pretty consistently out to about 35 yards, but i was much more consistent at sub-25-yard ranges. The closer you can get the better, particularly if a deer has been shot at a few times. They learn to "jump the string" which means they leap for cover as soon as they hear the bowstring snap, and if you're close, you're much more likely to make a good hit. Deer gutshot with an arrow do the same thing as ones hit badly with a rifle. They run forever and you'll lose most of 'em. If you can't hit a pie plate sized area with every shot, you need more practice, or you need to get closer. Have fun!
    Jerry
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    With a properly tuned bow, fixed blades are fine.

    I'm leaning towards fixed blades. Don't like the idea of mechanicals.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Hush yer mouth. I'm sure I'm gonna hate sitting there with no rifle.

    You might hate it the first time a dandy steps out well out of bow range. But let's use frustration instead of hate. I can promise you this, you will learn more about wild game than you ever thought. With a high powered rifle, with certain limitations regarding range and skill level, if you can see it, you can kill it.
    Not so with a stick and string. Not only do they have to be close but then when they are, you have to move.
    It's a very challenging endeavor.
    I'd killed many deer with firearms of various types before I ever heard deer vocalize while bow hunting. I've got to see 'em fight even.
    Range estimation is crucial. So is shot selection.
    On the broadhead thing, to each his own. I use a heavy cut on contact Bear with the bleeder insert, I have two sets. One for practice, one for hunting. With one exception I've had full pass through penetration. And I still ate the exception.
    Practice, practice, practice. Then practice some more. The kisser button thing is to help you with a consistent anchor point. This is a huge issue. Consistency that is.
    If you hunt from a stand, then practice from a stand. Hunt from a ground blind? Then practice from that. Shoot from as many different degrees around you as you can.

    Did I mention there's no such thing as too much practice?
    Good luck but be careful, it's addictive.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,398 Senior Member
    Thanks to a "bad influence" co worker, I started dabbling last year, and got a tag for an archery only zone this year. I'm shooting my dad's circa-1984 Golden Eagle compound until I decide I like the game enough.

    I hunted my off the last two years with a rifle. Once in each year, I found myself trying to will antler points onto the only live bucks I saw - which were a spike and a probable spike (not shootable in that area) in fading light.

    Of my two days hunting in the same zone with a bow last year, I saw a very shootable forkie. . .perfectly broadside. . .at 60 yards. . .from the cab of my buddy's truck. Rifle - I'd have been able to get out and plug him. Handgun - I'd have probably tried. Bow - no chance in hell. I think the little trolls KNOW what weapon you're carrying, and take action merely to frustrate you to tears. . .

    My bad influence has used Rage expandable broadheads with success, but his "Old Reliable" is the economical fixed blade Muzzy. Figure that's still WAY more advanced than a piece of chipped flint.

    I'm taking the 125 grain points OFF the arrows this year and going to 100 grainers - and possibly carbon arrows too. I've got five sight pins on my bow, and the full range of them only gets me from 20 to just over 40 yards with about a 60 pound draw. I WANT A FLATTER TRAJECTORY! My understanding is that sufficient penetration is not a difficult thing to get with most any arrow, but having to sweat a five yard difference in range is not where I want to be.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,648 Senior Member
    Shoot as much as you can find time. You will be HOOKED, archery hunting is pursuit at it's finest -more time hunting = more enjoyment of the outdoors. Take the ball and run. As for different broadheads, WHERE your arrow hits is more important than whats on the front- as long as it penetrates. Enjoy!
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    My SIL loves bow hunting, but he's never killed any deer or hogs yet with it. I tell him that's why the indians gave em up for Winchesters 150 years ago. Seriously, I can see where people get off on it, but it's just not for me. I like Rifles.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,697 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    What are kisser buttons?

    Kisser will also help line up the peep quicker.....

    100_0988.JPG

    Keep head up. Don't lean it towards bow...
    ...

    Wear an arm gaurd. It will leave a mark. Also helps keep sleeve of hunting jacket away from string..

    photo-19.jpg
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,697 Senior Member
    I never used a bow with training wheels before......

    1.jpg

    Shooting 3D courses is fun and helps you pick a spot on game to shoot at. The 10x ring on a McKensie is not necessarily the best spot on a real deer....

    If you plan to hunt from a treestand, you need to practice from a treestand. Shooting at a downward angle is a whole different ballgame.....

    ry400-2.jpg?t=1276984490
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • U TU T Member Posts: 423 Member
    I've used 100 gr fixed (thunderhead) with good success. Properly tuned bow should shoot fixed fine, but make sure point of impact is the same as your field tips.
    Part of deciding the broadhead weight has to do with setting up the correct arrow spline, so that weight factors in determining arrow stiffness, (along with draw length and draw weight), Ask the bow shop which weight broadheads he factored in, if he's already made the arrows! (you can relate to this: You don't decide on how much gun powder to put into a load until you first pick the bullet weight!)
    I also like blazer vanes which work great, especially if you're shooting through a whisker biscuit rest, but you didn't mention which rest you'll have?
    I don't shoot a lot, but try to shoot often. Don't fatigue yourself trying to shoot as many shots as you can. I go out and shoot maybe 10 shots, then go back inside, do something else, then come back fresh, and keep doing that a few times a day.

    I would also highly recommend a tree stand of some type. I climbing stand is real nice if there are limbless trees, or portable hang ons and get plenty of tree steps. I have some ladder stands, but don't like them as much, since they are not typically high enough and I feel like i stick out like a sore thumb in one. Get a safety harness too, if you don't have one.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Using a whisker biscuit rest. Didn't want to fool with the drop aways yet.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,085 Senior Member
    I bow hunted before I rifle hunted. Used to shoot a bow a LOT, but I have not fired an arrow in probably 20 years now.

    It's fun, it's challenging, and it takes a lot of work.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,289 Senior Member
    Did you get the bow in the house yet?:jester:

    You need to practice, alot, most of the folks I know start about a month before season with a daily shooting regimen, not 100 arrows a night mind you, but shooting until they tire out. I have not gone in 20 yrs either, but the boys are showing an interest.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,463 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Using a whisker biscuit rest. Didn't want to fool with the drop aways yet.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

    Biscuits are better with gravy, drop aways are the thing to have. I don't have an expensive one, it is a rip cord. Works very well for me though....
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Biscuits are better with gravy, drop aways are the thing to have. I don't have an expensive one, it is a rip cord. Works very well for me though....

    What's the disadvantage to whisker biscuits other than a small loss in FPS?
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,463 Senior Member
    I don't want anything touching my arrows hut air and the intended target. Sure they work, but a drop away is better in every aspect.
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • AiredaleAiredale Banned Posts: 624 Senior Member
    You regard the fact that a trifling thing would stop you from loosing an arrow at a deer?
    Bow hunting takes as much or more time practicing than firearm hunting.
    What else do you need to look at? Your hunting ethics.
    A deer hit in the butt with an arrow will die, sometime.
    But that's a trifling thing.
    Try rock climbing.
    Jim
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Airedale wrote: »
    You regard the fact that a trifling thing would stop you from loosing an arrow at a deer?
    Bow hunting takes as much or more time practicing than firearm hunting.
    What else do you need to look at? Your hunting ethics.
    A deer hit in the butt with an arrow will die, sometime.
    But that's a trifling thing.
    Try rock climbing.
    Jim

    The deer thank you.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Jim,

    I've taken what you said into consideration. My cousin has shot a deer in the butt and it did die. Only like 40 yards from where it was hit. There are big arteries back there and if you nick one, they'll bleed out pretty quick. So I'm not concerned with that. Besides, compared to the overall dimension of a bullet, a broadhead is pretty big. Big and SHARP. That's gonna cut some stuff. If anything, I think accuracy is less important with an arrow than with a blunt, small piece of lead.

    And I'm not buying that bow hunting takes more time practicing than firearm hunting. Bow hunting is done from like 0-75 yards, dude. With a rifle, I'm shooting at like 400. Do you know how small a deer looks at 400 yards? Besides that, you have to train for years to get a .30-30 bullet on target at 400 yards. I've practiced holdover till I'm sick of it, but it works. Mostly.
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,463 Senior Member
    Not sweat on the way to the stand? I sweat on the way to the truck....
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • U TU T Member Posts: 423 Member
    I don't want anything touching my arrows hut air and the intended target. Sure they work, but a drop away is better in every aspect.

    Many love their drop aways, but I don't agree that they are better in "every" aspect, but are better in some aspects. Here's a couple of scenarios that I've experienced, which is why I don't like them for huntin.

    I like to sit in my tree stand with bow in my lap on it's side, and with a biscuit the arrow stays right on the rest, but with my drop away it doesn't.
    I've drawn my bow with my drop away, and the arrow has bounced/came off the rest before coming to full draw, but with biscuit it can't fall off, and bang against riser.
    I've had the chord that raises the rest, come out of adjustment and not raise the drop away rest up fully, which results in terribly wobbly inaccurate shot.
    If you draw your bow at a deer, but don't get shot off, you can let up your draw and arrow stays in place so you can redraw, but I'm betting that arrow would fallor bounce off a drop away.

    I'm sure there are better drop aways now, that might work in the above conditions, but I'm not sure? I ended up removinig a $100 drop away and have been using the biscuit. I try keeping things simple for huntin, which in my experience minimizes possible failures. If I was only shooting at targets I would use a drop away.
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,463 Senior Member
    Don't know what kind of rest you were using, but I never have those problems with mine....
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • U TU T Member Posts: 423 Member
    Don't know what kind of rest you were using, but I never have those problems with mine....

    Mine was a DMI Expert.
    What are you using? What keeps arrow in place before, during, and after drawing?
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    U T wrote: »
    Many love their drop aways, but I don't agree that they are better in "every" aspect, but are better in some aspects. Here's a couple of scenarios that I've experienced, which is why I don't like them for huntin.

    I like to sit in my tree stand with bow in my lap on it's side, and with a biscuit the arrow stays right on the rest, but with my drop away it doesn't.
    I've drawn my bow with my drop away, and the arrow has bounced/came off the rest before coming to full draw, but with biscuit it can't fall off, and bang against riser.
    I've had the chord that raises the rest, come out of adjustment and not raise the drop away rest up fully, which results in terribly wobbly inaccurate shot.
    If you draw your bow at a deer, but don't get shot off, you can let up your draw and arrow stays in place so you can redraw, but I'm betting that arrow would fallor bounce off a drop away.

    I'm sure there are better drop aways now, that might work in the above conditions, but I'm not sure? I ended up removinig a $100 drop away and have been using the biscuit. I try keeping things simple for huntin, which in my experience minimizes possible failures. If I was only shooting at targets I would use a drop away.

    I'm with George on the rest thing. However, they make a thing, and I have one, that mounts to the riser. It's rubber with a kind of clamshell end that holds the arrow on the rest. But when you draw it falls out of the way. I swear by it.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    I'm back to using my BowTech Mighty Mite bow, whisker biscuit rest, 4 pin sight (10,20,30,40 yards), and three blade 125 grain mechanical broadheads. I use a wrist trigger release. Arrows are Easton aluminum; I HATE carbon arrows. Shoulders finally back to where I can draw without pain, but bow draw weight is at 55 lb. instead of 70 lb. now.

    Practice, practice, and then practice some more. If you will be hunting from a tree stand, then that's where you need to shoot from. Makes a lot of difference in arrow impact from tree stand vs. ground; arrow impacts higher from tree stand if bow was sighted in on the ground.

    That pic jbp-ohio posted is what you need to work on as to form, too. And he's right; a bow string slapping your arm inhales vigorously! :tooth:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Jim,

    I've taken what you said into consideration. My cousin has shot a deer in the butt and it did die. Only like 40 yards from where it was hit. There are big arteries back there and if you nick one, they'll bleed out pretty quick. So I'm not concerned with that. Besides, compared to the overall dimension of a bullet, a broadhead is pretty big. Big and SHARP. That's gonna cut some stuff. If anything, I think accuracy is less important with an arrow than with a blunt, small piece of lead.

    And I'm not buying that bow hunting takes more time practicing than firearm hunting. Bow hunting is done from like 0-75 yards, dude. With a rifle, I'm shooting at like 400. Do you know how small a deer looks at 400 yards? Besides that, you have to train for years to get a .30-30 bullet on target at 400 yards. I've practiced holdover till I'm sick of it, but it works. Mostly.

    Dude this is just wrong on so many levels. I too know a guy who hit one in the ham and watched it fall. But this is an extremely low percentage shot as to be unethical.
    You came here saying you're new to the sport and wanted advice. To a man we said, "practice". But you pooh pooh that. Then you bring up a 75 yard shot at game with a bow. Please tell me you're engaging in good natured trolling.
    You need to consider the cause and manner of death. You shut down the central nervous system, (brain or upper spine shot), Shock, or blood loss. With a bow it's almost always blood loss. I've hit them in the heart with a bow and watched them fall. And I've hit them in the heart with a high powered rifle and they ran a pretty good ways at a pretty fast clip.
    And don't even get me started on 400yd with a 30/30, And before you blister me, remember you said, and I quote, "Mostly".

    In my world, "Mostly" doesn't cut it ethically.

    A nerve damage issue in my left hand has left me a very slow typist but my fervent hope is that when I click post on this that there are already 10 others who beat me to it.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    I was responding in kind to a dickish post. I did not catch the fish I was after.
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