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McMillan, Manners -- opinions?

JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior MemberPosts: 6,557 Senior Member
Wambli will attest to how many times I have posted an opinion thread like this...

My FN PBR is my baby and she needs a good stock. I am finally ready to buy one. I am looking at the Manners T4 (or T4A) or T2 (or T2A) and the McMillan A4. They are comparable to each other in price and options.

Does anyone own either they can opine on? Either way it will run in the $700 range, so price differences are not an issue here.

Bell & Carlson was a thought, too; but they do not offer drop-in stocks for the FN PBR (which has a DBM) like Manners and McMillan do.

Also, do you recommend an internally adjustable cheek-piece or something like a Karsten external cheek-piece? I do not anticipate needing to frequently adjust cheek piece height.

-Jason

Here is the Manners:

mcs-t4.jpg

Here is the McMillan:

A-4_lg.jpg

McMillan offers the external Karsten style cheek-pieces as well as internally adjustable ones. Manners only offers internal ones. But I could buy a Karsten cheek piece for the Manners.
“There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers

Replies

  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,463 Senior Member
    My limited experience with adjustable cheek pieces isn't a cure for the need to make multiple adjustments, it is the ability to make the stock fit you better.
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,871 Senior Member
    From what I have been told when I asked the same question (although in a hunting stock, but still) flip a coin, or see who can get you one first. Can't go wrong with either.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    My limited experience with adjustable cheek pieces isn't a cure for the need to make multiple adjustments, it is the ability to make the stock fit you better.

    Right, but internally adjustable cheek pieces (read: easier adjustable) have a lot of use in competition shooting (or so I understand) due to differing rifles positions needing different cheek weld heights.

    I definitely want something adjustable, just not sure which style.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,638 Senior Member
    Honestly, between the two, it's a virtual toss-up... in my experience at any rate.

    If you need that level of adjustment...I like the Karsten style cheek piece..., however, whichever one you pick is pretty much pure personal preference...
    In my experience, an Eagle Stock Pack gets the job done nicely...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,763 Senior Member
    I've got an early McMillan A4 on my .30-06 AI. It is a FANTASTIC prone stock. Not so great for anything else, but I guess that depends on what games you plan to play.

    As I tend to rest VERY low on most stocks, an adjustable cheekpiece is pretty much mandatory for me on any kind of serious precision rig. Individual mileage may vary, of course. The A4 saddle cheekpiece is coated with a layer of some kind of neoprene - the top center of which will get somewhat abraded by your cleaning rod, I can pretty much guarantee.

    The thumbscrews to lock the cheekpiece were a bit of a disappointment on both my A4 and my older McMillan Baker Special, because you really have to torque on them to ensure the cheekpiece doesn't slip downward on you. When I built my tactical .308, I ordered the thumbwheel adjustment to help prevent this.

    The Baker Special has pretty much become my go-to stock for this sort of thing, as the more conventional grip is better suited to varying shooting positions. However, if I were to build another rifle on a more prone-specific stock, I would order the McMillan A5 with the saddle cheekpiece discarded in favor of the thumbwheel type. The slanted forend of the A5 is a much more versatile sandbag rider than the square block of the A4.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    I've got an early McMillan A4 on my .30-06 AI. It is a FANTASTIC prone stock. Not so great for anything else, but I guess that depends on what games you plan to play.

    As I tend to rest VERY low on most stocks, an adjustable cheekpiece is pretty much mandatory for me on any kind of serious precision rig. Individual mileage may vary, of course. The A4 saddle cheekpiece is coated with a layer of some kind of neoprene - the top center of which will get somewhat abraded by your cleaning rod, I can pretty much guarantee.

    The thumbscrews to lock the cheekpiece were a bit of a disappointment on both my A4 and my older McMillan Baker Special, because you really have to torque on them to ensure the cheekpiece doesn't slip downward on you. When I built my tactical .308, I ordered the thumbwheel adjustment to help prevent this.

    The Baker Special has pretty much become my go-to stock for this sort of thing, as the more conventional grip is better suited to varying shooting positions. However, if I were to build another rifle on a more prone-specific stock, I would order the McMillan A5 with the saddle cheekpiece discarded in favor of the thumbwheel type. The slanted forend of the A5 is a much more versatile sandbag rider than the square block of the A4.

    Thank you, sir. These are the two points I was really looking for. I have my reservations about the Karsten style cheek rest. I tend to rest very low on stocks, too. The internally adjustable cheek rests really aren't that much more expensive.

    Thanks for the bit about riding the bags. I've never shot a squared off flat fore end on bags before.

    My primary use for this rifle will be bench/prone shooting at distance and maybe an occasional hunt or two mixed in there. If hunting, I would be doing 300-500 yard hunts and if anything closer, my .280 Rem 700 will go with me. It's really just a my baby and I want a very nice prone stock for her.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    You could just send that gun to my house and avoid all this :tooth:

    :tooth: You'd like that wouldn't you?

    I'll show you what you are missing. Put up a target in your front yard and I'll punch out a sub-MOA group in it from here!
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,796 Senior Member
    Personal experience and opinion only but, I am not a fan of saddle type cheek pieces. They don't seem to be as comfortable. That, and due to their thin nature, they seem to translate more felt recoil to your face. Seeing as there isn't substantial material to deaden the vibration.

    Were it me, I'd go with the Manners in this instance. A more solid foundation. Choose the correct ring height and an adjustable stock becomes somewhat moot. But again, just a personal observation.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
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