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Will You End Up Going Deaf????

ChuckXXChuckXX BannedPosts: 103 Member
Just curious if you have ever fired off 5 or 6 rounds from your 1911, 40 cal, or even 9mm without hearing protection. I never have but was wondering if after 5 or 6 rounds if you can hear anything or is it just lots of ringing in your ears????? Would your hearing come back eventually????

Replies

  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,721 Senior Member
    The ringing never goes away and at times it can drive one crazy. I used to shoot until my ears hurt and the cannon fire didn't help either. Nothing can bring it back, right now I'm right close to the border of getting a hearing aid. Now it's plugs and muffs.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    ChuckXX wrote: »
    Just curious if you have ever fired off 5 or 6 rounds from your 1911, 40 cal, or even 9mm without hearing protection. I never have but was wondering if after 5 or 6 rounds if you can hear anything or is it just lots of ringing in your ears????? Would your hearing come back eventually????

    1 shot from a .357 hurt my inner ears so bad, I've never gone without protection again.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,877 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Your hearing will be reduced and your ears will ring. Will it come back? Probably, but most likely you will lose a tiny amount of hearing. Its a cumulative effect.
    This^^^. I shot about 24 rounds of .357 Magnum and 50 of .38 Special out of a comped snub-nose one day. Ears range for 3 days and I still have a bit of tinnitis.
    I'm just here for snark.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Some interesting reading on hearing/loss.

    http://www.earsoftexas.com/hearingear_disorders/shooting.htm
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • TugarTugar Senior Member Posts: 2,423 Senior Member
    My hearing isn't great. Lost most of it in my left ear, so shooting combined with genetic factor like Meniere's and my left ear is almost completely useless. Can't use the phone on it, sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher.

    Wife hates it because I can put my good ear to the pillow and be almost totally deaf. Out like a light.
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.
    Winston Churchill
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    When I was 17, my shooting buddy fired his Dan Wesson .357 about 24 inches away from my left ear. I couldn't hear out of it properly for two days and I have hearing loss in that ear. I wear hearing protection now for anything loud, including the lawn mower.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I have significant hearing problems due to gunfire in confined spaces, ringing of the right ear, sirens on emergency vehicles also causes problems......
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,126 Senior Member
    Huh. what say?
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    Most of my hearing loss came from shooting a .30 Carbine Ruger Blackhawk, in the early '70's. At the time, few people used ear protection, and I figured if my dad made it through two wars without going completely deaf, the occasional shooting range or hunting noises wouldn't bother me. It was a poor decision - my ears have been ringing for 40 years.

    Still, I'm not as deaf as most shooters my age. I attribute that to the fact that I did start using ear protection after a few hundred rounds through the Ruger.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Them .30 carbines are really LOUD when fired from a handgun, even from a carbine are way over any acceptable limit. as are all firearms BTW.

    25 Mike Mike from a Bradley, 120 from a M-1 Tank, MLRS, TOW missiles being fired will really get your attention.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,258 Senior Member
    :yikes: Back when we were all 6' tall and bullet proof, the local range offered cotton balls as standard protection.

    Once the damage is done, the ears never recover. Ringing may subside and the individual may think their hearing has recovered to normal levels but it has not.

    The majority of my hearing loss is from disease, but working in my Father's machine shop, shooting, and a career around jet aircraft, and not wearing proper hearing protection especially when younger, has made things worse. As a result I have been wearing hearing ads since I was 40 years old.

    Hearing aids are exactly that - aids. They help, but cannot replace your natural hearing.

    Double up - Plugs and Muffs - of the highest DB rating you can find - 30-33 seems to be the highest available - even with that, majority of gunfire will still be in the damage zone - > 85DB

    :bang: I will retreat back to my captioned viewing of the Olympics.
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member Posts: 8,337 Senior Member
    Twentymumble years ago, I popped off a 9mm Beretta without ears on and it definitely rang my bell, but I didn't suffer any permanent loss. I do agree that it's a cumulative effect; just ask some old guy like Big Chief or Teach... :beer:
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    ChuckXX wrote: »
    Just curious if you have ever fired off 5 or 6 rounds from your 1911, 40 cal, or even 9mm without hearing protection. I never have but was wondering if after 5 or 6 rounds if you can hear anything or is it just lots of ringing in your ears????? Would your hearing come back eventually????

    Only 5 or 6 rounds outdoors? Yea, it will come back. I made a lot of bad decisions in my younger years with using hearing protection--or the lack thereof. My hearing is fine now, but the damage 20 years from now will certainly come to light.

    Shooting w/o hearing protection is something I would only advocate in an emergent self defense situation. Then factors to save your hearing like auditory exclusion comes in to play.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Shot literally thousands of rounds of rifle, pistol, and shotgun without hearing protection growing up. Didn't really start using ear protection until in the late 70s. By that time I had a good case of tinnitus. After working 25 years in nuclear plants with very high noise levels and wearing hearing protection, my hearing went even worse. Left eardrum has been ruptured twice, and hearing loss in left ear is significant.

    If a woman, child, or a man with a higher pitched voice is on my left side and speaking to me, I can't hear them very well at all. My left ear high frequency response is really bad, and the constant ringing in my ear drowns out their voice. Don't know how many times I've told a woman, "It's not that I'm not listening to you; it's just that I can't hear what you're saying". :silly: They still get mad.

    I wear hearing protection whenever shooting or around loud machinery now, even mowing the lawn or using a weedeater. And with a chain saw. And when driving a tractor; that exhaust noise is loud. Protect your hearing; you can't get it back. Bad tinnitus sucks to the max; you don't want it!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,648 Senior Member
    Anybody hunt, birds or big game with hearing protection? I never have, during a busy dove hunt with a couple of buddies 100 or so shotgun shells will be fired in the course of an evening . I only had a bad rining hunting when Dave shot at a deer right in my right ear when we were hiding behind a pasture rock thinking small thought and the deer took off running to the left which brought his barrel unnaturally close to my side 30-06 BOOM BOOM BOOM ow ow ow .
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    1965Jeff wrote: »
    Anybody hunt, birds or big game with hearing protection? I never have, during a busy dove hunt with a couple of buddies 100 or so shotgun shells will be fired in the course of an evening . I only had a bad rining hunting when Dave shot at a deer right in my right ear when we were hiding behind a pasture rock thinking small thought and the deer took off running to the left which brought his barrel unnaturally close to my side 30-06 BOOM BOOM BOOM ow ow ow .

    I dearly wish I'd had hearing protection when I hunted dove and quail way back when! The shotgun I did most of my dove and quail hunting from '63 through the '70s was a Remington 878 semiauto with a barrel shortened to 20 inches and fitted with a Cutts Compensator. That Cutts Compensator made the abbreviated barrel muzzle blast LOUD. During dove season it wasn't unusual to hunt five days a week and expend 4-5 boxes of reloads per day. I had a good deal of tinnitus by the time I graduated high school. Add in weekly trips to the skeet range during the off season shooting a minimum of 4 rounds of skeet and/or trap, and the cumulative effect was bad. In my defense, NOBODY wore hearing protection back then. If I knew then what I know now, I'd have shoved cigarette butt filters in my ears. :tooth:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Dr. dbDr. db Senior Member Posts: 1,541 Senior Member
    Most of my tinnitus came from high school gyms. We were rocking those joints.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    A Physician friend of mine wanted Me to try out his little Spanish made lupara SxS 12 gauge on some doves, gave Me a migraine I will never forget..... Good thing his medical bag was well stocked....
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • mkk41mkk41 Banned Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    Fire a few rounds indoors , especially a hot +P or magnum load in a small area and you could very well have a ruptured eardrum.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,043 Senior Member
    1965Jeff wrote: »
    Anybody hunt, birds or big game with hearing protection? I never have, during a busy dove hunt with a couple of buddies 100 or so shotgun shells will be fired in the course of an evening . I only had a bad rining hunting when Dave shot at a deer right in my right ear when we were hiding behind a pasture rock thinking small thought and the deer took off running to the left which brought his barrel unnaturally close to my side 30-06 BOOM BOOM BOOM ow ow ow .

    I do now. I wish I had my whole life. Since developing tinnitus last year, I wear electronic hearing protection while I hunt. Amplifies ambient sound, and protects my ears when it's time to put rounds downrange.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • mythaeusmythaeus Senior Member Posts: 831 Senior Member
    The simple answer is 'Yes'.

    I made a mistake of taking my hearing protectors off to talk to someone while inside an indoor range, then proceeded and fired 1 round of 223 out of my AR. I had a headache for an entire day and my ears continue to ring for a few days after. I will not make that mistake again and caution everyone I teach about that each time.

    I did some brief research a while back and wrote this up a while back:

    "I've always assumed that shotgun is louder than pistol; however, I quickly discovered it's quite the opposite. An 18" 12 gauge produces 156dB, compared to a 9mm, which rings in at nearly 160dB. A few more typical calibers:

    .32 ACP 153.5 dB
    .380 157.7 dB
    .38 Spl 156.3 dB
    .357 Mag 164.3 dB
    .45 ACP 157.0 dB

    .223, 55GR. Commercial load 18" barrel 155.5dB
    .30-30 in 20" barrel 156.0dB
    7mm Magnum in 20" barrel 157.5dB
    .308 in 24" barrel 156.2dB

    26" barrel shotgun 150.25dB

    Source: http://www.freehearingtest.com/hia_gunfirenoise.shtml)

    The pain threshold is at 120dB. OSHA Required Hearing Protection in Factory is 85dB. Sustained Exposure May Cause Hearing Loss is 90dB. A few more for good measure:

    Chest Wall Begins to Vibrate 150dB
    Ear Drum Breaks Instantly 160dB
    Death of Hearing Tissue 180dB
    Loudest Possible Sound 194dB

    Some other interesting comparison: http://www.esoundproof.com/Screens/Basics/Academy/Sound%20Measurement/Decibels/dBChart.aspx (this site lists shotguns at 120dB).

    Muzzle brakes and ports INCREASE the dB level as the sound blast is closer to the shooter."

    Ears always on!
    Al
    "In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth and have begun striving for ourselves." - Siddhartha Gautama
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    mythaeus wrote: »
    The simple answer is 'Yes'.

    I made a mistake of taking my hearing protectors off to talk to someone while inside an indoor range, then proceeded and fired 1 round of 223 out of my AR. I had a headache for an entire day and my ears continue to ring for a few days after. I will not make that mistake again and caution everyone I teach about that each time.

    I did some brief research a while back and wrote this up a while back:

    "I've always assumed that shotgun is louder than pistol; however, I quickly discovered it's quite the opposite. An 18" 12 gauge produces 156dB, compared to a 9mm, which rings in at nearly 160dB. A few more typical calibers:

    .32 ACP 153.5 dB
    .380 157.7 dB
    .38 Spl 156.3 dB
    .357 Mag 164.3 dB
    .45 ACP 157.0 dB

    .223, 55GR. Commercial load 18" barrel 155.5dB
    .30-30 in 20" barrel 156.0dB
    7mm Magnum in 20" barrel 157.5dB
    .308 in 24" barrel 156.2dB

    26" barrel shotgun 150.25dB

    Source: http://www.freehearingtest.com/hia_gunfirenoise.shtml)

    The pain threshold is at 120dB. OSHA Required Hearing Protection in Factory is 85dB. Sustained Exposure May Cause Hearing Loss is 90dB. A few more for good measure:

    Chest Wall Begins to Vibrate 150dB
    Ear Drum Breaks Instantly 160dB
    Death of Hearing Tissue 180dB
    Loudest Possible Sound 194dB

    Some other interesting comparison: http://www.esoundproof.com/Screens/Basics/Academy/Sound%20Measurement/Decibels/dBChart.aspx (this site lists shotguns at 120dB).

    Muzzle brakes and ports INCREASE the dB level as the sound blast is closer to the shooter."

    Ears always on!
    Al

    Bear in mind, too, that roughly every THREE decibels increased is actually TWICE the decibel sound level. The function is logarithmic.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • ghostsniper1ghostsniper1 Banned Posts: 2,645 Senior Member
    I posted about it on the forum before the crash, but I was about 13 or 14 and me and a buddy were shooting frogs in a pond with a .22LR. Not sure of the type of rifle except that it held 16 rounds in a springloaded tube under the barrel. We were shooting all morning and taking turns with no problems. Once again my turn, I fired at a bullfrog and got the most god awfull crack and pain ringing in my right ear only. I thought it would go away after a few days..... Nope. Parents took me to an ear specialist that determined that I lost nearly 70 -80% of my hearing in my right ear only. The weird thing is that noises like running the faucet and certain pitches really hurt to this day.
  • Dr. dbDr. db Senior Member Posts: 1,541 Senior Member
    Has any one with tinnitus used "Quietus?" supposed to be a herbal help. I don't buy the whole "all natural" = safe logic because some of the most potent poisons in the world are "all natural" but does it help?
  • banshee909banshee909 New Member Posts: 7 New Member
    Simple answer....... yes, yes you will if you continue to do it.
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,395 Senior Member
    It will not normally progressively get worse if the practice does not continue.
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • artart New Member Posts: 21 New Member
    Too much handgun hunting has really diminished my hearing....now replaced with chirps, buzzes and noises very similar to a summer night of insects.
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