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Rebarreling: cost?

JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior MemberPosts: 6,577 Senior Member
I have a Rem 700 BDL SA in .22-250. I got the rifle for a steal and put a B&C varmint stock on it. There is nothing wrong with the caliber, but I'm not keen on the caliber any longer. I have other calibers that do basically what it does and don't cost as much (to buy or reload).

Question for those who have done it...

What sort of cost am I looking at to rebarrel this to something else? It will remain common in caliber (.223, .308) unless I get froggy and decide I want to toy with 6.5 Creedmore or something like that. I realize all gunsmiths online will list general pricing, but that never seems to be a good metric.

Am I better off selling the whole shebang (less the stock) and buying new, or is rebarreling cost-effective given the ability to put on a custom barrel of my choosing? I know a lot of this decision-making is subjective, but I am looking for some opinions of the matter.
“There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
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Replies

  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,819 Senior Member
    The 22-250 has a rim diameter of .473, which is the same as many catridges like the .308, 30-06 and a multitude of others, including the 6.5 Creedmoor. This is extremely important because switching to a different cartridge while keeping the same bolt face means it's very doable and affordable. A great (ultra match type barrel) will cost less than $400, bored and rifled. A gunsmith will charge something around $100-$150 to chamber and fit the barrel. The Remington 700 is well understood by gunsmith and so for around $500 you can have your rifle in a new cartridge sporting a superb barrel. And yes, the 22-250 is such a oh-hum caliber; not as bad or effete as the .270 but there are many other calibers which are far more interesting.

    Choose wisely and have fun.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Add another vote for a re-barrel, though I'd go 260 Rem personally.
    Selling and buying a new one, you're still stuck with the crap-shoot of a factory barrel. Having a "good" barrel put on is a lot safer bet in terms of accuracy.

    Agree 100%. An action in good working order is worth it's weight in gold. It may sound like a lot of money to spen $500-650 (depending on extras like blueprinting, truing and other such treatments) to simply take one barrel off and replace it with another, but the quality of what you get and the accurizing that will be done almost always takes the existing gun to a whole new level of performance. Well worth the cost, in my book, and a process I have willingly paid for quite a few times.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    I wouldn't hesitate to call ER Shaw.
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    though I'd go 260 Rem personally.

    ...hmmm...

    That would accompany my .280 Remington nicely in variety and fun-factor...
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    What else ya got? What are your plans for the rifle? Heavy barrel? Spotter contour? Hunting? Target?

    Oh, and yes, a rebarrel with a quality barrel is a better idea than another factory rifle.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    What else ya got? What are your plans for the rifle? Heavy barrel? Spotter contour? Hunting? Target?

    Oh, and yes, a rebarrel with a quality barrel is a better idea than another factory rifle.

    Truthfully, I don't know. That determination will come with figuring out what caliber I may go with. If I choose something like 6.5 Creedmoor or .260 Rem (possibly AI) It will likely have a heavier barrel contour and be primarily a target rifle with an occasional coyote hunt.

    I would like to keep the same bolt, so it already has the .22-250 bolt face, so I am "limited" to short action calibers using that bolt face.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • bsjracingbsjracing New Member Posts: 9 New Member
    Pegasus wrote: »
    And yes, the 22-250 is such a oh-hum caliber; not as bad or effete as the .270 but there are many other calibers which are far more interesting.

    .

    Wow, a .270 slam in the first response..bravo, bravo.... :zzzz:
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    I would give McGowen Barrels a call once you make up your mind.
    Great barrel at a great price.
    It may just be capable of shooting better than you can:tooth:
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,819 Senior Member
    There are lots of great barrel companies out there, it's a question of finding what you want and dealing with the lead time that you can live with. For my latest match rifle, it was almost a tie between the barrelmaker and the action in terms of how long it took. The action took 6.5 months, the barrel took 6. The prices for a top of the line barrel will be about the same across the various companies; again it will be up to how fancy the barrel needs to be.

    For a 6.5 or a .260, you will want a topnotch barrel; for a .308 you will want the very best there is. For a .270 it doesn't matter what you get, nothing can make that caliber shoot properly.

    Aftermarket barrels will be cut or button rifled; take your pick. I prefer cut, but I also have button rifled match barrels, and they are just awesome.

    The fun part with a custome barrel is that you can specify bore, length, twist and contour, as well as the exact chambering specs you want.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    I have a Rem 700 BDL SA in .22-250. I got the rifle for a steal and put a B&C varmint stock on it. There is nothing wrong with the caliber, but I'm not keen on the caliber any longer. I have other calibers that do basically what it does and don't cost as much (to buy or reload).

    Question for those who have done it...

    What sort of cost am I looking at to rebarrel this to something else? It will remain common in caliber (.223, .308) unless I get froggy and decide I want to toy with 6.5 Creedmore or something like that. I realize all gunsmiths online will list general pricing, but that never seems to be a good metric.

    Am I better off selling the whole shebang (less the stock) and buying new, or is rebarreling cost-effective given the ability to put on a custom barrel of my choosing? I know a lot of this decision-making is subjective, but I am looking for some opinions of the matter.

    This would depend on the barrel you want and the gun smith you choose, and the rifle too can make a difference. However, if you are capable and equipped to do it yourself you can probably save a couple hundred or so.

    My gun smith will fit a barrel and true up the action and ream the chamber for about $350-$400 and that's with a Stainless Steel Shilen Match Barrel.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    Pegasus wrote: »
    The fun part with a custom barrel is that you can specify bore, length, twist and contour, as well as the exact chambering specs you want.

    This is a bit more technical than I am capable of doing the brain work for...
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    But seriously, Pegasus pegged it there. Do you want a long barrel to wring out the max velocity? Do you want a shorter easier handling barrel for stalking game in brush and woods? Do you want to shoot heavy for caliber bullets where you need faster twist or are you wanting to shoot on the lighter side with slower twist, and maybe wring out a bit more velocity? Do you want a heavier barrel with larger contour or do you want a thin Weatherby style barrel which would be light? And lastly, if you want to shoot heavier bullets, do you want to seat them out farther as to not infringe on powder space? If so, you can tell your smith when he chambers it to give it a bit more free bore. There are more possibilities when you do a custom barrel. I'm getting spoiled with these builds I've been doing because of the shots I can call.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Once you make up your mind what cartridge you want and what you want to use it for, I can help you work out the specifics.
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    This is a bit more technical than I am capable of doing the brain work for...
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • mkk41mkk41 Banned Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    Rebarreling is fairly simple and inexpensive. To go to a cartridge with a bigger head/rim dia , ya would have to replace the bolt too. A different round would also need a different magazine insert , and maybe modification to the rails.

    At least around here , there's so many bolt action rifles on the used rack , finding a donor rifle in the caliber ya want for a rebarrel and trading the caliber ya don't want would be the cheaper way to go.


    My M-40 Lite project started out with a shot out Rem 700 Varmint in .223. A simple rebarrel and parkerizing isn't gonna cost much. If the rifle was a different cal , it would be $$$.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,975 Senior Member
    I'd jump all over the 6.5 Creedmoor if I was doing this project myself. It is already a very accurate cartridge, even with factory ammo from the tests I have seen. Put that into a GOOD custom barrel, it'll probably get boring accurate.

    A 243 is always another good option as well, especially if you buy a faster twist barrel for use with the heavier target bullets. That is the other great thing about going custom, it'll be to YOUR specs. You'll never have to say "man I wish this barrel had X twist so I could shoot X weight bullets in it" like you would with a factory gun.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    snake284-1 wrote: »
    But seriously, Pegasus pegged it there. Do you want a long barrel to wring out the max velocity? Do you want a shorter easier handling barrel for stalking game in brush and woods? Do you want to shoot heavy for caliber bullets where you need faster twist or are you wanting to shoot on the lighter side with slower twist, and maybe wring out a bit more velocity? Do you want a heavier barrel with larger contour or do you want a thin Weatherby style barrel which would be light? And lastly, if you want to shoot heavier bullets, do you want to seat them out farther as to not infringe on powder space? If so, you can tell your smith when he chambers it to give it a bit more free bore. There are more possibilities when you do a custom barrel. I'm getting spoiled with these builds I've been doing because of the shots I can call.

    Barrel length: I say about 24". If I hunt it, it will be stationary coyote hunts. So, a bit more velocity is good.

    Bullet weights: I like heavy-for-caliber bullets in all my calibers. Sacrificing a bit of velocity for down-range performance.

    Barrel contour: Heavier is fine. I'm thinking tapering down to .75 or .800 at the muzzle--at the thinnest.

    Free-bore: In my .308 and .280, I like seating the bullets out farther. So I will likely do the same in this caliber.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    Barrel length: I say about 24". If I hunt it, it will be stationary coyote hunts. So, a bit more velocity is good.

    Bullet weights: I like heavy-for-caliber bullets in all my calibers. Sacrificing a bit of velocity for down-range performance.

    Barrel contour: Heavier is fine. I'm thinking tapering down to .75 or .800 at the muzzle--at the thinnest.

    Free-bore: In my .308 and .280, I like seating the bullets out farther. So I will likely do the same in this caliber.

    So there you are. You already know the beauty of a custom barrel job. And i agree with you totally because I like heavy for caliber bullets to with high BC. I too have seen the light that down range performance is more important than 100 yards. And you can have it both ways. For shooting at shorter range you just need to use a bit lighter bullet. Then you will have velocity at shorter ranges. I think a barrel like you described is the best of all worlds.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    Let's see.........

    You have a .308 and a .280 in the fold. A 6.5 is always a good choice but in this case, I think a little redundant as being close to the .308 as far as hunting and target shooting goes.

    For that reason, I'd jump all over the .243 for this rifle. I don't recall if you reload or not. Hopefully, you do. Because you can throat the chamber for the 105gr A-Max with a 1-8" twist or go crazy and get the 1-7" twist and shoot the 115gr Berger bullets.

    Either way, the .243 will allow for some target shooting, Varmint (coyote) hunting, and deer sized game all wrapped into one rifle. This, while still not stepping on the toes of your other two rifles.

    .243 / .308 / .280

    A rather nice collection, I think.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Although I am definitely a 243 Win fan and think it is a a good choice along with the 6XC, I personally don't see a 6.5x47 Lapua (or similar case capacities) or the 260 Rem being close to the 308, other than making it feel intimidated:guns:
    With the 6mm and the 115's, I would rather go with the DTAC over the Berger for distance shooting.
    For longer distances or higher winds (not for hunting) I would rather use 105 Berger Hybrid over the 115 Berger since it has a higher BC (barely) and weighs 10 grains more.
    Long story short....A good 6mm or 6.5 would be good options IMO.
    Of course I have a 308 deficiency, so that may explain some things:yikes:
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    Sometimes, you are incapable of pulling your head out of the horizon.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    I really do see the advantages of the 308 (Late) in terms of ammo availability long throat life and LR capability
    But for someone not shooting thousands of Rounds there are better options
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    I wasn't talking about the .308. Again...........my point.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Ok.
    I fail to see how a 6.5 is going to crowd a 7
    For my uses, I use 160-180 grain with 7's and 120-140 with 6.5's
    Unless you are looking for a caliber spread in and of itself, you will need to spell it out for this ole KS boy
    (-;
    Zee wrote: »
    I wasn't talking about the .308. Again...........my point.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    I've read his posts multiple times, they are vague in his intended use. So, all I have to go off of is what he presents. He wants lower cost. He wants "target" shooting. He mentioned coyotes. Don't know if he reloads, but he at least mentioned the term. He never mentioned distance. All I have to go off of is in black and white above.

    The .243 will do all those things for him and have the benefit of lower recoil as well. Give him a larger variance with what he currently owns.

    I'm all about the 6.5 and you know that. If that's what he chooses, rock on. Great choice! I'm just suggesting the .243 because of what I see above. You, are automatically looking at the horizon and what it takes to get there.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Well, uhmm, eerr, is there anything else?:that::jester:
    Zee wrote: »
    You, are automatically looking at the horizon and what it takes to get there.

    "Although I am definitely a 243 Win fan and think it is a good choice along with the 6XC."
    I agree with the 6mm as a good choice.
    Agreed on the vague part.
    The 120-130 grain class bullets in 6.5 (forget the potential for distance) are a good option.
    6.5 Creedmore (factory ammo), 260 Rem (Factory ammo), 6.5x47L (Expensive factory ammo from Lapua) or you can load all of these.

    Irregardless of distance possibilities, I think he is looking for us to give him options for a rebarrel.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    And I gave him an option. :-)
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    I gave him two!:jester:
    Zee wrote: »
    And I gave him an option. :-)
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    I do reload.

    Purpose of the rifle would be:

    -Target shooting (not likely in any open class rifle shoots, but I may configure the gun in the future for specific competitions should I decide)

    -Medium size varmint hunting (coyote, wild hog -- maybe a bobcat if I can ever find one)

    The area I varmint hunt is a raised dike along a (usually dry) marsh-like area and it is a 300-400 acre expanse (and in FL that is rare). The dike is about 10 feet above the marsh level and is covered in tall grass/weeds perfect for prone shooting from cover. So, that being what it is, my hunts would be stationary with maybe one move to a secondary location. I've packed heavy rifles before and I am capable of it without issue or bother.

    -Lastly, I would just like another accurate rifle in a caliber I haven't owned yet. I've owned a .243Winshester. So it's out. The 6mm or 6.5mm flavors out there are intriguing to me and I believe that is the caliber family I would like to explore, less the .243Win.

    I appreciate all the suggestions so far!

    -Jason
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,461 Senior Member
    .260 Remington, then.

    Same brass as your .308 Winchester.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    .260 Remington, then.

    Same brass as your .308 Winchester.

    Yep. I should have also added that I am looking in to the 6mm or 6.5mm family with the same base width as the bolt I already have in the gun (.22-250). So any short action 6mm/6.5mm caliber with a .473" base width compatibility.

    The .260 Rem is definitely in contention. So is the 6.5 Creedmoor and some of the newer 6mm flavors.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
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