What do your dove numbers look like?

JayhawkerJayhawker ModeratorPosts: 15,075 Senior Member
Doves here are thick in spite of the drought...promising a good season. I'm seeing as many Eurasian Collared Doves as Mourning Doves...Some White-Winged doves as well...Now if they will hang around til September.....
Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
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Replies

  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,658 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Doves here are thick in spite of the drought...promising a good season. I'm seeing as many Eurasian Collared Doves as Mourning Doves...Some White-Winged doves as well...Now if they will hang around til September.....

    They are thick here in East Texas, too, but I don't hunt 'em much here because there are too many water holes - shoot once and they leave. Instead, I drive 500 miles west, where you can park yourself on a bucket near a leaky windmill and shoot all day.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,560 Senior Member
    I see a lot of them every day. Unfortunately, they're in my back yard or other places inside the city limits. I think that the local constabulary would frown on me shooting them.

    Other than that, it's pretty grim around here.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,611 Senior Member
    Migration early this year? Usually it's cold weather pushing them south not hot. Local birds don't hang out in groups of 10 or more , and I have seen a bunch of birds in that big or better group.
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,737 Senior Member
    We don't get 'em this far north. I miss opening day in the California desert.
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,355 Senior Member
    Numbers here are still pretty slim. It's a few weeks early for them to be thick down here, but if it's like last year, they'll be plenty thick when the season starts.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    I see a lot of them every day. Unfortunately, they're in my back yard or other places inside the city limits. I think that the local constabulary would frown on me shooting them.

    Other than that, it's pretty grim around here.

    That sounds like a good case for a nice pellet gun...

    Right now they're thick as flies on sugar, but come September, they'll be rare as hen's teeth.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    There are plenty in town; however, I do not expect to see larger flocks until
    about Sept first, as is the norm for these parts.

    The fields in eastern NC have crops some of them in good shape, so I expect the
    doves are dispersed and the Yankee doves won't come down until later.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,658 Senior Member
    1965Jeff wrote: »
    Migration early this year? Usually it's cold weather pushing them south not hot. Local birds don't hang out in groups of 10 or more , and I have seen a bunch of birds in that big or better group.

    I'm guessing that drought may not bother them that much. The place we go to hunt in west Texas is pure prairie, and some of our best hunts were when the vegetation was virtually non-existent, due to dry conditions.

    Of course, they have a little dried up weed there that the locals call 'dove weed,' that nothing else will eat, and it seems to hang on, no matter how dry it gets.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    I'm guessing that drought may not bother them that much. The place we go to hunt in west Texas is pure prairie, and some of our best hunts were when the vegetation was virtually non-existent, due to dry conditions.

    Of course, they have a little dried up weed there that the locals call 'dove weed,' that nothing else will eat, and it seems to hang on, no matter how dry it gets.
    Don't you have a pond to hunt that may be a hot spot this year?
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • KalamazooKidKalamazooKid New Member Posts: 13 New Member
    Great ........ Cause we can't hunt them here in MI!!!!!!!!!!!
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,658 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    Don't you have a pond to hunt that may be a hot spot this year?

    Maybe, if the birds are there, this year. Where we like to go, there is so little water that the hunting is good at any water, because it is so scarce. We will cover two or three spots, with about ten people, and chase the birds back and forth between them.

    Locally (East Texas), ponds are good places, if there are huge numbers of birds. But there are so many ponds around here that the birds move on, once shot into. So, unless there are enough birds that you have continuous supply of 'un-indoctrinated' birds, the hunting is not that good. I don't think I've ever got a limit, locally.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    Great ........ Cause we can't hunt them here in MI!!!!!!!!!!!
    Was that way when I lived in Wis, birds got shot when they went to Ill.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,075 Senior Member
    Great ........ Cause we can't hunt them here in MI!!!!!!!!!!!

    Just ONE of the reasons I no longer live in Michigan.... "Song Bird" my asymmetrical saggin butt...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,075 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Numbers here are still pretty slim. It's a few weeks early for them to be thick down here, but if it's like last year, they'll be plenty thick when the season starts.

    Back when I lived in Utah, we would often get out on the high desert and walk them up like quail...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    They are pretty thin numbers here right now. Migration hasn't started so all we have are the ones that were here for raising off a hatch. Probably won't be a lot during hunting season, though. Most of the corn and soybeans were burned up during the growing season because of no rain. The migrating ones best pack a box lunch for traveling across TN on their way South.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • ghostsniper1ghostsniper1 Banned Posts: 2,645 Senior Member
    They seem to have dwindled in numbers as of here lately. I used to shoot them with a pellet gun as a kid, but gotta admit I never ate one. How is the meat?
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,658 Senior Member
    Tastes like chicken. :tooth:

    Actually, you will get a lot of different opinions on that. Some folks say it tastes like quail, but with a slight livery tinge. I've never thought so, myself, but then I like liver. I soak mine in salt water for a couple days (in the refrigerator) and then grill it with onion and jalapeno slices between two breasts, and wrap it in bacon and skewer several on a stick. Tastes great to me.

    CookDoves.jpg
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,355 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Back when I lived in Utah, we would often get out on the high desert and walk them up like quail...

    I believe it. The ones in city parks here will let you get close if they haven't been harassed, but by the time hunting season rolls in, within a day they've been pressured so badly there's no way we can walk up to them anymore. You have to wait for the morning/evening moves unless you know a really remote spot in the high desert, preferably with a water source.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,355 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    Tastes like chicken. :tooth:

    Actually, you will get a lot of different opinions on that. Some folks say it tastes like quail, but with a slight livery tinge. I've never thought so, myself, but then I like liver. I soak mine in salt water for a couple days (in the refrigerator) and then grill it with onion and jalapeno slices between two breasts, and wrap it in bacon and skewer several on a stick. Tastes great to me.

    I agree with the slight liver/duck/dark meaty description if you take the meat straight up. It's not like quail to my palate. Quail does indeed taste like just about any other white meat bird to me: chicken, pheasant, parakeet, etc.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    I never ate one. How is the meat?
    Taste like pigeon to me.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,075 Senior Member
    How is the meat?
    Similar to Spotted Owl
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    Tastes like chicken. :tooth:

    Actually, you will get a lot of different opinions on that. Some folks say it tastes like quail, but with a slight livery tinge. I've never thought so, myself, but then I like liver. I soak mine in salt water for a couple days (in the refrigerator) and then grill it with onion and jalapeno slices between two breasts, and wrap it in bacon and skewer several on a stick. Tastes great to me.

    CookDoves.jpg

    Bisley that's the prefered cooking method around here too. However, I can't shake the thought of how good they were when my mother used to fry them. I love fried dove.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I agree with the slight liver/duck/dark meaty description if you take the meat straight up. It's not like quail to my palate. Quail does indeed taste like just about any other white meat bird to me: chicken, pheasant, parakeet, etc.

    Parakeet??? Surely you Jest!!! Is it really a white meat bird or are you kidding? I've never even thought of eating one.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,355 Senior Member
    snake284-1 wrote: »
    Parakeet??? Surely you Jest!!! Is it really a white meat bird or are you kidding? I've never even thought of eating one.

    I was just kidding.








    (not enough meat on 'em) :jester:
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,697 Senior Member
    That's one of the things that I miss about Texas. When I lived near Fort Worth, I was close to great quail and dove hunting and some pretty decent duck hunting. Now in Alabama I have great deer hunting but few doves, no quail, and only wood ducks. I used to dove hunt near Granbury and we used to sit in lawn chairs next to our trucks. We would make bets on who could drop one closest to your truck. If you could drop one in the bed, everyone had to pay you double and if you could pick one up from your chair, they had to pay you triple. And Bisley's method of grilling them wrapped in bacon with onion and jalapeno was pretty standard. They really don't taste very good without some doctoring.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,327 Senior Member
    The dove have been thick here all year so far. Quite a few dairies in the area and a lot of farmers growing grain and feed for the dairies have had the dove going nuts. We pretty much have dove here year round. I've gotta start doing some scouting to see what I can find for hunting areas.
  • rapier5316rapier5316 Member Posts: 312 Member
    They seem pretty slim around here this year. With the run off creek becomeing spring fed on the next section east, the wires are a handy waiting perch for them on their approach to the water. Not very many around the scorched earth of COlorado.
    "The power of the United States has peaked, oppression follows." Robert Prector, Socionomics.net
  • gatorgator Senior Member Posts: 1,689 Senior Member
    Looking pretty good here in the southwest,saw about 500 of them all lined up on a powerline the other morning.

    Haven't been out to my favorite water hole yet to see if they are flying there,it has been kinda hit and miss the last couple years.
    USMC 80-84
    -96 lbs
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    Base game warden called me today and said there are 100's of doves in the Base dove field.
    He was able to grow a good crop and has been mowing a little for a couple of weeks.

    With all the rain we have had recently the local farmers won't be able to get in their fields,
    besides the corn will be wet anyway. So it is looking good for the season on 1 Sept.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,658 Senior Member
    Interesting information - thank you.
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