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Jewell Triggers

Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior MemberPosts: 8,496 Senior Member
Just ordered a Jewell Trigger for my 6.5x47L rifle.
Had a hard time finding a LH version with bolt stop.
Ended up calling Jewell and ordering from them.
Ernie

"The Un-Tactical"

Replies

  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Just ordered a Jewell Trigger for my 6.5x47L rifle.
    Had a hard time finding a LH version with bolt stop.
    Ended up calling Jewell and ordering from them.

    What's the pull weight range on the one you ordered?
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    1.5 ounces to 3 pounds
    Something like that.
    I will run it at 1 pound-maybe lighter
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,464 Senior Member
    I have one and it's an awesome bench trigger! Not a good field or work trigger, though.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Agreed on both comments.
    I would use a Timney if, I needed a SERIOUS field trigger.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,464 Senior Member
    My friend even had one freeze (literally) on him and fail to fire at the range while we were shooting. It was 20 degrees.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Was lube in the trigger mechanism?
    Zee wrote: »
    My friend even had one freeze (literally) on him and fail to fire at the range while we were shooting. It was 20 degrees.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,464 Senior Member
    I asked him that myself. He didn't put any in there, but apparently SOMETHING got in there that could freeze. He knows better than to lube one. So, maybe solvent, oil, lube, or whatever got in there and gummed up in the low temp.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,749 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I asked him that myself. He didn't put any in there, but apparently SOMETHING got in there that could freeze. He knows better than to lube one. So, maybe solvent, oil, lube, or whatever got in there and gummed up in the low temp.

    Doesn't take much to freeze up a bolt. Scooter and I were elk hunting a few years back, and opening morning it was -26F. I knew it was going to be cold, so I'd completely degreased the bolt and receiver with CRC Brakleen. That stuff leaves no residue. I thought I'd gotten all the lube out, and in fact would have sworn on a stack of anything you wanted that I had.

    Nope. Went to unload that evening back at the truck, and my bolt was frozen solid. Took about five minutes of hand-warmth before I could unchamber the round. I don't know if it would have broken free upon firing (I'm assuming it probably would have), but it sure gave me cause for pause.

    Like I said.....it don't take much.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    1.5 ounces to 3 pounds
    Something like that.
    I will run it at 1 pound-maybe lighter

    Wow! That's cool as cool gets. Congrats!
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    They are without a doubt my favorite trigger.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,258 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    My friend even had one freeze (literally) on him and fail to fire at the range while we were shooting. It was 20 degrees.

    1St complaint I have ever heard about a Jewell trigger!
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    Sort of depends what type of shooters you are dealing with and the kind of conditions they shoot in.
    For a "work gun" I wouldn't use one as much as I hate to say that. Reliabilty is King!
    41magnut wrote: »
    1St complaint I have ever heard about a Jewell trigger!
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,464 Senior Member
    41magnut wrote: »
    1St complaint I have ever heard about a Jewell trigger!

    Don't get me wrong. I love them. They are an excellent bench trigger. They are not, however, a working gun trigger.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Some of my friends who were into skeet shooting several years ago had their shotguns converted to "release" triggers. They were shooting mostly Remington 870's, and the procedure was to step up to the firing line, squeeze the trigger, rack a shell into the chamber from the magazine and call "pull". The gun fired when the trigger was released during the swing on the clay bird. Obviously, the only place those guns were used was on the skeet range, as they would try to slamfire if a shell was chambered without the trigger pulled back. I don't know what the perceived advantage to that setup was, but a lot of the guys at the local skeet club had guns set up that way.
    Jerry
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,118 Senior Member
    Jerry, an old time Skeet/Trap shooter once told me that they were originally made to help shooters cure a flinching problem....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,464 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    That 3 shot group with my friends .308 was done with a Jewell. I had just finished shooting the Mauser (about a 5 lb 2 stage) and I sat down with the Rem 700 with the Jewell. Thank GOD I set my crosshairs on target BEFORE I put my finger on the trigger because I DO NOT remember actually pulling on that thing...

    When switching guns on the range, I always dry fire the new rifle a few times. Just to reset my brain to the different trigger.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    When switching guns on the range, I always dry fire the new rifle a few times. Just to reset my brain to the different trigger.

    Me too. If not, if I shoot for group, the first shot is usually a flier.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
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