Home Main Category Clubhouse

pickling meats...recipes?

bklysenbklysen Posts: 525 Senior Member
I've not done this before, but I have a variety of wild game that I'd like to try it on. Mostly larger cuts, but a lot of smaller trimming type pieces available, too. Teach's recipe for pickled eggs a while back got me to thinking about this. So I just gotta try.

Anyway, are there any obvious do's or dont's for meats that I should be aware of? Do most recipes that work well with veggies (or eggs) also work well with meats?

I can Google til the cows come home, but you guys & gals always have more interesting input than anything out in those interweb places...:tooth:

Replies

  • bmlbml Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    Do you have a pressure canner?
  • bklysenbklysen Posts: 525 Senior Member
    I've got a stove-top pressure cooker, is that the same thing?
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    bklysen wrote: »
    I've got a stove-top pressure cooker, is that the same thing?

    Not at all! A pressure canner will have a gauge, rocker, and pressure relief valve(s) on the lid.

    I have only pickled meats utilizing the pressure canning process.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • TeachTeach Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    The main method of preserving any type of meat is salting, smoking, freezing, or canning. Pickling is a slightly modified form of canning where a brine solution is added to the meat before it's pressure-canned. Pressurizing canned goods has two main functions- - - -sterilizing and sealing against outside contaminants.

    Canned meats MUST have very long canning times, to assure the meat gets heated to sterilizing temperature throughout. Here's where pressure comes in- - - -every pound of pressure raises the boiling point of water 3 degrees, so a 15-lb. pressure canner cooks the food inside at 212 degrees plus 45 degrees- - - -257 degrees at sea level, slightly less as the altitude goes up. Most meat canning involves at least an hour under pressure for pint jars, longer for quarts. The brine that's used in the pickling process also helps sterilize, buit it's mostly a preservative.

    USE ONLY CLEAN, BLEMISH-FREE CANNING JARS! A MAYONNAISE JAR WON'T TAKE THE PRESSURE!

    Sealing- - - -an added advantage of pressure canning. As the liquid inside the jar boils, it forces any air that's trapped inside the jar past the soft rubber seal in the lid. Once the jar cools, a vacuum is formed that seals the lid down tight and will keep the canned goods sterile and edible for around a year. After one year, canned goods should be consumed or discarded. That's also true for most commercially-canned food, so if you stockpile emergency canned food for a S H T F scenario, rotate the older stuff out on a yearly basis and replace it with fresh stock.

    Yeah, I've had some of those military C-rations with a "use by" date 10 years or more past its prime. It didn't kill me, but the taste was pretty awful a lot of the time! Of course, the 1-year-old stuff wasn't a whole lot better! Pray for peaches and pound cake! The SEA vets can probably appreciate that comment!
    Jerry
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    A stovetop pressure cooker is essentially the same as a pressure canner just smaller. I've got a Mirro pressure cooker that was about 60 bucks and I've got a lot of use out of it. I believe it holds about seven quarts at a time. I got interested in canning meats a while back also and I think the thread about it disappeared during the last forum crash. I seem to recall Wambli giving some easy recipes for canning venison. The one that I remembered was for pressure cooking venison shank and making them edible. We've always tossed the shanks as all the sinew and tendon is too much of a pain to deal with and I learned that when pressure cooked, the sinew disolves and the meat is edible. I roll at least six deer a year and that was a lot of shanks thrown away. I've been on a canning tear this year and have put up pickled eggs, (Jerry's recipe) butter beans, marlin, bonita, and pickles. Our deer season started a couple of weeks ago and I plan to can a good bit of venison this year also.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Posts: 14,103 Senior Member
    Bonita? As in the fish? Tell me, how do you prepare it?
    Meh.
  • bklysenbklysen Posts: 525 Senior Member
    Fish....

    If you get around to doing some venison with what sounds like similar equipment to mine (6 Qt, rocker, no gauge), please let us know how it goes. I'd love to hear more. :up:
  • TeachTeach Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Here's a recipie for a cold pickling solution I found on the internet- - -dating back to the yankee invasion days. It uses sugar, salt, and spices, plus a small quantity of saltpeter. Given that stuff's reputation, I don't know if I'd want to include it in the mix! Once the meat is pickled, then it can be sealed in canning jars for storage. I think I'd still want to do a pressure-processing procedure in addition to the pickling!

    http://pattyinglishms.hubpages.com/hub/How-To-Pickle-Meat

    Jerry
  • JermanatorJermanator Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    Canned venison rocks! When you pressure can it, all of that tough connective tissue converts to gelatin. To give you guys an idea of the texture, think of the hunks of beef in a can of Dinty Moore Stew. It comes out like that. I also do beef chuck roasts, and any other tough cuts of meat that way-- not canning it, but pressure cooking it. You can take any super tough hunk of meat straight from the freezer, brown it in a skillet to get a bit of the caramelization flavor, and put it in the pressure cooker along with a chopped onion or two, maybe some mushrooms, salt, pepper, maybe some flat beer (if not, use water-- or both) and cook it for 90 minutes. That roast will be fork tender and the juice makes perfect gravy.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • bklysenbklysen Posts: 525 Senior Member
    Thanks guys!

    I can see opportunities to get a little creative.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    Canned venison rocks! When you pressure can it, all of that tough connective tissue converts to gelatin. To give you guys an idea of the texture, think of the hunks of beef in a can of Dinty Moore Stew. It comes out like that. I also do beef chuck roasts, and any other tough cuts of meat that way-- not canning it, but pressure cooking it. You can take any super tough hunk of meat straight from the freezer, brown it in a skillet to get a bit of the caramelization flavor, and put it in the pressure cooker along with a chopped onion or two, maybe some mushrooms, salt, pepper, maybe some flat beer (if not, use water-- or both) and cook it for 90 minutes. That roast will be fork tender and the juice makes perfect gravy.


    Right along with all that Jerm is fish with a lot of small bones. If you pressure cook Carp and Buffalo and such, the bones will soften and you eat the whole thing, just like canned salmon from the store. I want to try this someday with Milk Fish, called Bangus in the Philippines. they have like 80 someting bones and are a pain. However, they are quite tasty except for the bones. Some Filipions can take every bone out and then they smoke them or fry them. This is a neat breakfast. But I want to try pressure cooking some.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    Bonita? As in the fish? Tell me, how do you prepare it?


    The recipe was given to me about 25 years ago and I tried it for the first time just last year and was amazed! You start with fresh bonita and you filet it and remove every trace of the lateral line. (dark purple stuff) Cut the fish into strips no more than 1-1/2" wide and 1" shorter than a pint jar. (pint jars were recommended) Let the fish sit in ice water while you're cutting it all. Place the fish into sterilized jars being careful not to pack it too tightly and add 1/2 teaspoon of sugar and 1/2 teaspoon of non-iodized salt to each jar and fill the jars with tap water just enough to cover the fish with about 1/4" of water. Seal the jars and follow the directions for your cooker. Process the jars at 10psi for one hour and twenty minutes. You have to keep 10psi at all times to kill bacteria and going over 10psi will boil the liquid out of the jars.
    I was given a jar of bonita with the recipe and I had it in the cabinets for at least five years when I took it out to throw it away. I decided to at least taste it and it was so good that I ate the whole jar full. Over the years I've tried bonita in every possible way and it always tasted awful but I found that canned, it's actually really good. I eat two or three cans of tuna a week but since I started canning bonita, I've never bought another can of tuna. All the people that I've given some to think I'm lying and it's not really bonita. I've tried the same recipe on marlin and king mackeral and they taste fine but I think the bonita tastes the best done this way and it's cheap and abundant.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • TeachTeach Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Anyone who wants to get into home canning in a serious way should consider getting a big pressure canning pot. The good ones are heavy cast aluminum, and the lid is secured with several wing nuts. They also seal without any type of gasket, just a gradual metal-to-metal taper between the lid and the pot. These things never wear out- - - -ours is well over 50 years old, and still going strong! Watch estate sales, flea markets, and other used equipment sources, and you can acquire an "experienced" canner pretty reasonably. My 80-something parents have a big one that I'm planning to see if they'd be willing to donate, since they haven't used it in quite a while, so we should have heirlooms from both sides of the family soon. Today on ebay, there are over 700 listings of pressure canners, new and used.

    The older canners just have a pressure gauge and an overpressure pop-off valve, and the temperature/pressure has to be controlled by varying the heat under them. It's easy to retro-fit one of the later design "wobbler" pressure valves- - - -just drill and tap a thread into the lid for a pressure control such as Mirro-Matic or Presto cookers use, with 5-10-15 PSI settings. Those parts are also available on Ebay at pretty reasonable prices.

    Another sneaky trick- - - - -A Coleman gasoline camp stove (not Propane) gets much hotter than a natural gas or Propane kitchen range, so the canner will come to pressure much quicker when it's used on the gasoline stove out on the back porch or patio- - - - -which also keeps the kicthen cooler! Several years ago, Mary and I were canning up about 2 bushels of green beans we had bought at a local farmers' market. My canner, on the camp stove was getting nearly a 2-to-1 advantage over hers, on the Propane kitchen range, just from quicker heat-up time between batches.
    Jerry
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement