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How do you like your rice ?

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  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I really like Japanese rice with black beans & pork chops.

    I used to frequent a Japanese restaurant that served that exact dish ! not even expensive. :drool2:

    Rice & fried plantains & some sort of beans, with Mexican spices, maybe chilles rellenos.....
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member North DakotaPosts: 2,985 Senior Member
    plane white rice fluffy but like fried rice and also red beans and rice.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member East TexasPosts: 10,815 Senior Member
    That is almost exactly how I've seen Mrs. Bisley cook it. It is very good.
  • bruchibruchi Senior Member Posts: 2,581 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm so sad my PR friend has lost his way. I like rice the way my grandma used to make it. First you wash the rice to get rid of all the powder it gets from grinding on itself in transportation. THAT powder is what makes for clumpy rice. Rinse until water runs clear and drain.

    Then you take about 2 square inches of pork fatback and score the fat down to the skin in a waffle pattern. Then you throw that into the caldero and fry it on relatively low heat until the fat has been rendered and it's crispy (bacon fat also works as well but gives the rice a different taste, GOOD but different). You then add two cups of rice and stir into the pork fat until it's coverd all this at pretty high heat, leave the piece of fatback in the pot. You then add 4+ cups of water and salt (about 1/4 teaspoon per cup of liquid some like more, others less). Then you stir briefly and cook uncovered at high heat until water evaporates down to the rice. Lower heat to low, fluff rice with a metal fork and cover and cook for another 15 minutes or until rice is not crunchy anymore. Sometimes some of the rice burns a little on the bottom and sticks to the pot. That is called "pegao" and in my house we used to fight over it. it's cruchy and flavorfull with a nice nutty flavor!!!! For the health conscious use olive or corn oil instead of fatback but it'll NEVER be the same...

    Serve on a plate with a healthy helping of red beans on top and the meat of your choice, deep fried seasoned porkchops is one of mine, with fried sweet ripe plantains... YUMMMMMMMMM :tooth:

    Well that is exactly how I learned to make white rice from grandma and have done it most of my life, 'TOCINO" the fat you render after cutting in a waffle pattern is a gift from the gods !

    Try throwing in there a cube of bullion, make sure to dissolve it well before.

    I tented a room from a Korean family many years ago in LA and there where giant rice cookers loaded 24/7 and part of the lodging, ate a lot of it and got addicted to it, also lost my taste for pegao.

    As a poor defense I make my white rice "oriental like" but the mixed rices get homemade sofrito, pimientos morrones, olives, bacon fat, chorizo and sometimes a link of longaniza thrown in there, if you ever try my "arroz con salchichas" or "arroz con calamares" you would immediately forgive my adoption of the clumpy oriental white rice.

    Next time you want to "upgrade" your white rice, throw it when just ready on a large bowl, add chopped cilantrillo, cebollines and good olive oil, mix and enjoy!
    If this post is non welcomed, I can always give you a recipe for making "tostones".
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    "I tented a room from a Korean family many years ago in LA and there where giant rice cookers loaded 24/7 and part of the lodging, ate a lot of it and got addicted to it, also lost my taste for pegao."

    Just as well, as you get older, the risk of breaking teeth on that stuff is higher anyway......
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    I prefer the boil in the bag minute rice. I'm not hard to please.
  • calebibcalebib Senior Member ColoradoPosts: 1,701 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm so sad my PR friend has lost his way. I like rice the way my grandma used to make it. First you wash the rice to get rid of all the powder it gets from grinding on itself in transportation. THAT powder is what makes for clumpy rice. Rinse until water runs clear and drain.

    Then you take about 2 square inches of pork fatback and score the fat down to the skin in a waffle pattern. Then you throw that into the caldero and fry it on relatively low heat until the fat has been rendered and it's crispy (bacon fat also works as well but gives the rice a different taste, GOOD but different). You then add two cups of rice and stir into the pork fat until it's coverd all this at pretty high heat, leave the piece of fatback in the pot. You then add 4+ cups of water and salt (about 1/4 teaspoon per cup of liquid some like more, others less). Then you stir briefly and cook uncovered at high heat until water evaporates down to the rice. Lower heat to low, fluff rice with a metal fork and cover and cook for another 15 minutes or until rice is not crunchy anymore. Sometimes some of the rice burns a little on the bottom and sticks to the pot. That is called "pegao" and in my house we used to fight over it. it's cruchy and flavorfull with a nice nutty flavor!!!! For the health conscious use olive or corn oil instead of fatback but it'll NEVER be the same...

    Serve on a plate with a healthy helping of red beans on top and the meat of your choice, deep fried seasoned porkchops is one of mine, with fried sweet ripe plantains... YUMMMMMMMMM :tooth:

    My mother in law made something similar the other day except she added mushrooms as well, those Venezuelans love their mushrooms! Coincidentally, my father in law started the first commercial mushroom farm in Venezuela in the early 70s.

    I love most any "ethnic" rice dish; arroz con pool, arroz con leche, biryani, etc.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Under a logPosts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Hard question to answer, really. I like dirty rice, I like rice in the gumbo, I like non clumping wild rice with game birds and small game. I like clumpy rice like in rice pudding with LOTS of raisins in it, and some chopped pecans or black walnuts or hickory nut chips. I HATE white rice, clumpy or not, as a side dish; if rice is a side, I want it to be wild rice. White rice by itself triggers a gag reflex. :vomit:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
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  • calebibcalebib Senior Member ColoradoPosts: 1,701 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Yes they do! They just opened up a new Venezuelan place close to my office in Miami and one of the folks that works for me is Venezuelan and promised to take me there for lunch next time I'm in town. Man I miss my arepas con natilla with my coffee in the morning!!! :tooth:

    BTW does your wife know how to make Natilla? If she does can I have the recipe? All my friends inmediately think of the /SpanishColombian sweet custard instead of the Venezuelan version which is more like a sour cream kinda taste.

    I'll ask her, if not I'm sure her mom knows. She's an awesome cook.
  • bruchibruchi Senior Member Posts: 2,581 Senior Member
    You will need for the "Arroz con Calamares" this"

    base:
    1/4 cup bacon fat, olive oil will do in a pinch but WHY?
    1 link of Spanish chorizo, diced as well
    1 link of longazina, take the skin off

    "instant sofrito"
    bunch of cilantrillo
    1 very large yellow onion diced small
    3 large cubanele peppers diced as well
    1 cup of sweet peppers diced no seeds
    I head of garlic, grinded
    4-5 culantro leaves (also called recao)

    seasonings:
    salt
    pepper
    cumin
    paprika
    1/4 cup (or more) of olives, best option the pitted ones with pimento inside and capers, no liquid.
    diced large Spanish "picked red peppers", about 1 cup and the liquid they come in, here we call them "pimientos morrones"

    4 cups of medium gran rice and whatever you are mixing it with.

    This time we use calamares but the same recipes works for chicken, vienna sausage with all the liquid in the can, shrimp, corn, chick peas, a combo of stuff, etc. if you use canned octopus use only about a quarter of the oil they come in!

    if you are making "arroz con gandules" (pidgeon peas) you must add chunks of pork meat to the base, grind one plantain and add with the gandules plus covering the rice with a clean plantain leaf as well as the pot's lid adds a lot of flavor!

    1 small can of V8 and beer at room temperature as the liquid....

    Put large pan with tight cover on medium heat, add the bacon fat and when hot add the chorizo and longaniza, break them up with a metal spoon and let render in the fat, few minutes later add the "sofrito" ingredients and let them just cook a tiny bit, add a can of V8, there goes my secret!

    Now add the calamares with all the ink that comes in the cans, if you use fresh calamares add the ink from the pouches, add the seasonings including the olives, set the heat to high and when it starts to boil add the rice and enough beer to cover everything, stock works too, never mind how many cups, the liquid simply must just cover the rest of the stuff, once this is done, mix everything and this is something you ONLY will do twice, messing with your rice while it cooks is asking for a disaster so this is the first time out the 2.

    Let it cook at a "slow" boil uncovered and in about 20-30 minutes when all the liquid is "gone" but before anything gets stuck to the bottom of the pot you can go ahead and mix again, actually the trick here is to move all the rice at the bottom which should be a bit damp to the top and viceversa, after that you cover it, set the heat to low and forget about it, don't go peeking in there for some 20 minutes, when the rice at top is cooked properly is ready!

    Some folks here prefer to make "sofrito" in large batches, simply liquify in blender all the "sofrito" ingredients, maybe you heed a bit of water there and save in the freezer to use as needed, one neat trick is to freeze the "sofrito" in ice cube trays and when hard save in a ziplock bag to use the cubes as needed, if I have sofrito, mom's was great... I still add all the sofrito ingredients as described here but a smaller amount when I add the can of V8, premade "sofrito" adds a lot of flavor but the freshly cut stuff adds a nice texture.

    Wambli I am sure you know a lot of this stuff already but I am trying to make it friendly for the non Puertorrican members.
    If this post is non welcomed, I can always give you a recipe for making "tostones".
  • BullgatorBullgator Member Central FloridaPosts: 393 Member
    Non-clumping (Himalayan Basmati) for almost everything. I also keep a US grown version of sushi rice for risotto and sushi.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    calebib wrote: »
    My mother in law made something similar the other day except she added mushrooms as well, those Venezuelans love their mushrooms! Coincidentally, my father in law started the first commercial mushroom farm in Venezuela in the early 70s.

    I love most any "ethnic" rice dish; arroz con pool, arroz con leche, biryani, etc.

    What is "arroz con pool" ?????
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • SlanteyedshootistSlanteyedshootist Senior Member Corvallis, OregonPosts: 3,947 Senior Member
    Any of you had mochi or manju? Basically smashed rice made into little pastries. Or Chinese rice cake? Better than candy any day.
    The answer to 1984 is 1776
  • calebibcalebib Senior Member ColoradoPosts: 1,701 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    What is "arroz con pool" ?????

    Pollo. Damned auto correct.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Ohhhhh, I almost fried My brain trying to figure that out.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
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