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Who here has to hunt with special restrictions?

timctimc Senior MemberPosts: 6,684 Senior Member
The county I hunt in here in Texas has had special antler restrictions for the last couple of years. I am all for it because it improves the overall quality of the deer in our area but it can also be very frustrating too. I just had to let walk a big bodied 8 point buck because he looked to be a little shy of the 13" minimum inside spread. Right now I'm looking for meat and don't really care a out horns so that is the frustrating side. Another teeth grinder is all the does I am seeing are too small to shoot.
All I want is one big doe and my world will be right again!
:bang:
timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
AKA: Former Founding Member
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Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    No size or point restrictions here in Tennessee- - - -just a max nunber of bucks. The season runs from late September (archery) through smokepole and centerfire, ending about the first week in January. During that time, the doe quota is almost unlimited (3 a day) but only three bucks can be taken all for all the seasons. If I score 3 bucks (horns over 3" tall) with a bow, I'm done buck hunting for the year. I can still take close to 100 "antlerless" animals, does, or button bucks, or short-horned animals that resemble does. No problems with mis-identifying a young buck as a doe that way. The idea is to control the massive overpopulation by limiting the bucks' breeding opportunities. It seems to be working.

    Young, tender "suitcase" deer, the ones where we tie the hooves together and pack 'em out of the woods like a suitcase, make excellent BBQ fare!
    Jerry
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Spike elk can be frustrating sometimes.....
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    My county has the 13" rule. It has not been a problem for me till this year. I let a couple of marginal bucks walk, early in the season, because I've been used to seeing bigger ones. But it hasn't happened for me this year, and as usual, no does presented themselves during the 4 day doe season. Here, there are still plenty of acorns, so they don't spend much time in open areas. I'm hoping the later part of the season might be good this year.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,810 Senior Member
    We used to have them at the Air Station
    then too many aircraft hit deer
    on roll out during a night landing.

    Now if it is brown and not a dog it is down.
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,684 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    We used to have them at the Air Station
    then too many aircraft hit deer
    on roll out during a night landing.

    Now if it is brown and not a dog it is down.


    That was how we had it for many years. We had good game management but a lot of the surrounding ranches did not. Over hunting small areas that could not support large numbers of deer being taken really hurt our hunting. I can say we are now seeing more and better deer in just a couple of years with these restrictions. I'm sure I'll find a nice doe or spike for sausage meat before the season is over.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,810 Senior Member
    Well, there seems not to be any shortage of deer on the Base
    because there is quite a list on the "I got one board".

    A friend of mine has shot 5.
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,720 Senior Member
    My wife, otherwise known as the keeper of the checkbook or KOTCB, won't let me kill anything that used to be cute, LOL......
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Spike elk can be frustrating sometimes.....

    We have a late season muzzledoader-only spike bull-only hunt. And muzzleloaders must use loose powder, exposed cap, no sabots, and iron sights.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Yeah Colorado went through that when In-line Muzzle loaders got popular....the Traditionalist's didn't like scopes being used and what-not....they should've printed the rules as "Primative Hunting"......but then the Archers didn't like that either...I stay away from all that and use a rifle in a limited draw area....it's hard enough to hunt quarry that's had every Tom Dick, and Harry pushing them around....get those guys out of the area and let me range.....I know how and where to hunt, even the hiding places....the animals will be there when they don't get run out of their home. Otherwise, it means going up to 11-12,000 feet....that's a Craig Boddington story!
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    HAWKEN wrote: »
    My wife, otherwise known as the keeper of the checkbook or KOTCB, won't let me kill anything that used to be cute, LOL......

    tell her they stink to all hell and cause disease and disorder...
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,385 Senior Member
    My primary deer zone restricts to a fork on one side or better, which had me trying to figure out what exactly I was looking at in bad light for both the 2010 and 2011 seasons. Finally drilled a 1x2 this year, and had to watch HIM for about 20 minutes to verify that he was packing legal headgear.

    Found myself again in bad light this year in Colorado trying to verify numbers of points on bull elk from about 450 yards. Also let a spike buck go on the last day of the season because he was almost certainly below the 5" limit.

    On the one hand, it's incredibly frustrating, because like you, I am in meat mode. On the other hand, if I had to play the survival game for real, I know I'd be doing OK.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    We have the 3 points on one side rule. Some areas it's 4. I have no problem with it.
    Our season bag limit is 2 bucks 4 does. That's 6 deer or 12 between the ol' lady and I. They go by "zones" here. Some are more liberal while some are more restricted. I've so far passed on 2 does and one basket racked little 6 pointer. I hunt on public land and the deer densities per mile or acre are much lower than some areas and the hunting pressure is much higher.

    Edited to add: there is some obscure exception to the 3 point thing based on spread But I've yet to figure out how to get the deer to stand still while I measure that.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    We have the antler restrictions here also. I am kind on the fence as to if I agree with it, but that is the way it is.
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I think your Texas law is stupid. Misjudge by half an in h and you are in trou le, correct?

    I don't think it's stupid - just unreasonable for kids. The 13" rule has caused me to shoot better deer, but many adult hunters are no better than kids when they see deer with nice racks, but too small. Some get over-excited and shoot the marginal bucks that would be great deer in one more year. Then, when they put one down and it ground-truths to only 12-1/2", they drag it into the brush and go home. This is speculation, of course, because nobody would admit to it, but I believe it happens.

    Others, like one of my nephews who was hunting with his grandpa, take the deer home, and hope they don't get caught. In his case, they just took it to a processor, who promptly turned them into the game warden. He reamed them good and scared the hell out of them with threats of fines and imprisonment, but merely issued a warning citation, because they "had all the 'right' answers." He told them if it happened again they must call him immediately, without mentioning what the repercussions might be. He agreed that the suggested method of determining legality (antlers wider than the ears, in 'alert' condition) proved out on their deer, but it still was only 12-1/2". He said that was only a guide and that the actual measurement determined whether the law was broken. So, the game warden does have some leeway, but you can't depend on them taking a reasonable approach - it has a lot to do with whether or not they like you.

    I shot a 16" buck, two years ago, that I believed had just barely met the threshold for legality. He was a big deer, with a tall rack (rather than wide), and his ears were wider than the average buck, so I was quite nervous about him until I put the tape to him. Last year's 9 point was obviously legal, at 17", because he was older and had a lot of mass to his antlers, and a straight back, but he is the first one I've ever shot that I could tell immediately that he was a shooter (without binoculars).

    The cull bucks are the hardest, because they have to have one slick antler. I passed on a nice sized 'cowhorn', this year, because I was afraid he might have a nub that I couldn't see, at 200+ yards, and in shadow.
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,720 Senior Member
    Thats sad, really.[/QUOTE]

    cpj, That was all in fun as I don't listen to her all that much. I have one rifle that has harvested 36 deer......Robin

    PS: I have enough rifles to arm a small country...
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    bml wrote: »
    We have the antler restrictions here also. I am kind on the fence as to if I agree with it, but that is the way it is.

    In south GA, we don't have that restriction. I can shoot 10 does, and two bucks, one of which has to have a minimum of four points, total. Other than increasing the number of does over the years, the rules have been this way for years.

    10 years ago, we still had doe days, and I think we could only take 2 of them. Then they upped it to 5, then did away with doe days... Every day is doe day. Then we got a ten doe limit.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,111 Senior Member
    Seems like Colorado has more special restrictions than Carters has pills. Just getting past where, when, what and how you can hunt can be exhausting.

    For example, for areas that allow you to hunt with Over-The-Counter (OTC) bull elk tags, you are restricted to bulls with at least 4 points on one side, or a brow time that is at least 5 inches long. No telling how many young bulls and been killed and abondoned over that reg.

    Even the GMU that JB and others hunted this year that had either sex tags had that restriction for bulls.

    There used to be a similar regulation for deer, but now there is no such thing as an OTC deer tag. You have to draw one. Same for antelope.

    And then there's the Ranching for Wildlife programs that allow a few really big ranches to offer hunts, using archery, black powder, center fire rifle or whatever for the months of September and October. In exchange, they have to offer a limited amount of some some sort of public access for the first 10 days of November.

    There's more, but my fingers are getting sore.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    I looked into CO for antelope hunting once... I was so confused after reading for five minutes that I gave up. The language was borderline indecipherable.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Seems like Colorado has more special restrictions than Carters has pills. Just getting past where, when, what and how you can hunt can be exhausting.

    For example, for areas that allow you to hunt with Over-The-Counter (OTC) bull elk tags, you are restricted to bulls with at least 4 points on one side, or a brow time that is at least 5 inches long. No telling how many young bulls and been killed and abondoned over that reg.

    Even the GMU that JB and others hunted this year that had either sex tags had that restriction for bulls.

    There used to be a similar regulation for deer, but now there is no such thing as an OTC deer tag. You have to draw one. Same for antelope.

    And then there's the Ranching for Wildlife programs that allow a few really big ranches to offer hunts, using archery, black powder, center fire rifle or whatever for the months of September and October. In exchange, they have to offer a limited amount of some some sort of public access for the first 10 days of November.

    There's more, but my fingers are getting sore.

    I honestly don't see how you guys keep up with it all. I used to hunt out there every year and we always had to have a bull session with our little booklets. First choice preference point, second choice, the hunt and area we really wanted. We have a few areas that you have to draw for and even an Elk hunt but otherwise you can buy your tags over the counter at Wal Mart, an LGS, just wherever. On the big ranch thing, I think I remember reading about that access program but this does not address all that land locked BLM land that the surrounding land owners deny access to
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,111 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    I looked into CO for antelope hunting once... I was so confused after reading for five minutes that I gave up. The language was borderline indecipherable.

    Ah, grasshoppa, you have much to learn.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,852 Senior Member
    I really don't think they're that hard, but it could just be from using them each year. There are some parts you have to read twice, but for the most part, you can hunt elk in 2 rifle seasons almost anywhere in the state for the same tag you go buy at wal-mart. Any other animal is by draw only
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    On the big ranch thing, I think I remember reading about that access program but this does not address all that land locked BLM land that the surrounding land owners deny access to

    Yee-up THAT'S still a current issue that's being worked on...ticks us off too! It's federal land....it's your's an mine's land....but getting to it is blocked by a private land-owner....until the State gets off it's butt and creates access.

    Antelope hunting is easier in WY....but the speed-goats are the same...they KNOW where the safe side of the fence is.
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,852 Senior Member
    I honestly don't see how you guys keep up with it all. I used to hunt out there every year and we always had to have a bull session with our little booklets. First choice preference point, second choice, the hunt and area we really wanted. We have a few areas that you have to draw for and even an Elk hunt but otherwise you can buy your tags over the counter at Wal Mart, an LGS, just wherever. On the big ranch thing, I think I remember reading about that access program but this does not address all that land locked BLM land that the surrounding land owners deny access to

    Ranching for Wildlife and Big Game Access are 2 entirely different programs. The BGA gives money to ranchers to allow hunters to access their land by foot and is specifically set up for antelope, small game and upland bird hunting. Its mostly BS quite honestly, a LOT of the land that has been "given" to the hunters for access is barren wasteland without crops or water and go figure, game. For the bird hunters its worked out better, but for big game what you get is 50 yahoos shooting at each other on tiny pieces of land.

    RFW is part success story, part sham. RFW is ONLY open to residents and you have to have at least 5 preference points to qualify, and many of the ranches require much higher points. They get to decided where you can and cannot go on the ranch, and can or cannot provide guides/help, but, thankfully they can NOT charge for access, guiding, or help. In fact the RFW program even outright states you are not allowed to tip or give gifts to ranch staff. RFW can basically set their own hunting seasons. I know a guy who nailed a 380" elk last year doing a RFW, in August, with a rifle. That is almost 2 months earlier then the first rifle season. Another kick in the pants, is that the amount of points required does NOT equal quality. Some ranches may take 12-15 points, but that is because a lot of people put in for it because its closer to the city or near a trophy unit. Just means lots of people want to hunt it, not that you're going to kill the animal of a lifetime. However I am seriously looking at my options for doing a RFW hunt now that I'm really racking up mule deer points. If I put in another year or 2 for just points alone, I'm going to be in a position to hunt damn near anywhere in the state I want most likely. Starting to get a bit unnerving between spending the points in an area I know like the back of my hand and has produced some of the biggest mule deer on record, or plopping them down on areas that hold even MORE records. I'm also getting up in points to hunt some of the most prime areas for white tail with solid chances at a whitey in the 200" class. Of course THAT, would require several thousand dollars to an outfitter as those lands are mostly locked up private ranches. Still.....lots of people pay a LOT more money every year for much smaller deer.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    I really don't think they're that hard, but it could just be from using them each year. There are some parts you have to read twice, but for the most part, you can hunt elk in 2 rifle seasons almost anywhere in the state for the same tag you go buy at wal-mart. Any other animal is by draw only

    No, it's stupidly hard. Here, I buy one license. Ten does, two bucks. If I hunt management land, another fee. I just abide by that particular managed areas hunt dates. Some are archery only all season, some are no different than private land, and some are only open in certain dates.

    THAT'S what you call "not that hard". For CO, you need a lawyer to read the crap for you. Yall's regulations read like the Obamacare bill.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,852 Senior Member
    Well we have "tags" and not a "license" for big game. We have a "license" for small game and birds that is good for anything legal under that license, during any season they're legal to shoot. That is probably what is confusing to a lot of folks, our small game/upland bird is like your deer hunting. The easiest break down is to pick your weapon, bow/ML/rifle, then pick your quarry. After that it is just a matter of seeing where you can get a tag. Some of it can be pretty confusing I know, but when you know locals, like all of you guys here do, its really not that hard. Like for the guys that came out with me it was simple, call the DOW, and buy an either sex elk, 2nd rifle, unit 54. The points stuff can get a bit tricky, but the only people really needing to even read that section, are going after a prime area/season. If you just want to shoot a bull elk, you can buy tags in 2 seasons now (used to be 4 until very recently) and hunt in the vast majority of the state. An OTC tag for 55 is as good as 84 and 248, the only restrictions for those 2 seasons (2nd and 3rd rifle) are just for prime units where you have either less pressure, of higher chance of larger animals.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,111 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    No, it's stupidly hard. Here, I buy one license. Ten does, two bucks. If I hunt management land, another fee. I just abide by that particular managed areas hunt dates. Some are archery only all season, some are no different than private land, and some are only open in certain dates.

    THAT'S what you call "not that hard". For CO, you need a lawyer to read the crap for you. Yall's regulations read like the Obamacare bill.

    Colorado purposely makes its hunting regs difficult to understand to make it hard for the feeble minded to hunt here. Seems like it's working. :rotflmao:
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    No, it's stupidly hard. Here, I buy one license. Ten does, two bucks. If I hunt management land, another fee. I just abide by that particular managed areas hunt dates. Some are archery only all season, some are no different than private land, and some are only open in certain dates.

    THAT'S what you call "not that hard". For CO, you need a lawyer to read the crap for you. Yall's regulations read like the Obamacare bill.

    With apologies to my Western friends I must string along with Buffco on this issue. From what we're used to y'all's regs are Chinese algebra to us. And don't get me started on your non-resident license fees.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Colorado purposely makes its hunting regs difficult to understand to make it hard for the feeble minded to hunt here. Seems like it's working. :rotflmao:

    :D
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    E-E551-04-R....worked for me this year.....my only B was calling for a HIP# in case I shot a 'yote....
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    E-E551-04-R....worked for me this year.....my only B was calling for a HIP# in case I shot a 'yote....

    We don't speak freaky-deaky Dutch, ok perv boy?
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