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For GENERAL reloading info, which manual?

BuffcoBuffco Senior MemberPosts: 6,244 Senior Member
Which one describes the reloading process best? I'm not to the point of caring much about load data, so much as I am instructions on how to reload in general.
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Replies

  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    The ABC's of reloading is an excellent "How To" manual. I believe that most of the "data" manuals contain a pretty good amount of how to info also.
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    bml wrote: »
    The ABC's of reloading is an excellent "How To" manual. I believe that most of the "data" manuals contain a pretty good amount of how to info also.
    cpj wrote: »
    Lee, if you overlook the self promtion. I know folks that reccomend "The ABCs of Reloading", but I thought it sucked. It would be worth checking out at the library if you can though.
    Lymans is pretty good too.

    :tooth:

    The edition I read was pretty helpful for dense folks like me.
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    Or, you can just forget the manual and wing it!!
  • RiflemannRiflemann Member Posts: 269 Member
    I have gotten alot of good info from the Hornady manual.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,922 Senior Member
    Lyman. Great manual, simple language. Shouldn't be a problem for folks from GA.

    Second is the Lee, but as others say, it's got some "Lee is best because..." issues.
    I'm just here for snark.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,721 Senior Member
    I would suggest Lyman.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,683 Senior Member
    I read and read, but nothing was as good as actually having a good handloader mentor me.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,721 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I read and read, but nothing was as good as actually having a good handloader mentor me.

    Quite true. Nothing works better than hands on.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Lyman. Great manual, simple language. Shouldn't be a problem for folks from GA.

    I hope it has lots of picchers.

    Lyman and Lee manuals on the way. Thanks.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Here's one of the best ones I've used- - - -got a couple of copies around the shop.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0910676399/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_3_olp?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1353901591&sr=1-3-fkmr0&keywords=Metallic+Cartridge+Reloading+Ed+Matunas&condition=used

    It's out of print now, but the front of the book with all the basic reloading info hasn't changed since people started reloading brass cases over 100 years ago. Ed Matunas goes into great detail about the history of reloading, basic procedures, and lots of safety instruction. Some of the info on powder might be a little dated, but any powder manufacturer's website can bring you up to speed on ther newer offerings.
    Jerry
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,516 Senior Member
    If youre going to reload eventually, you may as well buy a book with data in it. most if not all have the reloading process outlined. i started out witht he ABCs of Reloading and have passed it onto several friends.

    just any fyi, every mfg will plug their own equipment. doesnt make since to plug your competitors.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Lyman's Bry
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • robert38-55robert38-55 Senior Member Posts: 3,621 Senior Member
    Buffy I don't know which book is the Best. When I started reloading I bought several different books. I did have a copy of the ABC's of reloading. My Lee and Hornday,Speer, Lyman. reloading manuals had some good reloading information in them. My suggestion is if ya can go to a book store or LGS that sells these books, look through them at the store. This will help you decide which ones' you might want, and which ones' are more what I call "User Friendly to me" type of format and style. You might be able to find some good reloading tutorials on the utube, I mean just to get some information and see first hand with a visual reference. By the time I had to sell off my reloading equipment and supplies,stock, I had a pretty darn good reloading library.
    "It is what it is":usa:
  • sarg1csarg1c Senior Member Posts: 1,707 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I read and read, but nothing was as good as actually having a good handloader mentor me.

    That is one of the best ways to learn, I also like the" ABCof RELOADING". Also a load of good info on the web... But if you know someone loading, go for it.. As you learn more you will find a few things you may do different. Some like to deprime before cleaning, I clean then inspect no need to deprime a case just to throw away and I don't like dirty shells run through my dies, but that's me.. anyone loading wouldn't care to help. I've helped a few people myself...Good luck, main thing,enjoy....

    I'd like to add: Visit your LGS, they sometimes have free manuals from powder co. and I download,making my own manual which I use more than a store bought manual because I reference it more by keeping notes in it.

    manual.jpg
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    I'm partial to the Speer because it's what I cut my teeth on. However, since I bought a couple more different ones, i think it's best to read two or three different ones because you get a different slant on things which can make things much more clear.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    I have an old NRA publication called the ABCs of reloading from years ago. Hornady manuals are a good source of information, you don't have to use the featured bullets (theirs or any of the others) to reload.

    I think it's Graf & Sons who have this/last years edition of Hornady on sale for $9.99. You don't necessarily need the latest one, unless some new powder or caliber is featured in the newest you plan to reload for.

    I have some "One Cartridge/One Book" manuals someplace which list about every conceivable reload for one caliber from using homemade cast bullets (by mold used) through jacketed in about every weight with bullet maker and powder company data too.

    Here ya go, scroll down, it's the 8th Edition. I think they as the rest have a minimum order of 40 bucks or so, but shipping is only $4.99 for any weight of your order.

    http://www.grafs.com/
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,644 Senior Member
    I like the Speer manual.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,644 Senior Member
    Addition: the Speer 9 manual (from the 1970s) is very detailed and informative so far as procedure goes. However, the newer powders just aren't in there.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    My first manual that I bought used in 1977 was the Lyman. I've also got the most current one and it's just as good.


    Magnoliadamage008.jpg


    And they got picchers!


    Magnoliadamage005.jpg
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    Addition: the Speer 9 manual (from the 1970s) is very detailed and informative so far as procedure goes. However, the newer powders just aren't in there.

    Gene, that's the manual I cut my teeth on. But you're right, the newer powders aren't there. I use it for all the old favorites of course, but it generally has very conservative data. However, there is at least one load in it that has caused me to experience high pressure. 57 grains of IMR 4831 in my particular rifle will get you some very high pressure. This is the experience that taught me to go very slowly the closer I got to the top book value and that all rifles are an entity unto themselves. Don't ever assume anything. All of this was written in the book but I chose to ignore it, or rather didn't pay close enough attention to what I read. This manual tells in very plain English very clearly how to go about working up a SAFE load. This was my wake up call. I still go by its procedures.

    However, as I said, it wasn't the book's fault. It was a nooby that didn't pay attention. Other than that, this book has been a great teacher. The only problem is that today with Varget and the Reloaders and some of the other new powders and also new cartridges, you are left out in the data department. But the real asset within this book is the knowledge of reloading procedure.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    The only one I've ever used is the Speer Manual. It's probably as good as any.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 2,040 Senior Member
    I would agree the Lyman and Lee are the best for getting started. I remember as a little boy in dad's shop and that old (ooops....period relative Lyman manual) always there.

    The internet and YouTube are also great resources. I've learned several firearm procedures on youtube.

    JMHO
    Bellcat
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • JLDickmonJLDickmon Senior Member Posts: 1,726 Senior Member
    Lyman
    Never laugh at your wife's choices.
    You are one of them.
  • sarg1csarg1c Senior Member Posts: 1,707 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    My first manual that I bought used in 1977 was the Lyman. I've also got the most current one and it's just as good.


    Magnoliadamage008.jpg


    And they got picchers!


    Magnoliadamage005.jpg
    I like the Lyman press pictured there, I have one along with two LEE single stage presss's that I use most of the timers. I bought two at a flea market a few years ago for $15.00, kept one sold the other for $15.00..Wish I had kept both but it helped a friend get started reloading, so it was OK....
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,648 Senior Member
    I started out with ABC's and with the Hogdon manual also have a Hornady manual , they all have some good info.
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    I've read the basics are all the same in every manual....safely assembling your own ammunition is not hard or complicated. Getting it to your acceptance of accuracy is the trick....and that's just a process of elimination by loading different powder charges in increments until you find a balance of the velocity and accuracy you're looking for.

    Now Buff....here comes your next big purchase.....a Chronograph! I use the Competition Electronics Inc. Pro Chrono as it was recommended by the board years ago.....Simple to use and fairly inexpensive.
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,276 Senior Member
    I found the Lee book to be very readable, goes into detail about cast bullet manufacture, loading. yes, you gotta go through the product promotion but the information is solid. You have to wade through the promotion by several authors/companies to get to the meat of the subject. But even the self promotion can be worthwhile reading. I will offer the G. David Tubb books about High Power shooting as an example.

    All the loading companies offer good information.
    I have read through the Nosler, Hogegdon, and Sierra books also. Good reads all.
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member

    Now Buff....here comes your next big purchase.....a Chronograph! I use the Competition Electronics Inc. Pro Chrono as it was recommended by the board years ago.....Simple to use and fairly inexpensive.

    But I don't WANT a chrony...
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    I don't wanna hear it.....you're gonna get a Chony Mister Man.....and you're gonna LIKE it! harumpf harumpf!
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    I don't wanna hear it.....you're gonna get a Chony Mister Man.....and you're gonna LIKE it! harumpf harumpf!

    I'd rather just take the books suggested fps for gospel. Besides, the bullet will either hit where it's supposed to, or it won't. Why do I care if the bullet is a few fps faster or slower than advertised?

    I seem to remember our esteemed colleague of the Brushy Order saying the same thing a while back...
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