Dorset Naga's and various garden pics.

MichakavMichakav Senior MemberPosts: 2,422 Senior Member
Well, after 2 years of trying, my Dorset Naga's are bearing fruit finally. They are not really hard to grow once established, but germination can be a real chore. The soil must remain between 80-83F for roughly 18-23 days until signs of life.

I also have Red Savina habs., Hot Banana, Sweet Banana, Cherry, Bell, Anaheim and Jalaps. Tomatoes are Cherry, Roma, Rutgers and Early Girl.

Most of the Naga's will be getting dried, so if anyone is wanting any seeds just send me a PM. I am going to send a few to Al so he can put them in a radioactive display box....

Naga's.....
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Naga's....
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Not sure if I can bring myself to eat a Naga, but I am sure my boy and his friends will try them for the right price..:devil:

Replies

  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    I've got one lone Bhut Jolakia survivor. Like you, I had a hard time with germination. I kept them on a heating pad, but it came unplugged a few times and I think that's what screwed me up. I will gladly take some seeds, so I can try again next year. I was hoping to find a reliable source for plants instead of starting seed, but hardly anyone here grows them for sale.
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    A buddy of mine purchased established Bhut plants the last couple years and did real well. He got his online from somewhere. I am trying to find out for you now where he got them. I will be planting those next year also.
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    I almost bought some off of Cragslist, but it was too far to drive, and I was worried about cross pollination, since he saved seeds. Most folks think cross pollination affects the current years fruit, but the genes are passed on to the seeds and the next year you may end up with a mix breed pepper. It might still be butt kicking hot lol.
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    Shoot me a PM with your address and I will get you some seeds out when ready.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    bml wrote: »
    I almost bought some off of Cragslist, but it was too far to drive, and I was worried about cross pollination, since he saved seeds. Most folks think cross pollination affects the current years fruit, but the genes are passed on to the seeds and the next year you may end up with a mix breed pepper. It might still be butt kicking hot lol.

    Funny you should mention cross-pollination. I actually hand pollinated alot of the buds to try and avoid that very thing.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    Is anybody else experimenting with hot/inferno type peppers?
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    I was planning on having several different types of peppers this year, some of them scalding hot, and some of them more of a novelty like the Peter Pepper. Unfortunately, I had some germination issues and things didnt work out like planned. Next year, I'm gonna try for some White Habaneros, a Brain Strain pepper, and several others in the million scovile unit range.

    Here is an interesting site I ran across on the net. http://www.thehotpepper.com/forum/12-hot-pepper-talk/
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • bklysenbklysen Member Posts: 403 Member
    I bought a few Buht seeds from a guy on Ebay, had no idea how specific the germination temps had to be controlled, so I lost them. Neevr had a clue as to what happened, Now I know.

    I'd LOVE to get a few of your seeds when ready. Have you stumbled upon the thread detailing how a few of us smoked the hotter peppers for grinding? That ends up great table fare.

    Actually, if left to my own devices for a while I can dream up a LOT of uses for them. I don't know too many people who enjoy that stuff as much as I do (around here anyway), so they tend to last a long time. I bet I eat some derivative from those things every day of the year, on something, between ground product, plain old hot sauce, BBQ sauce, etc. etc. Actually a lot of health benefits to that, if I can believe most of what I read.
  • bklysenbklysen Member Posts: 403 Member
    PS...any of you guys like Dave's Insanity sauce?
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    bklysen wrote: »
    PS...any of you guys like Dave's Insanity sauce?

    I haven't had the opportunity yet, but its on my list.
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • bklysenbklysen Member Posts: 403 Member
    Honestly, be careful with it. We got one bottle many moons ago and there's still a teenie bit left in the fridge. A few drops will alter a whole batch of chili, stew, whatever. I've had folks insert just the end of a toothpick along the inside of the neck of the bottle, roll it along their tongue and start crying.

    Good stuff. :love:
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    bklysen wrote: »
    I bought a few Buht seeds from a guy on Ebay, had no idea how specific the germination temps had to be controlled, so I lost them. Neevr had a clue as to what happened, Now I know.

    I'd LOVE to get a few of your seeds when ready. Have you stumbled upon the thread detailing how a few of us smoked the hotter peppers for grinding? That ends up great table fare.

    Actually, if left to my own devices for a while I can dream up a LOT of uses for them. I don't know too many people who enjoy that stuff as much as I do (around here anyway), so they tend to last a long time. I bet I eat some derivative from those things every day of the year, on something, between ground product, plain old hot sauce, BBQ sauce, etc. etc. Actually a lot of health benefits to that, if I can believe most of what I read.

    Shoot me a pm with your address and I will send some out when done. I did see the thread about smoking them and plan on doing some that way. I will probably pick your brain when the time comes though.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    bklysen wrote: »
    I bought a few Buht seeds from a guy on Ebay, had no idea how specific the germination temps had to be controlled, so I lost them. Neevr had a clue as to what happened, Now I know.

    I'd LOVE to get a few of your seeds when ready. Have you stumbled upon the thread detailing how a few of us smoked the hotter peppers for grinding? That ends up great table fare.

    Actually, if left to my own devices for a while I can dream up a LOT of uses for them. I don't know too many people who enjoy that stuff as much as I do (around here anyway), so they tend to last a long time. I bet I eat some derivative from those things every day of the year, on something, between ground product, plain old hot sauce, BBQ sauce, etc. etc. Actually a lot of health benefits to that, if I can believe most of what I read.

    Here is a link to where I get my seeds from. He also has great germinating and growing tips.

    http://www.thehippyseedcompany.com/

    Another good one to follow.

    http://www.thehottestpepper.com/how-to-grow-bhut-jolokia-seeds.html
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,619 Senior Member
    Michakav wrote: »
    Is anybody else experimenting with hot/inferno type peppers?


    I haven't planted my garden for the last couple of years but all I've been growing are peppers and tomatoes. The cross pollenation is a very real problem and the only way you can really avoid it is to keep bees off the plants.(good luck) Aside from the heat, the soil around here is almost solid sand and nutrients get leached out really fast. Between the soil, heat, and lattitude, I'm really limited as to what grows well. Even with the tomatoes, I can only grow smaller varieties like romas, cherrys, and grapes. The big meaty varieties don't do well. Incidently, there is a magazine based specifically on peppers and spicy foods called chili pepper magazine. I had a subscription for several years and it's full of a lot of awesome recipes.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    I'm thinking on getting a few Trinidad Scorpion seeds for next year.....
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,688 Senior Member
    bml wrote: »
    I've got one lone Bhut Jolakia survivor.

    I HAD one in a pot. Growing fine, got some flowers.... Then some insect cut all the leaves off. Damnit.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    Here is one called the Brain Strain Pepper that I would like to try next year. post-245-1284888556.jpg
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,422 Senior Member
    Now that is one intimidating pepper. Just looks plain nasty. I love it!
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