Magazine spring retention

JeffDJeffD New MemberPosts: 8 New Member
I recently purchased a Ruger LC9 for personal carry. I remember in the "old" days that "they" used to recommend that magazines be unloaded every few months and left for a period of time so the spring will not "take a set" and weaken. As I like to carry it full (7+1) is this still true? Just wondering. Thanks for the input.

Replies

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,101 Senior Member
    Cycling a spring wears it out. Leaving it compressed or uncompressed doesn't. So in actuality, regular unloading will wear it out quicker.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,458 Senior Member
    Welcome to the nut house! Brother Bream has already gave you an excellent answer to your question. Pull up a chair and stick around for a while!

    You don't happen to like gladiator movies do you?
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,058 Senior Member
    The War-Monkey is spot on..."They" are passing on a fairy tale. I have used magazines that sat loaded in a drawer for 20+ years and they functioned without a hitch.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • REDDEVILREDDEVIL Member Posts: 153 Member
    :angry: Dangit, I have succumbed to misinformation! I rotate my magazines for this very reason and I end up doing more harm than if I just let them be. Well, now I know better
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    It is an old chestnut and repeated often, however, it has been de-bunked many times, magazine springs do not suffer ill from leaving them loaded, I have proved that too.

    Magazines have been left loaded for decades, however the ammo will sometimes corrode and jam the magazine.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,967 Senior Member
    JeffD:
    Welcome aboard.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,101 Senior Member
    Now, that being said... I don't load my AR mags all the way. I take 'em down 10% (- 2 in a 20 rd., -3 in a 30 rd.) but that's because it makes them easier to load into the rifle if you have the bolt forward and you're using GI spec mags like I do. PMag users don't have this concern. Browning Hi Powers are supposedly more reliable if you load the mag with 12, not 13 rounds. But downloading is done for functional reasons, not to save the spring.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,458 Senior Member
    REDDEVIL wrote: »
    :angry: Dangit, I have succumbed to misinformation! I rotate my magazines for this very reason and I end up doing more harm than if I just let them be. Well, now I know better

    Don't loose too much sleep over it. How many times does a mag get loaded and emptied at the range? They are designed to be used. Chances are, most of us will have a hard time wearing out a magazine spring if we rotated our ammo daily.
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,424 Senior Member
    A couple of years ago I got to fire a milspec 1911 that had been in a bedside table drawer for over 40 years with the same loaded magazine in it. The mag, and the box of GI ball ammo stored with it with an early 1950's headstamp date performed flawlessly. If that mag spring hadn't "taken a set" I wonder how long one would have to be compressed?
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,967 Senior Member
    Don't loose too much sleep over it. How many times does a mag get loaded and emptied at the range? They are designed to be used. Chances are, most of us will have a hard time wearing out a magazine spring if we rotated our ammo daily.

    Actually, the mag springs that came with the early Sigma series springs would wear out in a couple of years without excessive use, they would not push the follower up enough to cause slide lock back after firing the last rnd.

    I, also, had an aftermarket 15 rnd mag for a PT-92 that might do the same after moderate use or maybe not load the last rnd or 2.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • mkk41mkk41 Banned Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    Plus plus on what has been said. A lot has to do with the type and quality of wire used for the spring. I did some tooling work for a local speciality spring company and learned quite a bit about springs. The cost of different grades/alloy of spring wire is amazing. And the applications are critical. Stainless spring wire isn't as resilient as modern chrome/vanadium/silicone and will take a set over time. Good mags ain't cheap , cheap mags ain't good.
    "There are no victims , only volunteers!"
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,661 Senior Member
    Cycling a spring wears it out. Leaving it compressed or uncompressed doesn't. So in actuality, regular unloading will wear it out quicker.


    I have never worn out a magazine spring. If it was true there would be quite a market for 22 magazines.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Normally one would figure that shooting a magazine much would wear it out faster, but practice has proven otherwise, I have cycled magazines with countless rounds, M-16 magazines, etc without a magazine spring failure.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    You sure do love running bad gun info and gunstore counter lore and gunshop commandos through with the sword O' truth don't you Wambli Ska ??? :jester:

    I sure enjoyed that immensely !! :jester:
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,855 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    Actually, the mag springs that came with the early Sigma series springs would wear out in a couple of years without excessive use, they would not push the follower up enough to cause slide lock back after firing the last rnd.

    I, also, had an aftermarket 15 rnd mag for a PT-92 that might do the same after moderate use or maybe not load the last rnd or 2.



    :that: I also believe it has to do with the quality of the spring. Most are good, some are junk.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,855 Senior Member
    mkk41 wrote: »
    Plus plus on what has been said. A lot has to do with the type and quality of wire used for the spring. I did some tooling work for a local speciality spring company and learned quite a bit about springs. The cost of different grades/alloy of spring wire is amazing. And the applications are critical. Stainless spring wire isn't as resilient as modern chrome/vanadium/silicone and will take a set over time. Good mags ain't cheap , cheap mags ain't good.

    :that: One more vote for the "It depends on the quality of the spring" gang. To me that goes without saying. Cheap springs won't stand the test of time.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JeffDJeffD New Member Posts: 8 New Member
    Thanks NN
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    A couple of years ago I got to fire a milspec 1911 that had been in a bedside table drawer for over 40 years with the same loaded magazine in it. The mag, and the box of GI ball ammo stored with it with an early 1950's headstamp date performed flawlessly. If that mag spring hadn't "taken a set" I wonder how long one would have to be compressed?
    Jerry

    Teach is not the first I'd heard of who had this experience, both mag and ammo from near or over half-a-century old, fully loaded the whole time, functioning flawlessly.

    But, he's probably the most RELIABLE source of this info I've found yet!

    IF ONLY we lived long enough to fully wear out the guns we own...
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,046 Senior Member
    :spam:????
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    Yep, my 303 mag was left loaded by the guy who's wife gave it to me because before he died he instructed her to do so, and she said that gun had been loaded for years and my mag spring works great. Bream said it all on his post, keeping it compressed will not hurt the mag but unloading and loading is what will wear it out. gunrunner is so right on, IF ONLY we lived long enough to fully wear out the guns we own...
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,651 Senior Member
    I adhere to all of the above, but just to play devil's advocate (my favorite pastime), there are magazine springs and then there are 'magazine' springs.

    One of my brothers-in-law used to own a shiny Jennings something or other in .380, before I shamed him into getting rid of it. The magazine spring went dead on it after about 6 months of being loaded...but then Jennings and all of its other incarnations had many more serious issues than that.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Not being any type of authority re. magazines (except I DO know they're not clips), I asked this question a couple years back.

    Someone -- I forget who -- said that we don't go outside and jack up our vehicles to relieve the spring tension on them. ha ha

    I'm thinking that maybe, maybe, with a gazillion mass produced WW2 magazines, there might have been some spring failure and those were legit stories, but probably rare. We have to remember that WW2 was essentially the first time that hand weapons other than revolvers or bolt rifles were used in a large quantity. And tooling up quickly for war, we know corners were cut (not to mention the occasional very nasty fraud). So possibly we had some mag springs go bust?

    Just guessing.

    Like most everyone here, I've never had the slightest malfunction of a mag spring (or any other spring) in my handguns. Mind you, they aren't antiques -- all are fairly new.

    I however do unload my magazines by shooting the ammo! And once and then, unloading the mags for a general cleaning.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
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