Home Defense and Bullet Protection

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Replies

  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Cheaper and can stop 5.56 NATO very well and cost effective, the old wire lathe screen, slathered with 2 inches of cement, it would take a .50 BMG round to punch through two walls of that, also very old clap boards used for exterior walls stop rounds too.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Ever hear the joke about Bob The Bridge Builder?

    For some odd reason, the joke works better if told as "Pierre the Bridge Builder" and with a fake foreign accent.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,335 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    The cheap route? Don't miss.
    That saves quite a bit on ammo as well!
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,335 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Oh yeah. You ever install what I sent?
    Have you heard me crying and whining? No, I haven't. I am waiting on some jackass to give me his cabinets so I can finish the install. It is holding up the entire man-cave project, but making a fuss will not make him move faster. It is like cussing at a glacier because it is slow. All I can do is sit and wait...
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,509 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    They also make Kevlar-impregnated dry wall...it's used in high-security installations and will do the job you're looking for...
    We shot up a bunch of the stuff....pretty impressive...

    Yep. Back when I was drywalling professionally, we did a new county courthouse, very near where you bought your dog. All of the judges benches, and back walls of the courtrooms were built out of the bullet proof drywall. There were also several "safe" walls throughout the building, ends of hallways, ends of office blocks, etc. I finished all of it, it's just like regular drywall on the outside.

    The head plumber tested it, it stopped all handgun rounds, up to .454 casull. I can't remember if he tested rifle rounds or not.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,177 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    I can't remember if he tested rifle rounds or not.

    We did. .223 and .308 from 25 and 50 yards...Bullets zipped right through but were slowed impressively...The stuff stopped every handgun/shotgun projectile we fired.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,335 Senior Member
    I am still trying to find the stuff that is actual drywall. Does anyone have a name for it? All that I am finding is ballistic panels that you then install drywall on top of.
    Here is some stuff called Armor Core...
    http://armorcore.com/applications/residential/
  • REDDEVILREDDEVIL Member Posts: 153 Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    I am still trying to find the stuff that is actual drywall. Does anyone have a name for it? All that I am finding is ballistic panels that you then install drywall on top of.
    Here is some stuff called Armor Core...
    http://armorcore.com/applications/residential/

    I have done commercial construction for 10 years and have had several jobs in which we used a bullet resistant gypsum board, but never a bulletproof board. I actually read this thread and went on a hunt for one of my old spec books for one of these jobs and the system they required was a double layer of drywall on both sides of the partition (we used metal stud framing instead of 2x4's, no ballistic reason, just what we typically use commercially) First layer was a high impact/impact resistant drywall (not high abuse or abuse resistant) which has a 1/4" thick webbing in the middle of the 5/8" board (pain in the butt to cut) and the bullet resistant drywall over that. The idea was that although the bullet resistant sheetrock handled most of the impact, the secondary layer with webbing increased the first layers tensile strength. I am rather keen on the idea of sandwiching the 1/4" steel board you mentiond between these two layers; this three layer system on both sides of a 2x4 wall would only result in a thickness of 6 1/2" abd be very reassuring, to me anyways. Here is a link I found researching the specs online and it is a true gypsum board: https://www.kamcoboston.com/Store/productView.asp?productID=4&name=Drywall&categoryID=31&category=Drywall. If you notice, it is the second to last on the list of drywall to the right of the picture. I am sure there are many other manufacturers, but this is the first one I found and I figured that you might feel better knowing that you are not chasing Bigfoot.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,335 Senior Member
    Thanks for the link. I met up with Rallykid a bit earlier today to show him some things that are going on at my house, and not to get specific, but the whole idea is to build in layer after layer of redundancy as far as the issue of security is concerned. While I am still leaning toward the steel for his application, I do want to find out more about the bullet resistant drywall. I will get in touch with my supplier next week and maybe he can get me a sheet that I can play with for testing. Being a builder and all, it could be useful to know about high security residential remodeling.
  • REDDEVILREDDEVIL Member Posts: 153 Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    Thanks for the link. I met up with Rallykid a bit earlier today to show him some things that are going on at my house, and not to get specific, but the whole idea is to build in layer after layer of redundancy as far as the issue of security is concerned. While I am still leaning toward the steel for his application, I do want to find out more about the bullet resistant drywall. I will get in touch with my supplier next week and maybe he can get me a sheet that I can play with for testing. Being a builder and all, it could be useful to know about high security residential remodeling.
    No problem, I'm in the designing stage of building a house right now and these are the issues I'm hammering out as well, false walls, ballistic walls, hidey holes, etc., but it is definitely fun to design,... application, however, may be a different story.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,335 Senior Member
    I doubt it was either but I bet it would be a mother to get into. Now that we are talking about it, I might as well start learning what I can. I see a market for out there for panic rooms, ground floor tornado shelters, gun rooms, or whatever.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I would love to experiment with different materials and layers of materials, sandwiches, etc.... as well as home design that has lines of fire that do not cross living areas as well as false rooms and concealed bedrooms and galleries & escape chutes.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,335 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    I would love to experiment with different materials and layers of materials, sandwiches, etc...
    Me too. That portion of range fees, ammo, etc. can now be tax deductible because I will be shooting stuff for legitimate business purposes.:tooth:
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Are you familiar with those glass blocks ? if you silicone them together with good quality silicone they are almost indestructible, I do not know how they would hold up to sustained fire, but they can stop a few bullets.

    "Me too. That portion of range fees, ammo, etc. can now be tax deductible because I will be shooting stuff for legitimate business purposes."

    I am soooooo jealous !
    I would love to do R&D on such a project !!!
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • REDDEVILREDDEVIL Member Posts: 153 Member
    You don't want to get too crazy, afterall, you have to account for when dementia sets in,... you want to still be able to find the bathroom:rotflmao:
    ...lines of fire that do not cross living areas...

    I believe that area would be referred to as a chase,... I prefer all of my home to be a living space:tooth:
  • rallykidrallykid Senior Member Posts: 657 Senior Member
    Jerm, you have a PM.
    No, I do not have a pink fuzzy bunny fetish but apparently my Facebook hacking wife does.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Dude, there is lots of wasted and available space to do really wild stuff, and non of it expensive.

    If you know how that is.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • REDDEVILREDDEVIL Member Posts: 153 Member
    :that: A little creativity goes a long way,... necessity is the mother of invention.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,509 Senior Member
    I misspoke. It was bullet resistant drywall, or drywall like panels.
    I know the hangers didn't much like it. Heavy as heck, had to cut it with a saw.

    From what I remember, the 454 just about went through. Huge bulge on the back side. .380, 9mm, didn't even phase it.

    Looks like a fella can buy Kevlar 29 for about $35 a square yard. Maybe less. Make your own.
  • BakermanBakerman Member Posts: 382 Member
    Bakerman formerly known as Bakerman
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Remember the main mission is to slow down and trap or absorb the bullet(s) energy / momentum, (in the layers) not deflect it.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • ApexxApexx Member Posts: 111 Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    Here is the deal...
    I am a builder. My client's house is laid out where if an intruder were to enter and if he had to shoot, his kid's bedrooms would be directly behind where the bad guy would be. I think that I am going to propose putting up sheets of 1/4" steel plate over the existing drywall, and then glue on, finish, and paint 1/4" drywall over that.

    I am betting that it will stop slugs, buckshot, and most pistol rounds. I doubt it will stop .223. This will obviously have to be tested before we do it for real, but does anyone else have ideas or have any experience with what we are trying to accomplish?

    I can get 4'x8' sheets of A36 1/4" steel plate for about $275 a sheet.

    Thanks!


    I would refrain from representing in any form or fashion that you are engineering and/or constructing walls that are bullet proof and/or resistant. That would be an implied rating. Construction ratings for fire, wind load, etc are created by virtue of engineering and extensive testing. If the client wants to have 1/4" steel plate put in their wall that's fine, however I would have them sign something that says that you are not warranting it's rating in respect to bullet resistance. Producst designed and sold for bullet resistance have extensive field testing behind them.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,440 Senior Member
    Very good point Apexx.
  • rapier5316rapier5316 Member Posts: 312 Member
    acrylic sheets at about 2 inches will need to be hit with .30-06 AP rounds to penetrate. Works in many city banks and convenience stores.
    "The power of the United States has peaked, oppression follows." Robert Prector, Socionomics.net
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