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Trigger finger placement

Diver43Diver43 Senior MemberPosts: 11,755 Senior Member
I recently purchased a SW M&P Shield 9mm. My first trip to the range was to function check the two new guns in the house. Just put a handful of different types and makes of bullets through them and see what worked. Come to find out everything functioned perfectly through both guns. Fast forward a week and I took my new gun to the range alone with two different loads and shot for groups. Turned out i was a bit disappointed as it seemed like the gun shot an inch low and two inches left at only ten yards. I went to the range again last night and also brought along my MKII .22 that shoots dead center for me. Imagine how I felt when I put the SW down and took out the old trusty Ruger and shot to exactly the same spot on the target again. I remember the pie plate chart that says if your hitting here your doing this wrong. The chart said "jerking or too much trigger". I thought hmmm what is too much trigger. After returning home I took out both guns and aimed at a painting on the wall and dry fired both.

I then got on my trusty computer and as I often tell people "Google is my friend". After watching this video http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4584332856867071363# I discovered that the smaller Shield had me placing my finger differently on the trigger. After shooting several rounds I then put the same spot on my trigger finger on the other gun. I now know what TOO MUCH TRIGGER means.

This video might be a good refresher for others so I thought I would share my experience. Goes to show that even when you think that you know what you are doing, you may not. Adjusting to the size of a new gun made me change my long time grip on a old gun and threw my aim off. Todd Jarrett may never know he helped me but I would like to publicly say THANKS.
Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5

Replies

  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Didn't watch the video and you didn't say exactly where was ideal. I've always been taught that ideal is for the trigger to fall on the area that's between the ball of the finger and the 1st joint. I don't know if that's right but it's always worked for me.

    As we know, too little finger and we might "push" the gun away from the gun hand (to the left for right-handed), too much and we can "hook" the trigger and jerk it toward the gun hand (shot going toward the right for right-handed). And of course, too little finger and there's the risk of slipping off in a fast shoot situation.

    You bring up a good point. I often practice changing pistols at the range so I can quickly adapt to different grips and reach. I generally shoot 3 pistol types: My XD/XDMs, my 1911s, and my Glocks (all are .45acp). A bit of home (unloaded) practice switching quickly between pistols can really help, too.

    Thanks for the info.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,755 Senior Member
    Sam he talks about finger placement right around the 2:45 mark on the video. Using the pad of the finger directly under the fingernail. Not allowing the other joints in the finger to flex with pushes the bullet placement at the 7 oclock position which was exactly where I was hitting. I dont have long fingers so with my Sig and 1911s my finger laid perfectly without thought. Using the small SW my finger automatically went further through the trigger guard and rested almost on the joint. Such a small difference in grip changed POI by a couple of inches.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,123 Senior Member
    Too much or too little finger will cause issues, of course. Different handgun designs require different adjustments to the finger placement to ensure the trigger is pulled straight back. But shooting low and low/left for a right handed shooter is from jerking the trigger and/or pushing the gun/breaking the wrtist down on firing. If shooting low-left at 10 yards, fundamentals are more likely the cause than technique. While 10 yards, isn't very far, it is starting to get far enough back that little mistakes start showing up better. Try 15 and 25 yards if you haven't already. It'll let you know real quick when you make a mistake. Just my opinion. Worth what you paid for it..........

    ETA - an inch low and 2 inches left at 10 yards isn't all that bad. Could be better, but I've seen much worse from people shooting closer. I've seen folks who hit twice that far away at 7 yards..........
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,123 Senior Member
  • robert38-55robert38-55 Senior Member Posts: 3,621 Senior Member
    This video might be a good refresher for others so I thought I would share my experience. Goes to show that even when you think that you know what you are doing, you may not. Adjusting to the size of a new gun made me change my long time grip on a old gun and threw my aim off.

    :that::agree: I shoot a revolver much better than any semi-auto I ever owned... My theory: Practice, robert, Practice, Practice. I keep one of those handgun pie charts in my range box. I look at it every time I go shoot handguns..... Do we still have that handgun shooting pie chart in the Archives here?

    Jay

    Re: Trigger finger placement
    Too much or too little finger will cause issues, of course. Different handgun designs require different adjustments to the finger placement to ensure the trigger is pulled straight back. But shooting low and low/left for a right handed shooter is from jerking the trigger and/or pushing the gun/breaking the wrtist down on firing. If shooting low-left at 10 yards, fundamentals are more likely the cause than technique. While 10 yards, isn't very far, it is starting to get far enough back that little mistakes start showing up better. Try 15 and 25 yards if you haven't already. It'll let you know real quick when you make a mistake. Just my opinion. Worth what you paid for it..........

    You got that right Jay.. BTW I generally shoot low and to the right with my semi-autos. I am right hand dominate. I can shoot either with both eyes open or left eye closed. I generally shoot at 10 to 15yds... got any advice for me?
    "It is what it is":usa:
  • BakermanBakerman Member Posts: 382 Member
    correctionchart.jpg
    Bakerman formerly known as Bakerman
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,812 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Goes to show that even when you think that you know what you are doing, you may not. Adjusting to the size of a new gun made me change my long time grip on a old gun and threw my aim off. Todd Jarrett may never know he helped me but I would like to publicly say THANKS.

    I found this video several years ago and it demonstrated for me what Bigslug and BPSniper had already explained very well, in their forum 'tutorials' (all lost, now, with the archives being trashed). It improved my shooting immediately because it added consistency. I've always been able to hit a target, because I was taught as a kid to maintain 'sight picture' until recoil takes it away from you (follow-through). But, I had never been consistent in making follow-up shots, because my grip was sloppy and allowed my trigger finger to be jostled around. When that happens, you end up compensating by milking the grip and all manner of other bad habits that prevent consistency.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,005 Senior Member
    Good possibility your grip is too tight with the shield causing low left hits.

    The inch low is probably ammo related, you will have to aim 1" higher with that ammo
    or shoot a slower rnd.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,674 Senior Member
    These tutorials are great basic information...however, "the right way" may not work for everyone...shoot enough to discover what works for you...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
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