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Got another pocket rocket!

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  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Here's a link you'll need pretty soon:
    http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?page=items&cID=1&mID=49

    I ordered the two heavier-strength recoil springs and the 3-spring hammer kit. That should let me tailor the gun's response to a handload and adjust the trigger pull to suit my stiff old fingers!
    Jerry

    So I should get the hammer spring kit with three different # springs? And the standard 18lb or extra power recoil spring? Extra power would be better for shooting more stout reloads and is a good replacement for the worn factory 18 ponder? Would 20 # lb be about right? I think I just confused myself.:uhm::uhm:

    Let me take a logical (in my noggin anyhow) approach to this.

    The P-64 has a very heavy trigger pull as it is shipped out, about 25 pounds DA. So the kit with three different # weight hammer springs allows you to use the one most reliable not dangerously light and suited to your personal taste?

    The recoil spring may be worn and shooting stout reloads/modern SD ammo may cause issues and like my .45 a heavier recoil spring will keep the slide from battering so hard and enhance cycling and ejection?

    So Teach, am I right:conehead: or do I need to go to study hall?:tooth:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Big Chief, that range off post with all that brass on the ground sounds like opportunity knocking at your door. Take a rake and sufficient 5 gallon buckets out there to collect the brass. When you get home, separate the brass first by aluminum, steel, and brass. The aluminum and steel cases are recyclable, especially the aluminum. Now to the brass cases.

    Magnifying glass on stand, a good light, and some small quart containers. Separate the brass by chambering, and check each one to make sure it isn't Berdan primed; toss those. The magnifying glass on the stand helps with this a lot. Toss the squished cases in a container for recycling. For the chamberings you use, separate by manufacturer. It's a little bit of work, but will result in lots of new once fired reloadable cases.
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  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Chief, I like to go with the heaviest recoil spring that allows the action to cycle reliably with whatever load I end up using. You're on the mark about a too-light recoil spring; it allows the slide to batter the frame, particularly on a straight blowback system like the P-64 or CZ-82 has. The 3-spring set for the hammer works the same way- - - -use the lightest spring that allows for reliable primer ignition to minimize the trigger pull. Handloads with good small pistol primers will allow a lighter hammer strike than some of the milsurp rounds with hard primers. I'd suggest geting both increased-weight recoil springs and the 3-spring set for the hammer. That's what I did. More info once they arrive and I tinker a little!
    Jerry
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Big Chief, that range off post with all that brass on the ground sounds like opportunity knocking at your door. Take a rake and sufficient 5 gallon buckets out there to collect the brass. When you get home, separate the brass first by aluminum, steel, and brass. The aluminum and steel cases are recyclable, especially the aluminum. Now to the brass cases.

    Magnifying glass on stand, a good light, and some small quart containers. Separate the brass by chambering, and check each one to make sure it isn't Berdan primed; toss those. The magnifying glass on the stand helps with this a lot. Toss the squished cases in a container for recycling. For the chamberings you use, separate by manufacturer. It's a little bit of work, but will result in lots of new once fired reloadable cases.

    Oh, I got some extra brass that day, just not 9X18 MAK! I don't thunk they allow salvaging operations but then again it would improve that place, since they don't seem to bother!
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Chief, I like to go with the heaviest recoil spring that allows the action to cycle reliably with whatever load I end up using. You're on the mark about a too-light recoil spring; it allows the slide to batter the frame, particularly on a straight blowback system like the P-64 or CZ-82 has. The 3-spring set for the hammer works the same way- - - -use the lightest spring that allows for reliable primer ignition to minimize the trigger pull. Handloads with good small pistol primers will allow a lighter hammer strike than some of the milsurp rounds with hard primers. I'd suggest geting both increased-weight recoil springs and the 3-spring set for the hammer. That's what I did. More info once they arrive and I tinker a little!
    Jerry


    Thanks, sounds like a good plan. I've used Wolff Spring kits before, years ago, I think they were color coded for different # weights.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
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