What is your routine when getting ready for a hunt.....

orchidmanorchidman Senior MemberPosts: 7,570 Senior Member
.....by routine, what do you do,if anything, to stack the odds in your favour.

I always make sure my hunting clothing has been washed in something like sportwash to kill all laundry scents and to remove all ultra violet enhancers. My hunting clothes , when washed get kept in a separate wardrobe with some fresh pine needles to keep them smelling natural.

I always shower beforehand without soap or any scented products and take care not to come in contact with any form of detergent or household chemicals.

Toothpaste is a no no as well as flavoured gum etc.....
If I am going to have a cooked breakfast I have it before I shower so as not to 'carry' any cooking smells.

I never use any form of gun oil etc on the gun I am taking, and always give it a rub down to remove excess oil the day before.
Oh, and I always fill the petrol tank the night before so I dont smell like a gas station ....

I dont use any kind of masking scent. I figure the 4-5 cigarettes I normally smoke while driving to the location is enough 'masking'.......:bang: :rotflmao:

Just wondering how many of you do something similar......

I do have a lucky pair of socks that I normally wear...........I call them lucky cos if I find 2 socks that match I know I am going to have a good day.........

(Some people are sceptical about using scent/UV enhancer free detergent on hunting clothes, but since I started using it quite a few years ago, my success rate has climbed dramatically. Even Bloodhound now uses it as do most of my hunting companions...)
Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....

Replies

  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,343 Senior Member
    I keep my hunting cloths at the camp so they don't even come in contact with my other cloths. I have a room on the property so I don't have to travel far in the morning. On the night before, we all get together (usually four to six of us) and determine which way the wind will be blowing so that we have an Idea as to which area each of us will be hunting. In the morning, I poke my head outside to see if the wind direction is what I expected and if so, I make a big cup of coffee, throw a sandwich, some snacks, and a couple bottles of water in my pack, and head out.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,162 Senior Member
    I use wool hunting clothes so they get dry cleaned at the end of the season and then I store them in a heavy duty trash bag with pine boughs I collect from the area around where we hunt. I store my fanny pack with all of my stuff that I carry, my socks, my hat, my gloves, and long underwear in with the boughs also and then I leave them outside in a tote when I get back to the shack. I also use the odor neutralizing wash on anything I can run through the washing machine. My breath is what it is at the hunting shack:tooth:, I avoid tooth paste in the morning. I do drink coffee in my stand but I apply a liberal dose of "Doe in Heat" on my window sills in my stand in addition to some wicks I hang in the trees.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 27,818 Senior Member
    I plan on getting everything ready and ship shape for about 3 months previous to the date. Then on the actual date I run around like a chiken with the head cut off rummaging through my hunting clothing closet and gun room looking for all the stuff I was planning on gathering for the last three months. I then have to do with whatever I find first. I normally get to my hunting spot about 1-2 hours later than I planned and then find out I forgot most of the crap I wanted to bring. Then I settle in for my hunt and remember that just being here is all that matters. Everything else is incidental.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,158 Senior Member
    Thirty years of slipping around in the woods, doing the old-fashioned type of land surveying, has led me to believe that nothing matters much except wind direction and being quiet. I have inadvertently walked up on nearly every kind of wild animal (in East Texas) while walking quietly in remote areas.

    I do wear camo and I don't smoke my stinky old cheap cigars, but other than that, I don't obsess too much about it.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 23,920 Senior Member
    I get up, drink a half pot of coffee with breakfast, and then put on my camo coveralls, boots, and gloves. The coveralls are in a bag of leaves out on the front porch to give them that moldy leaf smell. Walk up the ridge to my tree stand, which is a couple hundred yards from the house. Get up about 20-25 feet with the climbing stand, strap in, and drink more coffee. Drop some of the bag of microwaved buttered popcorn I brought down below the stand if a squirrel or chipmunk shows up. They think it's pretty good stuff. Wait for a deer to come up the ridge, and if one shows up, shoot it. Drop my cigarette butts in the gallon milk jug attached to the stand for the 'call of nature'. Being that high up in the tree stand, the deer don't notice the cigarette smoke; shot too many with a cigarette lit and hanging in my mouth when I pulled the trigger. I also have a small day pack filled with bottled water and stuff to eat; it's hard work settin' up there doin' nothin'.

    If a deer shows up and I shoot it, I field dress it where it dropped, and tag it with a kill tag. Then back to the house to get the tractor with the utility box on the 3-point hitch, and drive up the ridge road to the deer, or as close as I can get, load it up and bring it down to the truck. Transfer deer to truck and take it 5 miles to the processor's place. Go home, take a nap, and get up for an evening hunt.

    And that's how my hunt goes. Unless I hunt across the creek; I take a pair of rubber boots with me to cross the creek, and leave them on the other side after I've crossed, and put my boots back on.
    I may be a Deplorable, but at least I'm not a Liberal!!!



  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    I am to anal so listing it all would be boring so - "ALL OF THE ABOVE"
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,227 Senior Member
    Routine? Hmmmm, that's a tough one.

    I'll let you know as soon as I have one.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,815 Senior Member
    I have three general ones that have several variables.
    It also depends on the type of hunting I am doing (revolver, specialty handgun, or bow)
    #1 Day hunting around here for mule deer, antelope or whitetail
    #2 Day hunting in the mountains.
    #3 Multiple days in the mountains
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,141 Senior Member
    I step out the back door in whatever clothes I can grab from the closet, fire up the 4-wheeler, and drive to within a couple of hundred yards of whatever stand I plan to use that day. If I see a deer on the way, I shoot it, field-dress it, load it onto the rig and head back to the barn for some home processing. I file a kill report on the internet, and usually get the meat into the freezer within 5 or 6 hours of it being on the hoof. Sometimes I go for days or weeks without a kill, but it's usually my fault for not getting out in the woods at the right time of day. I don't think clothes or rituals have much effect on the outcome.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,445 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I plan on getting everything ready and ship shape for about 3 months previous to the date. Then on the actual date I run around like a chiken with the head cut off rummaging through my hunting clothing closet and gun room looking for all the stuff I was planning on gathering for the last three months. I then have to do with whatever I find first. I normally get to my hunting spot about 1-2 hours later than I planned and then find out I forgot most of the crap I wanted to bring. Then I settle in for my hunt and remember that just being here is all that matters. Everything else is incidental.

    That is about my way of doing it as well. Also, if it's cold, I usually have the hot weather gear on. If it's hot, I have the cold weather gear on.

    But since my blind is bigger and better appointed that an $800/month apartment in NYC, I survive quite well.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,376 Senior Member
    Wash my stuff, the wifes stuff and the kids stuff in a scent away wash a couple nights before. Not imperative with the rifles, but it was a staple with the bow. Try to make sure everyone has their lic and gear with their flo orange the night before.

    Fall out of bed, drink coffee, eat something and go into the basement. Listen to the tribe ask me where :1, are my bullets? 2, is my lic 3, where are my boots, 4, ect ect as I get dressed and walk out the door with coffee and snacks in my fanny pack. They are getting better at understanding that at 0 hour, I am going hunting.

    edit;
    I also find my green flannel lined canvas shirt to wear. The one the Brown Lab chewed on when he was a pup? It seems I have had more luck wearing that then not, so I made it my lucky shirt. As a bonus, if it is real cold and I get the sleeves bloody, I don't care.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,289 Senior Member
    Get up, have coffee, figure out whare I'm gonna hunt that day, stick my head out the door to see what the weather is like, go out to the wash house, dress appropriately, grab a gun and go hunting...much simpler process now than it used to be...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,948 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I plan on getting everything ready and ship shape for about 3 months previous to the date. Then on the actual date I run around like a chicken with the head cut off rummaging through my hunting clothing closet and gun room looking for all the stuff I was planning on gathering for the last three months. I then have to do with whatever I find first. I normally get to my hunting spot about 1-2 hours later than I planned and then find out I forgot most of the crap I wanted to bring. Then I settle in for my hunt and remember that just being here is all that matters. Everything else is incidental.

    LMAO I'm not quite that bad, but you say what really matters at the end. That's exactly how I feel about it. :up:
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,409 Senior Member
    Lay my gear out the night before, then in the morning have my lucky breakfast and go.
    This message has been deleted
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,427 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    Thirty years of slipping around in the woods, doing the old-fashioned type of land surveying, has led me to believe that nothing matters much except wind direction and being quiet. I have inadvertently walked up on nearly every kind of wild animal (in East Texas) while walking quietly in remote areas.

    I do wear camo and I don't smoke my stinky old cheap cigars, but other than that, I don't obsess too much about it.
    :agree: For gun hunting, especially.

    I used to do all the scent routines, didn't help. Now, even when I'm bowhunting, I keep my camo's in my work truck, which is on an excavating job site every day. I spray down with scent killer every couple days, forget about it. I had a herd of 22 does/fawns come in on me last year, not one of them busted me. They were all over, in front, under, behind, sides, everywhere. I'm starting to wonder how much of the whole scent thing is advertising hype.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,269 Senior Member
    I wash my hunting clothes in unscented detergent and I take a bath in unscented soap such as regular Ivory bath soap, you know, the one that floats, or I buy some special bar soap at Academy. I also have special deoderant that just covers body odor but isn't scented. Around south Texas and around most of the state there are many oil fields that mask any oil odor or gasoline odor. There's compressors and stations all out in the boonies here and deer and hogs live right on top of and amongst all that. But the main thing I do is shoot my rifles one more time before I go to insure they're on and I also sharpen my knives, both the one for gutting and the one for skinning.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,343 Senior Member
    I used to be on the fence about scent control as the people I knew that were into it usually had other problems with their hunting techniques and thought that using scent control products would make them a better hunter. About five or six years ago I started hunting with a different group and a few of them actually had pretty good woodcraft skills and were pretty good hunters. I noticed that although all of them harvested quite a few animals each season, the couple guys that had good woodcraft skills and controlled their scents consistently hung larger animals. I notice it more with hogs than deer where I hunt. If I'm jacked way up in a tree and watching an older deer, waiting for it to graze into pistol range, if it gets a whif of me it may get edgy at first at the odd odor and try to figure out the source and then finally leave. If a hog gets an odd scent, it won't raise it's nose and sniff around trying to figure it out. It just bolts. I have some food plots that I won't sit in because the wind swirls around in them and spreads any odors in the field. I'll stay down the road and walk up and check them every little while.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • FoxGary270FoxGary270 New Member Posts: 5 New Member
    I went to an NRA Whitetail Conference a few years ago and it was excellent. They covered everything you needed to do to hunt successfully.

    Me I sight my 270 in carefully 1 month before the season starts. My BP also. Then I go scout the area I want to hunt for signs of rubs or scrapes. I watch for does n bucks also and tracks and bedding spots. Deer scat. I walk a lot to find the bedding spots. Once found I look for a good place to hide about 100 yards away. The bucks always follow the does. If not I look for where they feed and set up on that corridor someplace.

    The day of the hunt I dress in complete camo head to tail, actually toes. Hat, gloves, and shoes too. I usually find a large tree that has fallen down and sit in the hole so that only my head sticks up. Not being seen is real important. They usually see you before you see them. Up a tree is better but I don't climb well. I get there well before light just in case I rouse the deer. Remember they can see at night even though you cannot see them.

    That NRA "whitetail hunting" book is excellent.

    Things my dad did that do not work. No. 1 smoke. You might as well play a saxaphone in the woods. Carry a zippo lighter to click loudly everytime you smoke. Carry a stainless steel thermous to clank when you drink. I doubt deer like the smell of coffee. Eat sardeens for lunch. same. Move around a lot. Sit out in the open so you can see everything. Dress in red from head to toe so no one shoots you. Santa Claus Syndrome. Talk to you son a lot. Answer your cell phone. Have the cell phone play a jingle when someone calls. Fart, cough, clear throat. Have large BM next to where you sit. Same for P.

    Basically its like the twilight zone, you need to control all the sight, sound, and smell so the deer do not know you are there.

    That "doe in heat" stuff from Tinks works really well. But do like the label says and don't drink it or put it on yourself. lol.

    Gary.
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...I check my pack the nite before & make sure there's TP...

    ...I get up a 1/2hr. earlier than usual in the morning...
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,269 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    I used to be on the fence about scent control as the people I knew that were into it usually had other problems with their hunting techniques and thought that using scent control products would make them a better hunter. About five or six years ago I started hunting with a different group and a few of them actually had pretty good woodcraft skills and were pretty good hunters. I noticed that although all of them harvested quite a few animals each season, the couple guys that had good woodcraft skills and controlled their scents consistently hung larger animals. I notice it more with hogs than deer where I hunt. If I'm jacked way up in a tree and watching an older deer, waiting for it to graze into pistol range, if it gets a whif of me it may get edgy at first at the odd odor and try to figure out the source and then finally leave. If a hog gets an odd scent, it won't raise it's nose and sniff around trying to figure it out. It just bolts. I have some food plots that I won't sit in because the wind swirls around in them and spreads any odors in the field. I'll stay down the road and walk up and check them every little while.

    Fishead, everything you say here is right in line with my thinking too. I too have noticed that those who pay attention to the details seem to bag bigger game. Also, hogs are much more wiery than deer. And whitetail bucks, even younger ones can be pretty edgy. But hogs are like you said. They don't screw around when they get a sniff of something not quite right. Even hunting off the ground (edited: in the air in a raised blind) has proven this to me. That's why if I have a raised blind to hunt from it is usually at least 100 yards from the feeder or food plot as may be the case. Even night hunting proves this out. You have to mask your scent for hogs or you won't even see, much less even kill, the younger ones, much less the mature ones.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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