Home Main Category Hunting

Hog damage!

FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior MemberPosts: 5,797 Senior Member
I'm sure there's a few of you folks that haven't witnessed firsthand what a hog can do to the land so I took a few pictures last weekend. I've mentioned in some previous posts that we've had a hog population explosion on our lease and I also mentioned that we pull our feeders before the hunting season starts. Well with the feeders gone, the hogs are starting to root up the greenfields and it's amazing how much damage they can do in a short amount of time. The particular field in this pic is about 110yds square and they dug up about a third of it in a week and a half. My camera's have shown four adults and six piglets in this area so it didn't take a huge herd to do this. Imagine what they can do to a farmers crops in that time. They can totally wipe out a rural residents garden overnight.


Magnoliadamage002.jpg
snake284 wrote: »
For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
.
«1

Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Tennessee just relaxed the regs on hunting feral hogs a lot. Can you use extreme methods like night hunting with electronic vision assist, etc. where that damage is happening? It looks like something other than just declaring them vermin is going to be needed.
    Jerry
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    On the hunting lease I had a couple years ago, hogs did this kind of damage to nearly half of a 20 acre fertilized, ready-to-cut hay meadow, in one night. I had driven out from my blind in my Mule one night, and was dodging hog-holes driving back in, less than 12 hours later. It can be a disaster for small ranchers. This was at a time when they were completely nocturnal, due to heavy hunting pressure.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,801 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Tennessee just relaxed the regs on hunting feral hogs a lot. Can you use extreme methods like night hunting with electronic vision assist, etc. where that damage is happening? It looks like something other than just declaring them vermin is going to be needed.
    Jerry
    Not YET in Alabama :nono:

    I have a couple of friends who are game wardens and even they will tell you Alabama's laws regarding hogs are asinine

    They are considered "game animals" until reduced to possession of the hunter and are covered by the same regs as deer.
    Though with one phone call to your district wildlife management office, you, as the land owner (ONLY), can get a predation permit and have it specify using bait, night hunting (lights or NV) and even suppressors and can bring in as many people as you wish, so equipped, to deal with the problem


    Edited to add:
    I've had lengthy discussions with one of them, and we have the idea that they should change the laws so that from April 1 through Oct 1 (after our spring turkey and before bow season) they should make it a COMPLETELY open season, bait, NV the whole shebang. Since there's no deer season open, doing it for those 6 months eliminates "bubba" trying to get out of a charge for baiting deer by saying he was baiting for hogs. Our laws say any "bait" must be gone 10 days prior to hunting, and bow season normally opens around Oct 15, so ending the "hog season" 10/1 gets the legal hog bait removed before it becomes illegal deer bait
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Not YET in Alabama :nono:

    They are considered "game animals" until reduced to possession of the hunter and are covered by the same regs as deer.
    Though with one phone call to your district wildlife management office, you, as the land owner (ONLY), can get a predation permit and have it specify using bait, night hunting (lights or NV) and even suppressors and can bring in as many people as you wish, so equipped, to deal with the problem

    Thank's Paul, you saved me some typing. Unfortunately most of the fields getting tore up by the pigs are on timber company land that we lease so this doesn't apply and we can't even shoot them at night when most of them come out. That's why we keep so many cameras out all year as we try to find area's where the pigs are out in daylight. You only get one or two shots at them and they go nocturnal.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Fat BillyFat Billy Senior Member Posts: 1,813 Senior Member
    Attention:

    The Governor of Georgia Just signed into law the Baiting Bill in the Southern Zone (we are In the Southern Zone) of Georgia. We can Now LEGALLY Hunt DEER AND HOGS over Bait.

    Hogs can Be Hunted ALL Year Long over Bait!

    This is a BIG Change in Georgia Law and will make this Hunting Season even More Enjoyable and Successful


    Regulations



    Residents and nonresidents need a valid hunting license, but no special permit is required. There is no closed season and no limit. Hogs may be harvested during the deer, turkey and small game seasons. If you are hunting during a firearms season, blaze orange must be worn. Hogs may also be hunted at night with a light.



    Read more: Hog Hunting in Georgia | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6311151_hog-hunting-georgia.html#ixzz2DLrclfF8

    I understant the area around Ft Benning and the base itself is over run with ferral hogs. You'd think they would provide free 308 and 223 ammo to help cure the problem. Think what you could do with a M60 and a starlight scope. No shortage of bacon for the military but they don't think that way. I guess claymores are out of the question too. Oh well. :iwo:
    Fat Billy

    Recoil is how you know primer ignition is complete.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Not YET in Alabama :nono:

    I have a couple of friends who are game wardens and even they will tell you Alabama's laws regarding hogs are asinine

    They are considered "game animals" until reduced to possession of the hunter and are covered by the same regs as deer.
    Though with one phone call to your district wildlife management office, you, as the land owner (ONLY), can get a predation permit and have it specify using bait, night hunting (lights or NV) and even suppressors and can bring in as many people as you wish, so equipped, to deal with the problem


    Edited to add:
    I've had lengthy discussions with one of them, and we have the idea that they should change the laws so that from April 1 through Oct 1 (after our spring turkey and before bow season) they should make it a COMPLETELY open season, bait, NV the whole shebang. Since there's no deer season open, doing it for those 6 months eliminates "bubba" trying to get out of a charge for baiting deer by saying he was baiting for hogs. Our laws say any "bait" must be gone 10 days prior to hunting, and bow season normally opens around Oct 15, so ending the "hog season" 10/1 gets the legal hog bait removed before it becomes illegal deer bait

    The problem is: "Too many Bunny Huggers in High Places." Here in Texas even back in the 90s we had this insanity. There was some clown within the heiarchy of the TPWD that suggested putting a limit and seasons on feral hogs. He almost got hung or at least tarred and feathered.

    Reason has prevailed here, although I think only on this issue, simply because of the unpopularity of feral hogs in this state. We have too many people that depend on the land to make their livelyhood for the hog to go unscathed.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • Fat BillyFat Billy Senior Member Posts: 1,813 Senior Member
    I've got it! Let a herd of ferral hogs loose in the Legislature when they are in session you'd get the law before lunch I bet. :applause: Later,
    Fat Billy

    Recoil is how you know primer ignition is complete.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Fat Billy wrote: »
    Attention:

    The Governor of Georgia Just signed into law the Baiting Bill in the Southern Zone (we are In the Southern Zone) of Georgia. We can Now LEGALLY Hunt DEER AND HOGS over Bait.

    Hogs can Be Hunted ALL Year Long over Bait!

    This is a BIG Change in Georgia Law and will make this Hunting Season even More Enjoyable and Successful


    Regulations



    Residents and nonresidents need a valid hunting license, but no special permit is required. There is no closed season and no limit. Hogs may be harvested during the deer, turkey and small game seasons. If you are hunting during a firearms season, blaze orange must be worn. Hogs may also be hunted at night with a light.



    Read more: Hog Hunting in Georgia | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6311151_hog-hunting-georgia.html#ixzz2DLrclfF8

    I understant the area around Ft Benning and the base itself is over run with ferral hogs. You'd think they would provide free 308 and 223 ammo to help cure the problem. Think what you could do with a M60 and a starlight scope. No shortage of bacon for the military but they don't think that way. I guess claymores are out of the question too. Oh well. :iwo:

    Fat Billy, it's interesting you bring this up because deer, when their populations go unchecked can do damage to crops just as well as hogs. The difference is the hog will root up the ground AND hogs are much more prolific at multiplying than deer. But we have had legal baiting of all state controlled species for ever. It not only draws animals out of cover so you can get a shot more easily (The more obvious benefit), but it's overall good for the heard. It makes for a healthier deer population by giving them another protiene source and also by helping manage the heard numbers.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    snake284-1 wrote: »
    The problem is: "Too many Bunny Huggers in High Places." Here in Texas even back in the 90s we had this insanity. There was some clown within the heiarchy of the TPWD that suggested putting a limit and seasons on feral hogs. He almost got hung or at least tarred and feathered.

    Reason has prevailed here, although I think only on this issue, simply because of the unpopularity of feral hogs in this state. We have too many people that depend on the land to make their livelyhood for the hog to go unscathed.
    Yeah, because bunny huggers are so about hunting limits and exploitation...

    Maybe those in charge are just seeing a revenue opportunity and feel that limited harvest would allow the population to grow and then get more revenue through hunting licenses and permits?
    Overkill is underrated.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Yeah, because bunny huggers are so about hunting limits and exploitation...

    Maybe those in charge are just seeing a revenue opportunity and feel that limited harvest would allow the population to grow and then get more revenue through hunting licenses and permits?

    Oh no doubt, the revenue issue is there too. But Austin is full of liberal bunny and tree huggers. And parks and wildlife had its share that infiltrated. It's pretty well known here that this was the case. Also, I'm sure the bunny huggers felt that the revenue issue might help them get insane legislation passed.

    Bunny Huggers, tree huggers, Liberals in general, all pretty much the same type folks are in every level of government.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    Bunny huggers wouldn't allow hunting. They would advocate trapping or darting the problem wildlife and then either relocating them to another area, or sterilizing and releasing them.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Bunny huggers wouldn't allow hunting. They would advocate trapping or darting the problem wildlife and then either relocating them to another area, or sterilizing and releasing them.

    I beg your pardon, but in my most humble opinion, Bunny Huggers will do anything they can to LIMIT hunting.

    Look Bream I know you want me to argue with you, but I'm not. Not on this. It is my firm opinion and unless you can show me some hard evidence, I'm not moving.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    Actually I don't believe it's a "bunny hugger" issue but rather the fish and wildlife people that keep things the way that they are. My apologies to all my friends in Alabama but in all honesty, there are a lot of redneck and unethical hunters in Alabama that wouldn't hesitate to lay down a big buck at night or on a feeder under the pretense of hog hunting. Alabama has a lot of rural area and the game wardens are stretched too thin to look for the source of every night time gunshot. Our place is so rural that cell phones don't get a signal and you rarely see anyone wearing the required orange while they're on the ground. Although I'd like to see the regulations more in line with what Paul described, (I think it's a great idea) I'm sure that a lot of deer would be getting rolled along with the pigs.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    snake284-1 wrote: »
    I beg your pardon, but in my most humble opinion, Bunny Huggers will do anything they can to LIMIT hunting.

    Look Bream I know you want me to argue with you, but I'm not. Not on this. It is my firm opinion and unless you can show me some hard evidence, I'm not moving.

    My hard evidence? Personal interaction I and my colleagues have had with animal rights advocates who have sought to eliminate hunting or fishing. On the other hand, most of the actions we've seen to set limits or seasons on exotics and other non-indigenous animals have been by folks who are working to extend or expand a revenue stream for their agency.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    Actually I don't believe it's a "bunny hugger" issue but rather the fish and wildlife people that keep things the way that they are. My apologies to all my friends in Alabama but in all honesty, there are a lot of redneck and unethical hunters in Alabama that wouldn't hesitate to lay down a big buck at night or on a feeder under the pretense of hog hunting. Alabama has a lot of rural area and the game wardens are stretched too thin to look for the source of every night time gunshot. Our place is so rural that cell phones don't get a signal and you rarely see anyone wearing the required orange while they're on the ground. Although I'd like to see the regulations more in line with what Paul described, (I think it's a great idea) I'm sure that a lot of deer would be getting rolled along with the pigs.
    Then there's that. In FL, hunting hogs on private land is legal, as is hunting deer around feeders. However on state lands hog hunting is limited to deer hunting season due to unethical hunters who will kill a deer and claim they were out hog hunting and "mistook" the deer for a hog.

    It's kind of like the guys who advocate we need to be allowed to keep gut-hooked fish, even if undersized or over the limits. Some of them would shove a hook or lure down a fish's throat just to bring home more.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    My hard evidence? Personal interaction I and my colleagues have had with animal rights advocates who have sought to eliminate hunting or fishing. On the other hand, most of the actions we've seen to set limits or seasons on exotics and other non-indigenous animals have been by folks who are working to extend or expand a revenue stream for their agency.

    Like I said, I have my own opinion about this. I don't trust the opposition. We have seen too many examples of how underhanded and devious they can be. This is in my opinion because they, the Liberal bed rock, have an agenda, and illiminating your and my rights to hunt and fish is part of it, along with our right to keep and bear arms.

    However, I'm not arguing this with you, partly because I feel you are correct in part of what you say. We just differ in the part that I believe the liberal base is a more serious problem than most people believe or understand. So maybe I'm a right wing nutt. If that's your opinion I don't think I'll ever change it. But Like I said, I do agree with what you say about revenues.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    Yeah, the problem always has to be liberals. Can't be anyone else.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    How the hell does politics even come to the forefront of this discussion? For crap's sake...

    Look, states want the revenue stream from selling Big Game licenses for hogs. Also, so do the "outfitters" who try to sell guided hunts to Yankees for these "dangerous" animals.

    They are the ones with pictures on their websites of frothy-mouthed, long-tusked hogs, and cartoon like drawings of Razorbackers with permanent scowls, muscle shirts, and Born To Be Wild tattoos on their biceps.

    Its a big freaking joke. Anybody here ever watched The Pigman on t.v.? How about the episode where he "dumped the clip" into a homicidal 40 lb hog? Good tv, and it sells hunts to those who have no experience with hogs. They're just rats with hooves, but guides and states want the money.

    Until the state loses more in crop damage than they make in ticket sales, expect the hogs to stay on the list as "game".

    Liberals. Nothing to do with it.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    Actually Buffco, what you're talking about IS political. But it's not the traditional Democrat/Republican or Liberal/Conservative political machinations. It's more having to do the what goes on between various user groups and agencies. Part of the issue is, when an agency is funded in part by use, they'll find new uses to increase their revenue streams.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Yeah, you're right, it IS political, but definitely not a left/right thing.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,608 Senior Member
    Exactly.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Like I said, we all have our opinion and this is mine. Can't some of you get used to the idea that all of us might not think you know it all? And if we don't bow down and agree, we're the bad guys or the dummies? Well sorry, that's my opinion and I have lots of learning to believe it. If it don't meet your specs so be it.

    Why is the left winning? the same reason Hitler took over Europe, the same reason the Middle East is what it is. Human nature can cause a lot of strife. Wake up and smell the roses.

    The Anti gun and Anti hunting movement are all about politics and in reality one and the same movement. And today, politics is all about being on the left and/or the right.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    In an attempt to get this Thread back on track to some degree, I'll add this:

    The damage that you see in the photo posted by fisheadgib is just that....VISUAL damage. What you can't see is the direct and intense competition with deer and turkey for food material. I promise you it IS intense. And then there are the diseases that feral hogs introduce and spread. We can go on with examining the damage to various soil organisms that are destroyed. An example: Native Southern Longleaf Pine once covered an estimated 112 million acres in its range from southern Virginia around the Coastal Plains to east Texas close to where Snake is located. Today that acreage has been reduced to maybe a million acres, but no more. Feral hogs will root up freshly planted Longleaf seedlings AND ALL NATIVE SEEDLINGS for 2-3 years after planting for the tender taproot on this species, and there is growing evidence that the hogs are responsible for the reduction of soil organisms under Longleaf stands that are necessary to fix nitrogen and other nutrients on the roots.

    I could go on and on like a broken record, but you get the point. In short, you can have "X" numbers of deer and turkey (and about all other species of wildlife) per acre, or you can have a fraction of this number along with feral hogs! Your choice! Might as well invite Radical Islamic Terrorists home for dinner....same situation!
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    In an attempt to get this Thread back on track to some degree, I'll add this:

    The damage that you see in the photo posted by fisheadgib is just that....VISUAL damage. What you can't see is the direct and intense competition with deer and turkey for food material. I promise you it IS intense. And then there are the diseases that feral hogs introduce and spread. We can go on with examining the damage to various soil organisms that are destroyed. An example: Native Southern Longleaf Pine once covered an estimated 112 million acres in its range from southern Virginia around the Coastal Plains to east Texas close to where Snake is located. Today that acreage has been reduced to maybe a million acres, but no more. Feral hogs will root up freshly planted Longleaf seedlings AND ALL NATIVE SEEDLINGS for 2-3 years after planting for the tender taproot on this species, and there is growing evidence that the hogs are responsible for the reduction of soil organisms under Longleaf stands that are necessary to fix nitrogen and other nutrients on the roots.

    I could go on and on like a broken record, but you get the point. In short, you can have "X" numbers of deer and turkey (and about all other species of wildlife) per acre, or you can have a fraction of this number along with feral hogs! Your choice! Might as well invite Radical Islamic Terrorists home for dinner....same situation!

    I'll admit I can be radical when i speak of the left, however, Woodsrunner, now i know why you're so radical about killing the feral hogs. Thanks for posting this. We all need to know about such things and keep an eye on local legislation to make sure hogs are killed.

    I was already trying to do my part, but now I will shoot everyone I see, no matter if there's a big buck standing next to him/her. I will shoot the hog first.

    Did I mention that I do love Pine Trees?
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Steve, the slob hunters aren't only in the southern part of the state- - - -they regularly mess up our hunting up here in Tennessee. A few years ago an undercover Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency officer was instrumental in getting 13 Huntsville-area poachers nailed to the wall in our neighborhood. He had infiltrated their "hunt club" on leased land in southern Tennessee. They had been baiting, spotlighting, hound hunting, road hunting, trespassing, and doing a lot of other illegal stuff. At the end of the hunting season, he had documented over 150 illegal deer kills, with NONE of them checked in through the proper channels. The owner of the BBQ pit up the road was in cahoots with them, and was mixing venison in with his "Pulled Pork" barbecue! Big fines and equipment confiscations all around, including some lifetime hunting bans in Tennessee!
    Jerry
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    It's sad but true, no one state or area is free of slob hunters with a total lack of ethics. Texas has a BIG share of them. Sometimes I go round and round with Parks and Wildlife, but I will say they did slow illegal hunting and fishing. You have to be brain dead to do that nowdays here. Some still do, but when they get caught they pay triple time.

    Texas Parks and Wildlife Law Enforcement branch is really putting the pressure on. It all started when netting was outlawed for trout and redfish here. The outlaws went into overdrive, but Parks and Wildlife countered by hiring and training more wardens. Back in the 60s and early 70s there were exactly one state game warden in this county. In the 80s when the tough laws were put into place, the number of wardens in this county fluctuated between 10 and 20. There was a big campaign against netting. One of my friends who is now a retired warden, was one of the key players. He would be in his boat with night vision. When he would see the netters pulling in their netts he would idle into range. Then at the opportune moment he would firewall his engines and ram the netters boat. The netters were using nett skiffs of course which have low freeboard. The game warden boat had a massive bow on it with a long rake. It would slide right up on the nett skiff's deck. My friend and an accompliss would hit the boat and jump on the deck with guns drawn before the outlaws had time to dump their fish in the water. The trick was that a gutted and gilled fish will drop to the bottom where a fish with its guts (Air Bladder) in tact would float. So the first thing the outlaws would do is gut and gill their catch incase they had to dump it. No fish-no evidence.

    Anyway, having said all that, that campaign got the numbers of wardens up in the state. Today, we only have 4 or 5 regular wardens in the county. In high activity times such as opening day of duck season or during shrimping season, they will borrow wardens from other areas to send to traditionally troubled spots (Like here in Calhoun County) and we may have 10-20 wardens here for a short time. However, having 5 wardens makes the odds of getting caught doing illegal activity a good bit higher than with one or two. Also, I don't know about in other states, but here a sheriff's deputy or even a Texas Hiway Patrol officer can issue citations and make arrests for wildlife offenses. That increases the number of LEOs patroling the bays, farms and ranches on the job a good bit. My son in law is a deputy and he communicates with the game wardens during his shift. If a warden has to go out in the boonies, my son in law and his cohorts can watch the local fishing piers and boat launches and free the wardens up to check up on hunters. More LEOs and much bigger fines has wisened up many an outlaw.

    But there's always going to be a certain element who will try to pull the wool over the LEOs eyes and get away with murder. It's a challenge some cannot avoid, no matter how great the risk or how large the fine.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    Woodsrunner is absolutely right. We have a couple of guys that think it's cool to have so many hogs as they have that much more game to hunt but I spend quite a bit more time in the woods than most of the other members and I'm seeing about two thirds or so of the number of deer that I saw last year. On my cameras I'll see deer feeding alongside racoons, turkeys, possums, squirrels, rabbits, almost any other critter in the woods but not pigs. When the pigs show up, the deer leave. We have eight members and everyone has to keep two feeders out during the closed season and I personally buy 400lbs of feed every three weeks and I don't spend that money to feed pigs. As buffy said, they're just rats with hooves.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,801 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    Thank's Paul, you saved me some typing.
    You're quite welcome :beer: I figure info I get straight from an Alabama game warden would suffice, even though I ain't you :tooth:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,801 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    Although I'd like to see the regulations more in line with what Paul described, (I think it's a great idea) I'm sure that a lot of deer would be getting rolled along with the pigs.
    Another "good" thing about those 6 months, bucks have shed their antlers at the beginning, and most aren't fully developed by its end.
    Kind of hard to take "trophies" that have have grown horns
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    I'm sorry to say that I've met quite a few people that wanted to knock down every deer they see weather they have antlers or not. Several years ago we were sitting around the campfire talking about the large number of deer along the highway going into Selma at night and one of the guys said "the best we ever got was 12". One of my friend asked "all you saw was 12? We probably see at least 30 or 40 every time we drive through there." The guy answered " I mean the most we ever shot was 12!" Road hunting seems to be a popular pastime in the southeast.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement