Fruits and vegitables ??

Big Al1Big Al1 Senior MemberPosts: 7,010 Senior Member
Are my taste buds getting old or do the fruits and vegis' I buy in the store these days actually have no flavor!! Except for citrus fruits or bananas, everyhting else seems bland and tastless, or don't taste good at all!!

Replies

  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member Posts: 8,337 Senior Member
    Nah, you're just old.
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,904 Senior Member
    A lot of stuff is bland, red cabbage we use in salad is good right now.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,821 Senior Member
    The reason they have no taste is caused by several things. First, they are nearly all hybrids with disease resistance and fast growth the primary factors the hybrid exists. Second, they are grown in marginal soil, fertilized with chemical fertilizer, and picked when they aren't ripe yet.

    Vegetables grown from old heirloom seed stock have better flavor. Fertilizing with chikkin, moo cow, or horse poop worked into the ground is more better fertilizer as it has a wider range of nutrients in it. Picking at peak ripeness helps ensure better flavor, too.

    Fruit is picked early, too. Hasn't had time for the fruit to ripen and the sugars to reach peak.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Mike has pretty well nailed it down....a usual occurance for him!

    You might be better off NOT being able to taste the vegetables that you eat.....the bonding material in commercial fertilizers is the solidified sludge out of the sewage systems of, primarily, Chicago and Milwaukee :vomit: These two cities are favored by the commercial fertilizer industry because there are less heavy metals that have to be removed.

    In addition to the reasons cited by Mike, you may add the new proceedure ie GMO which denotes Genetically Modified Organism. Injecting spliced genes into vegetables to prevent diseases and insects from hitting the plant, or to make the vegetable resistant to glyposate (brand name Round-Up) so weeds can be more easily controlled. These things probably affect flavor, and there is a lot of concern both valid and probably non-valid that this gene splicing-injecting may also have a negative impact on your health. Just last week Poland became the 51st nation in the world to outlaw the importation of GMO seeds or plants.

    I grow organically for the local markets. I try to stick with old heirloom seeds, and all of my fertilizer and pesticides are certified "organic". Latest figures show that 68% of all Americans are overweight, and over 35% are obese. I'm convinced it's in our food production methods, and not "lack of exercise" as the food industry wants you to believe. Look at old photos of people pre 1950 and find me 5% who are overweight!

    Big Al1.....there is a very good Farmers market in Panama City that sells on the week-end. There are several local organic growers who sell there. Maybe you ought to find it and sample what the "O" growers have to offer!
  • bruchibruchi Senior Member Posts: 2,582 Senior Member
    DAY AND NIGHT the difference from what you pick up at the supermarket and stuff just from the vine or earth that is not grown for commercial ends, those here that have a vegetable garden can confirm this. We are doing a great job in poisoning ourselves by trading quality for ease and convenience, a good clue to consider is that the more plastic involved in wrapping the stuff the worst it is going to be for you.
    If this post is non welcomed, I can always give you a recipe for making "tostones".
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,821 Senior Member
    I'm not worried about zombies, but GMO crops scare me something bad. Rice has been modified with human liver genes for the production of pharmaceuticals. Other crops have been modified with fish genes, among others, for other purposes. Not talking laboratory tests of small samples, but thousands of acres of the stuff. It's insanely STUPID to do this. Cross pollination has already occurred with some GMO and non GMO crops like corn and soybeans. They keep messing around with GMOs and Soylent Green will no longer be the title of a science fiction book and movie.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,010 Senior Member
    Big Al1.....there is a very good Farmers market in Panama City that sells on the week-end. There are several local organic growers who sell there. Maybe you ought to find it and sample what the "O" growers have to offer!

    I've been there a few times, but they moved to the other side of the bridge into tourist country, which I avoid like leprosy.
    I quit buying anything imported from south of the border, that stuff was just horrible. I shop mostly at the base commisary.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,904 Senior Member
    Commissary gets vegs from all over the world now that
    they are all consolidated, south of the border as well.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,327 Senior Member
    We still have "traditional taste" veggies & fruits down here, probably due to the "primitive" agricultural system still going. Same thing in Chile, where agriculture is a lot more industrialized than ours.

    The fruit & veggies that we tasted in the US last Summer seemed to me the same as always; wife went ape over assorted fresh berries bought at a Publix close to our hotel (Don't know if they were "US made" or imported) and found them great, not unlike those she eats fresh from the tree in her family's orchard back in an agricultural valley north of Santiago.

    Only place I've been severely disappointed from the looks/taste ratio of this kind of food was in Cuba. Watermelon, bananas, apples and oranges (We usually eat a lot of fruit for breakfast) looked like out of a painting, but tasted like wet newspaper; food quality was overall poor despite being in a top-notch hotel from an European chain, but that's another story.
  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member Posts: 8,337 Senior Member
    The local farmers' market is where it's at. Ours opens in April and stays until November, and that's where we get most of our veggies, melons, fruits and jams. Can't beat it.

    Oh, also fresh honey and sometimes maple syrup and breads. Mmmmm.....
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,369 Senior Member
    In California it seems like a lot more vegetables are from Mexico and just have no taste especially the tomatoes, we were given some tomatoes from friends in North Dakota and must say were the best I have ever had. I saved the seeds and will be planting them this year.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Hope the North Dakota tomatoes work out for you, but there is a chance these won't set fruit and produce. Tomatoes are highly sensitive to night time temperatures, and if your average night time temp is significantly more or less than where the tomatoes originated, you probably won't get fruit to set. Give it a try though!
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,056 Senior Member
    Home grown out of the garden or from select vendors at the farm market is where it is at. Right now at the end of winter here in Michigan, all we get is imported stuff from out of the state or country. It is back to stuff that keeps awhile (carrots, onions, potatoes, rutabagas, turnips, etc.) for any local produce the rest is pretty lame this time of year. We would normally have some good apples still, but our crop was horrible last year. There is nothing left of those and we have to get them shipped in from Washington.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,590 Senior Member
    Latest figures show that 68% of all Americans are overweight, and over 35% are obese. I'm convinced it's in our food production methods, and not "lack of exercise" as the food industry wants you to believe. Look at old photos of people pre 1950 and find me 5% who are overweight!

    I'd venture to guess there is one single factor that if eliminated would go a heck of a long way towards solving that issue...high fructose corn syrup. The stuff is in everything! The quantity of soda and other drinks we consume loaded with that stuff adds thousands of calories a week to the diet of a large chunk of the population.

    My solution to the problem is I eat almost zero fresh fruit of veggies. It's terrible I know and I've been trying to get at least a bit better lately, but the wife and I rarely cook complete meals at home, and unless we go to a nicer restaurant there's rarely an option at most restaurants that includes real veggies (not iceberg lettuce and some diced tomatoes drenched in ranch dressing).
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,821 Senior Member
    I'd venture to guess there is one single factor that if eliminated would go a heck of a long way towards solving that issue...high fructose corn syrup. The stuff is in everything! The quantity of soda and other drinks we consume loaded with that stuff adds thousands of calories a week to the diet of a large chunk of the population.

    Back when I was growing up, it was two eggs, sausage or bacon, biscuits with jelly, and a big glass of whole unpasteurized milk for breakfast. And more often than not, gravy made from the sausage or bacon fat. Lunch at home was a big meal, and supper generally leftovers with something new thrown in. And I ate a LOT. Anything fried was fried in hog lard made during hog killin' in the fall. And lard was used for baking, too.

    Difference between then and now is that I had plenty of chores to do, and worked pretty hard during the day; most everyone I knew also worked hard during the day. A heavy dose of physical labor will work off most of what you ate and built muscle. That's the difference between then and now; back then, couch potatoes were an anomaly.

    And 'junk food' did not make up much of anyone's diet back then, either. But homemade cakes, pies, and cookies were available.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,052 Senior Member
    25-30 years ago, parents felt much safer letting their kids be kids: ride bikes, play in the front yard, climb trees, football or baseball games down at the local playground.

    Nowadays, not so much.

    In my case, I think the very protective dog that we always had with us probably played into that safety. She watched folks she didn't trust, and if someone got bit, they probably shouldn't have been provoking the dog...
    Overkill is underrated.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    alpha, you are truly an enigma! You recognize the fact that high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a major contributor to "Obese America", and you avoid it as you should! Yet, you will not eat those vegetables and fruits that you KNOW are good for your health :roll:!

    Now a few words about HFCS: As alpha correctly points out this has become a staple in our diet and the reasons behind this are pure sickening! Virtually all beef that is consumed in the USA is now "grain-fed" in feed lots and not pastured as cattle should be. The grain is corn, and corn contains high amounts of fructose, one of the 8 sugars found in plants (in varing amounts-fairly high in corn). Fructose puts "blubber fat" on cattle and not the "marbled fat" that is desirable in beef. The fructose is chemically removed from the corn fed to cattle and, being super sweet and in abundance, is added to many other food/drink items consumed by the American people. The food industry is pouring the HFCS into people causing them to put on "blubber fat". Don't ever doubt that the food industry is a hellova lot more interested in your checkbook than it is your health! And the government's role in all of this? Forget it........
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,590 Senior Member
    alpha, you are truly an enigma! You recognize the fact that high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a major contributor to "Obese America", and you avoid it as you should! Yet, you will not eat those vegetables and fruits that you KNOW are good for your health :roll:!

    Now a few words about HFCS: As alpha correctly points out this has become a staple in our diet and the reasons behind this are pure sickening! Virtually all beef that is consumed in the USA is now "grain-fed" in feed lots and not pastured as cattle should be. The grain is corn, and corn contains high amounts of fructose, one of the 8 sugars found in plants (in varing amounts-fairly high in corn). Fructose puts "blubber fat" on cattle and not the "marbled fat" that is desirable in beef. The fructose is chemically removed from the corn fed to cattle and, being super sweet and in abundance, is added to many other food/drink items consumed by the American people. The food industry is pouring the HFCS into people causing them to put on "blubber fat". Don't ever doubt that the food industry is a hellova lot more interested in your checkbook than it is your health! And the government's role in all of this? Forget it........

    Oh I didn't say I avoid it, but I do try to limit my intake...I still eat some sugary snacks, usually drink about 1 can of soda a day and drink a good bit of fruit juice that I know is often spiked with the stuff (I try to by brands that have more natural fruit juice and sugars but they come at a price). The issue with fruits and veggies is that I don't usually get home from work until after 7 most nights and by that time I don't really want to cook so it's often something frozen or simple to make. We only make it to the store once every couple of weeks and a lot of fresh stuff goes bad within a week and is best within a couple days. Canned and frozen stuff are an option, but I'm not a big fan of most of that stuff. BTW my mom is a nutrition teacher and great cook who used to cook big, complete meals for us nearly every night growing up and cringes whenever she visits and looks in our cupboards and fridge. I know how to eat right, it just takes a lot of time, money, and effort and hasn't been a top priority.

    The issues with corn is we've got so incredibly efficient at growing the stuff in massive, engineered monocultures and us crazy chemical engineers have gotten really good at engineering it into a huge range of food like substances that actually taste pretty good. A really interesting study would be to analyze the fraction of calories consumed by Americans that originated as corn (including meat grown with corn feed). It's got to be a staggering percentage. If you add in soy, wheat and potatoes you're probably well past 75-80%. It may not be healthy but it's uber cheap and that's what matters because that's what we can easily measure. How much food costs and how it tastes are what people can easily see, taste, and understand. How the food we eat affects our health is an abstract subject with high uncertainty. Hard to get people to pay extra for abstract benefits they can't easily see or understand no matter how much research backs it up.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
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