Reloading

Freedom FighterFreedom Fighter MemberPosts: 47 Member
I have been thinking about reloading ammo, it seems like the way to go nowadays. I'm ready to buy a kit today, I would like a good kit to start off with but the problem is I don't know what kits to stay away from if any and what kits are the ones to look for. I know you get what you pay for in this world, I just don't want to spend money on something that isn't worth it. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Support the 2nd amendment. :guns:
"We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately." -Ben Franklin

Replies

  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,668 Senior Member
    RCBS, Redding, Hornady and even some LEE equipment will probably do for starters. As you learn more and gain experience reloading you may find that you like _____'s dies, ________'s scale etc better than ______'s.

    I have ended up with a "duke's mixture" of brands on the reloading bench over the years.

    Be forewarned that with the current hysteria, components can be rather difficult to find right now. I can imagine it would be quite frustrating to buy a new reloading set up and not be able to load any ammo because you can't find the powder/primer/bullets/cases you need.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,500 Senior Member
    I would highly recommend the RCBS supreme kit. Might as well get good stuff in the beginning, it will save you money down the road.
  • Freedom FighterFreedom Fighter Member Posts: 47 Member
    so would it better to just hold off right now in hope that these ridiculous prices on ammo start to fall? Believe me I rather hold onto my money. truth be told, I guess i'm trying to save some money now on the sky high prices of ammo and was hoping to make a little bit on the side by making some. I'm guessing everyone else has the same master plan!
    Support the 2nd amendment. :guns:
    "We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately." -Ben Franklin
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,263 Senior Member
    After 30+ yeas of reloading, I can definitely say that saving money by reloading isn't a worthy goal. Even when components are plentiful, any savings just go down the barrel as being able to shoot more. Nowadays, it's probably a toss-up as to whether handloading costs less in the long run over buying factory ammo. If you get really deep into the hobby and start casting your own bullets the cost can come down considerably, but cast bullet loads aren't suitable for some types of shooting and/or some guns. I've got probably $2K worth of reloading gear or more, but a lot of mine was acquired used in various horsetrades, ebay purchases, flea markets, etc. Presses and dies, and other hard parts virtually never wear out, so over a few decades, the setup costs get amortized. Don't give in to the temptation to jump off the deep end with a fancy "progressive" press setup. A single stage press or a simple turret system will produce enough ammo to keep you supplied, and you're not likely to need the huge volumes of mediocre-quality ammo that a progressive press makes unless you participate in one of the rapid-fire hobbies like Cowboy Action.

    Edit: Reloading for anyone other than yourself can involve some pretty heavy liability. My son, my SIL and I all shoot my handloads, but we're not likely to sue each other over a dud round or an accidental overload. Also, some handloads that are tailored to a specific firearm might not be accurate, or safe when fired from another one chambered for the same round.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,668 Senior Member
    I guess i'm trying to save some money now on the sky high prices of ammo and was hoping to make a little bit on the side by making some. I'm guessing everyone else has the same master plan!
    If you're talking about reloading ammo to sell, that's a whole 'nother ball of wax. You're going to need an FFL IIRC PLUS a WHOLE BUNCH of liability insurance.

    And until you can get the components you need to load your own, you might consider shopping used equipment piece by piece to save more $$ while waiting on manufacturers to catch up with demand.

    Before you buy ANY equipment, I'd suggest buying AND READING the introductory section of the Lyman reloading manual
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/217655/lyman-reloading-handbook-49th-edition-reloading-manual-softcover

    I've heard good things about the introductory part of the LEE manual as well, but I've never read it personally
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/639649/lee-modern-reloading-2nd-edition-revised-reloading-manual

    Though some folks have complained that the LEE manual has a whole lot of "LEE is better" propaganda in it. Again, no first hand knowledge of that manual
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • guinnessguinness Member Posts: 62 Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Edit: Reloading for anyone other than yourself can involve some pretty heavy liability. My son, my SIL and I all shoot my handloads, but we're not likely to sue each other over a dud round or an accidental overload.
    Jerry

    Heed that advise. I don't even let my friends shoot my handloads. God forbid my one mistake in a load occur with someone else shooting. If someone was injured, it would be on my conscience forever. As for selling reloads "Fah-get aboud it!"
  • guinnessguinness Member Posts: 62 Member
    Teach wrote: »
    After 30+ yeas of reloading, I can definitely say that saving money by reloading isn't a worthy goal. Even when components are plentiful, any savings just go down the barrel as being able to shoot more.
    Jerry

    Agreed. Any savings I might have thought I would see, went down the barrel. I save about 50% on average reloading, and shoot 75% more. So I actually spend more shooting than I did before reloading! That said, I still save 50% of what I do shoot.
  • guinnessguinness Member Posts: 62 Member
    You already have plenty of good advice already, but I'll chime in with my 2 cents:
    Reload as a relaxing hobby or for the pride and satisfaction of loading your own or for finding that perfect load that your weapons like best; but not for saving money. If you do end up saving a little money, that's iceing on the cake.
  • JLDickmonJLDickmon Senior Member Posts: 1,726 Senior Member
    guinness wrote: »
    You already have plenty of good advice already, but I'll chime in with my 2 cents:
    Reload as a relaxing hobby or for the pride and satisfaction of loading your own or for finding that perfect load that your weapons like best; but not for saving money. If you do end up saving a little money, that's iceing on the cake.
    what he said.

    and don't try to sell your reloads to a buddy.
    even giving them away is a bad idea.

    One kaboom and you've got a widow suing your keister into the poor house.

    best way to handle that, is to get your buddy into reloading, too. Have him chip in on the supplies and components, and give him a key to the garage.
    Never laugh at your wife's choices.
    You are one of them.
  • RiflemannRiflemann Member Posts: 269 Member
    RCBS, Buy the best you can afford the first time, it will last the rest of your life. Worry about reloading enough for you instead of this idea you can make some extra money, Besides you need an FFL to sell ammo.
  • Freedom FighterFreedom Fighter Member Posts: 47 Member
    Thank you all for the advice, and the wealth of knowledge. I can honestly say I'm simply at a crossroads with this shortage of ammo crap. I wanted to start reloading simply for me. I bought a few boxes of 5.56 from arms list and when I was there he was trying to sell me some of his hand loads witch sparked a potential law suit of an idea.
    I still would like to learn this trade, because I see this thing getting a whole lot worse before and if it gets any better.
    Support the 2nd amendment. :guns:
    "We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately." -Ben Franklin
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,836 Senior Member
    Build your own ammo....it's rewarding and fun...trying to make it a profitable enterprise makes it work...the fun factor disappears quickly...particularly when you blow up some other guys gun... Respectfully, you've got a lot of learning to do before you start thinking about putting yourself in that kind of situation.

    Please note, there are only two people in the world whose reloads I would run through my guns....and I would trust those guys with my life....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,492 Senior Member
    so would it better to just hold off right now in hope that these ridiculous prices on ammo start to fall? Believe me I rather hold onto my money. truth be told, I guess i'm trying to save some money now on the sky high prices of ammo and was hoping to make a little bit on the side by making some. I'm guessing everyone else has the same master plan!

    I've been reloading for over 50 years, I never use someones reloads, nor do I let someone use mine, way to many variables, If I build, rebarrel etc. for a customer and he wants me to work up a load i will.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • sarg1csarg1c Senior Member Posts: 1,705 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    I've been reloading for over 50 years, I never use someones reloads, nor do I let someone use mine, way to many variables, If I build, rebarrel etc. for a customer and he wants me to work up a load i will.

    JAY
    jay, good post. I never reload for anyone or use anyone's reload. I call it one of the main saftey rules for reloading...
  • SteelshooterSteelshooter New Member Posts: 11 New Member
    Thought I might add a little to the conversation here. I don't often get a chance to post on forums so please take this with a grain of salt. RCBS makes some wonderful reloading equipment and if you can afford it you won't go wrong, it will last you a lifetime. If however you find that is just not in the checkbook take a look at the Lee Aniversery Kit. It has everything your going to need to get started at a very small investment. As you get into reloading you will undoubtedly want to upgrade but it's a good place to start. If you can afford it get the RCBS you'll save money in the long run.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,487 Senior Member
    +1 with Steelshooter. I started with the Aniversary kit and still use most of it today. I've made thousands of rounds with it and though I have a RCBS rock chucker on the shelf I haven't mounted it in over five years I've owned it.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • guinnessguinness Member Posts: 62 Member
    Unless you are going to do a real lot of reloading and are very particular, any of the name brands, Lee, RCBS, Hornady, etc. will do just fine. IMHO
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,552 Senior Member
    You have heard from the experts, but I'll offer my standard opinion about equipment. I like RCBS, but Lee presses and dies are OK, too, at a much lower price. Be particular about your scale and/or powder thrower - RCBS suits me fine. Other than that, be very methodical and don't become distracted while measuring powder or setting your seating die for the proper depth. Read instruction books, and then come back here for questions you can't resolve on your own.

    Hand loading can be almost as satisfying as shooting, but you likely won't save money.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,588 Senior Member
    To me it depends on what you want to reload for and why. I just started about a year and a half ago thinking I was going to reload for most of my collection. In that short time I've realized that it's just not worth it for me to reload for anything that I can buy for under .50 a round. I'm sure as i reload more I'll pick up speed, but it just takes too much time for it to be worth it to me to reload for anything cheaper. If I had more time and less money that balance might shift a bit though. I do enjoy reloading for rifles, working up a load and seeing it perform. That to me is the main reason to reload.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.