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The internet cira 1995

SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior MemberPosts: 5,463 Senior Member
Man, it is hard to believe that computers used to look like that! I had a Commodore 64 once upon a time....

Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
Wambli Ska wrote: »
I'm in love with a Glock

Replies

  • terminator012terminator012 Senior Member Posts: 3,930 Senior Member
    The first computer I bought for the home was 98. Top of the line Dell desktop. I paid 2400.00 dollars for it and it had the biggest hard drive at the time, 2 gigs. Now 2 gigs is nothing.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    I had a Tandy 1000 with no hard drive. You had to operate off the disc and your RAM pretty well dictated how much you could do. You plugged in your DOS boot disc and after your computer booted up, you could plug in your program disc. My second computer (which I still have and it still works) was a Compaq laptop that operated off of DOSSHELL. In around 98 I finally got something with windows.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    I still remember when the "Big Three" residential internet providers (all dial-up, course) were America Online, Prodigy and CompuServe. Now, we have so many choices and the only one of those three to really survive the internet expansion of the early 2000's is AOL, though really not as an ISP. Call me Steve Jobs, but back in the early 1990's, I was visionary enough to think that email was an annoying technological inconvenience that was more of a fad than anything else and would never supplant "real mail" as a means of getting business done. :tooth:
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Lonewolf-PeruLonewolf-Peru Member Posts: 632 Senior Member
    My first computer was a Commodore SX-64. Went from that to a Mac in early 90s. I think it had a 500 MB hard drive and 16 MB of RAM.

    Mine was a ATARI 800 XL, in 1985.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    I remember those and we still have our original AOL account!

    Same here! I still have the same AOL email account I had when I was 12, the only difference being that AOL doesn't even charge for their service anymore since its merely an interface into most folk's broadband accounts rather than being used for dial-up anymore. Crazy how times have changed.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • justin10mmjustin10mm Senior Member Posts: 688 Senior Member
    First computer was Windows '95. We used Netzero, 10 hours of free dial up internet per month. "imoit:
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    TRS 80 with 16K memory in the 70's. Then an Atari 800 with 64K memory and a serial floppy drive in early 80's. Then an IBM PC, then in early 90's a PS2, and then a new PC with Windows 95. With the Atari back in the early 80's it was bulletin boards on a 200 baud modem. High speed stuff!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,792 Senior Member
    My high school buddies and I all had Commodore 64's. I think somebody got the 128 later on. When my parent first bought that machine, we bought the external tape drive with it. Want to load in a video game to play? Just plug a little reel-to-reel Maxxell tape into the tape player, push PLAY, and in about 15-20 minutes, it will have downloaded a clone of Pac-Man into the RAM.

    When one of our gang got the first 5 1/4" floppy disk around '86-'87, he was regarded as a god of space-age technology.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • terminator012terminator012 Senior Member Posts: 3,930 Senior Member
    I remember those and we still have our original AOL account!

    Same here. All 4 of us still have our Aol email accounts. We had no local provider for any internet and we had to dial up a long distance number. Had to add a long distance account to our phone just to keep it from costing us so much in long distance on the internet.
  • RimfireRimfire Senior Member Posts: 849 Senior Member
    My first, in 1980s, was a Texas Instruments TI-99/4A plugged into the TV and a cassette recorder. That's where I learned to program. When I began hitting issues with its capabilities Dad bought a Tandy 1000, like fishheadgib's, I bought the 1200baud external modem and hit the bulletin boards.

    In college, I ran 3 bulletin boards for the EPA and programmed on VAX/VMS systems. Met my girlfriend/future wife on BitNet Relay in 1990 and the rest is history.
    G&A Forum Member since: October 2000; Life Member: GOA, IWLA, NRA, & Escapees.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    I worked with computers from the late 60s, using large IBM mainframes for my scientific and engineering programming in first Basic, then Fortran. I managed a structural engineering firm's computer systems and learned the internals, machine language and such. Then when working in Cupertino, first learned Unix.

    It wasn't till the late 80s that I bought a PC and ran Windows at home. This was a step down for me, as I was used to high-end engineering Unix systems.

    Since then I've upgraded PCs and now use a laptop exclusively, a pretty nice HP Pavilion, now a few years old but it runs fine, since I don't do gaming or graphics and therefore don't require lots of power.

    As far as the net is concerned, I did the usual stuff, dialup to start, then moved to various services, Compuserve mostly. Now I've got a neat little Sprint 4G module that's plenty fast for my net needs.

    A computer for me is simply a tool, a writer's electronic typewriter. The most powerful stuff I do is print an occasional chapter or short story on my HP LaserJet. It's all MS-Word and that's no burden on a modest-size laptop. The struggle is in my own brain, writing.
  • RimfireRimfire Senior Member Posts: 849 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Now? I'm sitting on the crapper with an IPad. :tooth:


    Did you really have to go there. I now that image engraved in my brain, which I didn't need.

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    G&A Forum Member since: October 2000; Life Member: GOA, IWLA, NRA, & Escapees.
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,626 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    The thing is, I can even take a picture of me on the crapper using my iPad. And post it.


    I dare ya'! :tooth:
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Rimfire wrote: »
    Did you really have to go there. I now that image engraved in my brain, which I didn't need.

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

    It's better than the visual of him typing "LOL" to your post on a touchscreen with just a smidge of poo clinging to the tip of his "letter getter." Oh, wait...
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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