Wood stock

CurlsCurls MemberPosts: 44 Member
Just a quick question for the people who shoot long range some, I have a remington 700 BDL in 30-06 i was wondering if i changed out my wood stock to a synthetic stock with aluminum full length bedding would that help my accuracy ? And i was also wondering does a free float barrel make that much difference in accuracy compared to a barrel with some pressure points ?

Thanks, Curls

Replies

  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,607 Senior Member
    All depends on what pressures your old stock was putting on the barrel and how well it was stabilizing the receiver. The answer to your question is ...Maybe yes - Maybe no.

    I have found that a good trigger and good glass will make more difference than anything else.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,832 Senior Member
    Yes, a synthetic stock may help you. But for a 30-06 BDL, I wouldn't change the stock. But then again I love the old BDLs, even though they're shiny. Just bed the thing and don't look back. Bed the Recoil lug and about the chamber length of the barrel in Acra-Gilas or Devcon. Then, if it shoots good don't do anything else.

    However, if it still has accuracy issues or doesn't group as tight as you would prefer or you think it should, you might try taking the pressure point near the end of the forend of the stock out and see how it shoots free floated. I've taken the pressure point out on a couple of rifles and didn't know the difference. I've taken the pressure point out and accuracy improved, and I've taken the pressure point out of one rifle that opened the groups up from less than MOA to about 2 MOA.

    When you take the pressure point out, mark the stock where it was. Then, if it is detrimental to accuracy put it back in with epoxy. There's a good procedure for this that involves putting a small amount of epoxy on the spot where the point was, putting the rifle back in the stock without tightening the action bolts. Just start the bolts and run 'em in about half way where you're not putting pressure on the epoxy yet, then clamping the stock in a rifle vise upside down with the vise contacting the stock only, hanging a weight of 4 pounds on the barrel, torqueing the action bolts down and letting the epoxy cure like this. It will give it 4 pounds of upward pressure which should be about right.

    Hopefully, you won't need to put the pressure point back in, however many thin barrel sporters need the pressure point. And unless you have a spare stock exactly like the one on the rifle, this is the only way that I know of to see if it needs a pressure point or not.

    Good luck.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,025 Senior Member
    My rule: loosen the action screws a turn or two, If the action moves forward and back, or rattles like a maraca, glass the recoil lug area and first couple inch's of barrel. You want a tight fit. The trigger is easy to adjust and you can experiment with the free floating.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,507 Senior Member
    More than likely, yes. How much? Hard to say.

    Good handload, good optics, good trigger, all play a part, especially at distance.

    We need a baseline. More info.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,135 Senior Member
    Floating the barrel will likely help accuracy, certainly it won't hurt. But considering the caliber and the gun, probably won't help a whole lot. How much accuracy do you need for a 30-06?
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    Free-floating eliminates the chances of weather or barrel heat affecting the pressure on the barrel, changing your point of aim or accuracy due to the warping of the stock - more an issue with wood than with synthetics. The harmonics of some sporter-weight barrels are such that pressure-bedding "settles" the barrel's vibrations and tightens the groups. Snake's advice on reversing the free-floating if you don't see a benefit is well-taken.

    The synthetic stock, free-floating channel, and aluminum bedding block stocks were first used on heavy-barrel varmint and precision rifles, to best effect - lighter sporter barrels will likely achieve varying results from the procedure. Rugers, especially, seem to have a reputation for shooting better with that upward pressure on the barrel from the bedding points on the stock channel.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,135 Senior Member
    I recently demilled the bedding from the forend of my Ruger 77 in 22-250 and floated the barrel. It improved the accuracy greatly. I checked zero at 15 yards, and the barrel apparently had been strained upward, as the new zero was some seven inches low.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,507 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    I recently demilled the bedding from the forend of my Ruger 77 in 22-250 and floated the barrel. It improved the accuracy greatly. I checked zero at 15 yards, and the barrel apparently had been strained upward, as the new zero was some seven inches low.
    Glad to hear that, Gene.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,103 Senior Member
    Wood stock...
    jazz-of-thufeil-jimi-hendrix-woodstock-1969.jpg
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,935 Senior Member
    Freedom
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • horselipshorselips Senior Member Posts: 3,626 Senior Member
    I will never forgive myself for trading off my 700BDL in 7mm Rem Mag, but since I stopped reloading, I might as well get over it. The whole point of the BDL grade is that gorgeous, high gloss walnut stock, black forend, pistol grip cap, and white line spacers. Very elegant. If all you want is a good shooter, then buy an ADL. Anyway, my BDL had a free floating barrel. I could slide a dollar bill around it from chamber to muzzle. It was an earlier model, from the early 70's before the lawyers screwed up the triggers and you could adjust your own with a simple screw driver down to a fraction of a hair. Which I did. And it returned 1/2 MOA groups with most ammo and 1/4 MOA at 100 yards with handloads and Hornady 162 gr. BTHP Match bullets. I don't even know if Hornady still makes that particular bullet. Oh well.

    No need to swap stocks or glass bed - try free floating the barrel, if it isn't already. All the accuracy you'll ever need, and more than most other medium weight barrels. Enjoy your beautiful rifle.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,135 Senior Member
    You shouldn't try to get the barrel floating up to the chamber, just about an inch or two in front of the lug. But I assume we all know that.

    I had a .223 in 788 that wouldn't shoot but about an inch and a half. My first bedding job, I bedded it all the way down the barrel channel. It shot 1/2 and under after that. So sometimes barrel floating isn't the only answer. I'd never do that again, however. Just blind luck that one time.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Curls wrote: »
    Just a quick question for the people who shoot long range some, I have a remington 700 BDL in 30-06 i was wondering if i changed out my wood stock to a synthetic stock with aluminum full length bedding would that help my accuracy ? And i was also wondering does a free float barrel make that much difference in accuracy compared to a barrel with some pressure points ?

    Thanks, Curls

    If you are looking at the Hogue overmolded stock you need to pass on that and look to other brands.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,569 Senior Member
    Define what you mean by "long range."

    Tell us about the accuracy requirements.

    Tell us about your load.

    Tell us about the barrel (contour, length, twist.)

    Tell us about the glass on the rifle.


    What I am trying to get at it here is that you need to make the components all equal to the objective. Having a great stock is useless if your bullets can't get to the target that you can't even see anyway.
  • gatorgator Senior Member Posts: 1,689 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    If you are looking at the Hogue overmolded stock you need to pass on that and look to other brands.

    Explain please
    USMC 80-84
    -96 lbs
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    gator wrote: »
    Explain please

    It attracts dirt; the fine particle stuff. And it clings to clothing, making manipulations against your shoulder in winter clothing a pain. AND it is slick when wet, like with sweaty hands.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
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