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  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    We got to the top of the saddle and the other guy signaled that they were RIGHT THERE. Like, a couple of feet, on the other side of the bushes. They hadn't seen, smelled or heard us. How we were able to do that, who knows. It was like 70, so we were sweating, wind blowing straight to them, on rocks so it wasn't silent. Whatever, it worked. So he stayed put and I went up to go around the bushes. I got around the bend slowly and then saw a deer staring straight at me not 10 ft away. I froze and he kept looking, didn't spook. He knew something was there but couldn't pin me down. It was the tall & narrow buck. I mean screw bow distance, I was within spear distance lol. I snuck back around and signaled the bow hunter to come over and maybe try to make a shot. We were hoping we'd see the 2 big bucks but we didn't yet. He looked, saw the other deer I didn't, and wanted that one. This was the Bullwinkle deer. But when he started to get into position and draw, the narrow buck stood up in front of him. We sat there for like 5 min and they didn't move. Then the Bullwinkle laid back down and THEN the narrow buck, so he never got a clear shot. We backed off and went up the saddle a bit more to let them calm down and have a snack, see if the wind would change in our favor. It didn't, and we couldn't see into the gulch any better from up high. So we went down again on our side of the bushes, but this time to the bottom to see if the big boys had stayed under them. Nothing. Bow guy put on socks over his boots to try and make a stalk, but something finally got them to start moving. They moved straight across into an opening and I got down on a knee to steady myself for a shot if the old buck moved with them. Never did. So we followed them some more, just hoping they'd eventually lead us to other deer. Bumped them, then followed them. This is the deer that is in one of the animal pics, with the head sticking out of a thick bush. We pushed them until the end of cover and left it at that, any more then they had to cross goat country or bolt really fast, spooking everything in that canyon. As we were working back we saw another deer going up and over where the deer had crossed. He was OK, bigger then the other two but NOT the 2 we were after. Thinking back now, I think this might have been the buck I eventually ended up taking. We watched and watched to see if any others were with him, but no such luck. So now we are overlooking the lake in the pics that is surrounded by boulders and we sat down to do some hardcore glassing for a few hours. We picked apart every bush we could, every shadow, ledge, knife ridge and drainage. Nothing. This is when I saw the mountain goats though! That was pretty neat. That area was the first place that mountain goats had been introduced to Colorado, and is the original hunting unit GMU G1. Bow guy had mentioned that, but you didn't see them anymore. It was about an hour later I saw them. I though I had seen another deer real far off but couldn't be sure and didn't want to burn the energy making my way into that drainage, would've taken a few hours and exposed us from a few sides to anything in the area.

    A thunderhead started moving in so we figured on what to do, and we decided to call it for now and head back. He was done hunting (local guy, just comes up on Saturdays) and I figured I'd go back and eat, and come back up in the afternoon alone. He gave me a ride all the way back and we finally introduced ourselves lol spent like 8 hours and we never once asked each others names, just hunted and stalked like crazy. It was a good time and interesting to be that close with a total stranger for that long helping each other hunt.

    Well I had lunch, did a little fishing and was waiting for the sun to start its journey down. Mulies for the most part only move at the very edges of daylight, bucks especially seem to just hate the sun. This time though I drove my truck up. I stopped about halfway at an old road that was recently closed off by the NFS. Tim *bow guy* had said that would be a great place to glass and start a hunt from on foot and save a bit of distance from where we had been. I mainly just sat and glassed. Saw some does, and then I noticed a buck feeding down to an SUV parked(but empty) at the end lot. Then 2 more bucks came out right after him. They just sat almost on top of this car eating, no care in the world. I saw another buck come down but not all the way out into the open, I could see he was just a 3x3 though. There was a dark 4x4 but small, and 2 twin spikes. I saw another set of antlers moving (so this would be a 5th) but then a guy who had passed me on the road drove RIGHT towards the deer, I don't know if he ever saw them. They moved just as he came around a corner and sat in the brush above him while he glassed out the opposite direction. Never knew if he saw them. This guy actually did that several times that week.Got into glass position too late, and drove right under these bucks without so much as looking their way. I know that because I put the spotting scope on him to see what he was doing.

    .
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    Sunday morning, I got up well before dawn and headed out to that same spot to glass first light. I saw a lone doe in the distance and then I saw a cow elk head poking up through the brush. That was pretty neat, and usually just the sight of elk get my blood going tag or not, but this one didn't. I kept glassing and saw a buck vanish into some brush before I could get the scope on him, I was using the binos for quick spotting. I looked back at the cow and 1 cow turned into a herd of about a dozen. They started feeding down and then the bull finally stepped out. I couldn't count the points in that light, but they were totally ivory tipped and LARGE. Very nice bull. They all of a sudden decided to run, pretty much straight at me, and vanished below me into a creek bed. I kept glassing around the valley, as it was now pretty much shooting light. I focused a lot on the area we had seen the bucks moving, but nothing was there. I got out and started hiking that direction to go over and drop into the next canyon where we had left the little bucks. Just as soon as I got to the bottom and started heading back up, I caught a doe looking at me, then her fawn walked in. They stared but again, couldn't really pick me out (spray on scent-away WORKS). She even walked towards me and started stomping the ground trying to get me to do move or make a noise so she could figure out what she was seeing. I stomped back, she stomped more, I stomped back again. Doe decided I wasn't a threat and kept feeding. I moved on past her towards my destination. After about an hour I got to where we had last seen all the bucks and found nothing. I worked around the rim of the canyon and glassed a lot but to no avail. Then I noticed I had forgot to refill my camel-back DOH! I had a gatorade with me, so I had some liquid. I moved towards the area I saw the goats and then dropped down into the timber to poke around and find if anything was bedded. When I started working back towards the car I got to a cliff I couldn't see or pass, and turned around. When I took a step in the direction I had came a buck 50 yards below bolted from his bed. Never saw him the first time. Didn't get a look either at the antlers but it was a buck, way too big to be a doe. I figured that might have been the big cheater point buck. We weren't sure if they had dropped down to this area, but good chance they did.

    Made my way back eventually, didn't hunt as long or as hard as I wanted, but I didn't have water, and I'm not stupid enough to go trekking out like that when I know I'm running low on liquids. Got back to the car after going through a marsh (bad idea, short cuts are never short in the mountains) and went back to camp for food and to relax. Fished some more. Went back out around 430 to my glass spot and saw the little 4x4 and his twin spike buddies in the same exact spot. Didn't see anything else, but I had figured this is where those guys were always at. Went down the mountain to hit walmart, gas and check out my messages. This is when I first posted on my other thread about patterning the little buck and such.

    Monday morning I got up a bit late, but headed all the way to the parking lot. Before I got there I stopped and glassed and saw the trio of bucks again, but below where I had seen them before. I slowly drove to the parking lot and watched them feed RIGHT up to me. This is when I got the real close up pics of the deer. They were literally in front of my car, I think you can see my wipers in a few pics. That is when I noticed the little buck had that black mole on his neck. I got a really good look at him, his antlers are very symmetrical and well shaped, but small and he is young. If that buck makes it another 3-4 years and has good food he is going to be one IMPRESSIVE deer, you can just tell he has some serious potential. Hopefully he wises up a bit and stays away from humans. They fed up a hill just 20 yards behind me and that is when I got out and geared up. They watched, and didn't move off until I closed my doors, they seemed more annoyed then scared. This day I worked up into the alpine bowl above the valley, and this is where a lot of the REALLY high pics came from. Saw nothing, but I did find a lot of tracks and sign and a game trail. Came back that evening and glassed and the green truck had again drove right to them, but then another truck came in and was looking towards the buck. I saw a guy get out, with a rifle, but no orange and start up their direction. I was pretty pissed, that is a BIG no-no here, and its where CO fines the biggest number of people, no orange or not enough orange. In rifle seasons even bow hunters are required to wear orange, they take it very seriously. Got a description, his plate numbers, all that stuff and wrote it down.

    Tuesday I had plans to go back to my uncles cabin while my cousin and his fiance were still there (they live in CO) to shower and do some laundry. It had been hot, I was sweaty and gross, and needed to chisel off the stink. Hung out, had some more brisket and a beer then left. Instead of going up to camp I kept going to town to hit that brewery and to find food since it had started to rain. From here on, it rained almost NON STOP for the next 2 days. I didn't hunt much Wed because the fog and rain didn't let you see more then 5ft in front of you. I literally stood on the shore of the lake and couldn't see water, it was that thick. Rain rain rain rain. I was pissed. Forecast called for rain the next day too. It let up Thursday a bit and I went back to work a few areas. The big high canyon lake actually was in a wind pocket where I could glass and see. I saw one doe and that was it. Forecast called for 70% rain again on Friday, and I was REALLY getting pissed. Never saw my little trio of buck buddies either.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    That evening it was raining pretty good. I was able to get some dinner going but I ate it in the car with the heat on to dry out my boots, warm up and catch up on the news/sports. Rained all through the night, where the last few nights it was on and off. In fact I slept in Wed/Thur because when I woke up it was pouring. Anyways, it was raining when I first got up on Friday, so I reset my alarm and went back to bed. Water was getting in the tent now but I was able to stay warm, just some of my gear got wet. Got up, had my coffee and a donut stick and finally headed up the hill because it had actually stopped raining. It was cloudy so it wasn't too bright, although I didn't have real high hopes of seeing anything since t-storms and rain tend to keep bucks bedded down and not moving. Besides way up high in every basin they had plenty of food, and trickles of fresh water. A buck could go up in a tiny hidden basin and never have to leave.

    I started glassing and saw a lone doe , turned grey now (oh and the day before the leaves had quickly started turning fall colors, the deer changed almost as instantly as well) I watched her for a bit and then lost here. I glassed for another good 30 minutes and saw nothing and was about to give up and go back to cook a big breakfast because I intended to use this dry spell to work over 3 more drainages and hunt until my feet fell off. With a forecast of rain through the weekend I wanted to take what could have been my last real chance, and I was seriously debating going home because of the weather basically ruining the hunt. This is when I spotted another deer higher up feeding towards the bowl I had been in a few days earlier. Just through my binos I could see horns on top! I didn't even take the time to get the spotting scope, by now I had figured any legal deer was a dead deer, just to save my season and not leave empty handed. So I started up the game trail I found which was out of sight of the deer, but headed right to him. I lost him a few times, but after a few minutes of hard glassing would find him again, he had not seen me. This is when I noticed another rifle hunter (first rifle deer hunter I had seen, and first person in 3 days I had seen, period, camp emptied out Monday and it was just me almost all week) He had spotted something and was glassing in the same direction I was headed. Crap. I think he saw my buck too. He worked his way across the valley straight in the direction I was headed. But I dropped down to the area I had last seen the buck to try and find him. In the pics it looks pretty open, but in reality the cover was actually rather thick and it was easy for hunter or deer to vanish without a trace. I looked up hill and saw my buck starting to head into the bowl, the other hunter had already gone up through the brush. I was starting to curse the bastard for making a stalk on MY deer I had been working to get all week and he just showed up that morning. Then CRACK! Rifle shot. At this point I figured he got their first and nailed my deer. At this time I had thought I was actually trying to put a stalk on moley the muley, as he was my back up buck and this wasn't too far from where I had normally saw him, even though he was never in the parking lot again. I started up the hill (this is less then a minute after I heard his shot) and bam, there he was, MY buck was still there and had actually moved back towards the direction I had come up. I glassed him and saw it wasn't moley, but was much bigger, a buck I hadn't seen yet. I quickly moved behind a tree with some brush and dropped my pack, didn't have enough time to get the range finder out, but I could tell he was within shooting distance. I used my pack frame as a rest while on my knees, cranked up to 9x, breathed slow, steadied and started to squeeze the trigger.....CRACK. Nothing, the buck looked at me CRACK, I saw the buck stumble and move to the left. I didn't see the hit (6lbs fully hunt ready rifle doesn't allow to see the hit through the scope, its a bit "jumpy") Normally I would have waited a bit like we all do, before going after him, but again in this area it would be nearly impossible to track. So I got up to where I shot him and saw no blood....but I DID see a branch right in front of where he was standing, that I couldn't see below. I said some choice words that the filter here would not allow. I started working in the direction he went listening for anything, smelling the air for hints of game, anything. I went about 20 yards and saw the buck walking with his head down, still picking at leaves.....and a bit of gut hanging out. Crap, the bullet deflected down and to the right a bit and nicked him. I put the rifle up and this is when he saw me (100 yards or so, maybe a bit less) and CLICK.....*more words you can't use here* I racked the bolt back and had a misfire. Tossed it and put another one up, took aim and CRACK THUD right into the high lungs, he took 4-5 steps and down he went. This last scene took all of about 10 seconds, you can ask Chiro, JB or 5280 about how fast I work a bolt lol

    So I know he has a mortal hit now and start walking up to where he ran into a bush. Just as I got there I heard the last blood filled gurrgle of a solid lung hit and saw him twitch once, and that was it. I cheered pretty loud, walked up and poked the eye just to make sure I wasn't going to get kicked. That was that, took ahold and examined my trophy, my first trophy ever (last 20 years had been meat hunting females). Set up my camera on my scope tripod and got the pics you see and went to work. Again, I did the gutless method and it worked out real well. A bit sloppy my first time, but still a LOT easier then gutting THEN moving the animal THEN skinning it THEN quartering it.

    This puts us right about.....830am Friday. It took me a while to get him boned out and loaded up. I tried to take the 2 rear quarters AND the caped head in one trip, I only made it about 150 yards before I said this won't work, its too dang heavy and I can barely move let alone safely jump over all these jagged rocks. It was like the dam at a reservoir, big huge rocks. So I put him next to a tree and used my vest to mark him and got my marking tape and made my way back to the animal and most of my gear. Gear and neck meat, plus the straps/loins went next. Then back for the front quarters. Got them all to my tree and then tried to figure out the best way to get back to my truck. This time I put the gear and good meat bag on the pack, which was the lightest load and tried to get back. I went a horrible way. Marked and marked, looked back and saw I couldn't see some markers, so had to go back and mark again, so on and so forth. This took me about 1.5 hours to get down to the road.

    Oh yea, forgot another important part. On Tuesday, an excavator was brought in and was destroying the old closed road! Yea, had a guy on a big heavy machine, making noise in my valley, tearing up the trails so nothing but feet could get by. And even then, he was cutting ditches 5ft wide and 4-5 ft deep. He made it extremely hard to move around, since that whole basin was flooded and basically moose-marsh. Anyways....

    Finally got back to my truck and unloaded. Had some food and a long drink, rested for a bit, listened to Rush Limbaugh for a while and emptied the pack and decided to go back from my game trail instead of the road. Took me 12 minutes to get there :angry: Got back to the tree, loaded the next haul, and it was about 30 minutes back, since it was uphill and I was carrying big loads. Next came a rear quarter and more gear. 3rd trip was the other rear quarter, 4th trip was finally the head and the fronts. A nice couple from TX had driven up to the car and I chatted with them about the area, and the deer, we talked the difference in whitetail vs mule deer, elevation, just good chat. This is when I took the final pics of the bags and head on the fence. Smiled while looking over the canyons and valley, said my thanks to the deer and the earth, and loaded up. Got back to camp, very slowly so I wouldn't mess up the velvet, and finally got there about 4-415pm. Cleaned up some of the meat while drinking a well deserved beer. Strangely enough, it still had not rained a drop, and it was a 70% chance of rain that day. Chatted with my new neighbors a bit and got to thinking...you know what? I got my deer, I'm tired, I smell, I'm hungry, I will have hours of work to still do before getting into the cold wet tent again....screw it. I'm going home. I broke down and packed up camp in a real hurry, actually impressive how fast. Said my goodbyes to the guys at the next camp who had spotted me a smoke and took one of my barely leaking but still half full propane cans and shoved everything into the 4runner. I knew it was going to be a long dark drive, but at that point, nothing sounded better then my own soft, warm, DRY bed.

    And that, is that
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    What about the tenderloins?

    Once the back quarters are off you just have to shove the guts a bit and reach under the spine and cut them out. They were actually the easiest part of the whole thing. You do one whole side, neck, fronts, back straps, rears then loins, flip it over, and repeat.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,112 Senior Member
    You suck..............really really suck!!!!!!!!!!!

    Excellent report and pics. I need to save some money and get over there one day. Don't even care if I cant hunt, just covering some of that country would be enough for me.
    I am not surprised at the interaction between you and the other hunter........a common goal like hunting does away with the necessity of an introduction.

    Congratulations on your success and the perseverance in less than ideal conditions. I look forward to seeing the mount.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    You suck..............really really suck!!!!!!!!!!!

    Excellent report and pics. I need to save some money and get over there one day. Don't even care if I cant hunt, just covering some of that country would be enough for me.
    I am not surprised at the interaction between you and the other hunter........a common goal like hunting does away with the necessity of an introduction.

    Congratulations on your success and the perseverance in less than ideal conditions. I look forward to seeing the mount.

    We'll trade hunts ;)
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,661 Senior Member
    That sounds like an excellent time, except for the rain, you are killing me also. Did you burn your elk hunting vacation time or are you still going to hunt them?
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    no I'll be going elk hunting as well, 3rd season this time, so early November
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Excellent post-op report!

    Funny how that happens isn't it.........hunting and hanging with a complete stranger you meet out of nowhere.....spend hours with them and you never even exchange names.........like that time with the Wisconsin family that hunts the same mine area at the same time we do during elk season........good times!

    P.S. The loins were pretty tasty last night!
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    Great account of a great hunt. :up:

    I commend you for your perseverance and patience. :yousuck:
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,502 Senior Member
    Great story!
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,051 Senior Member
    P.S. Your loins were pretty tasty last night!

    .
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,502 Senior Member
    :spittingcoffee::spittingcoffee::spittingcoffee::spittingcoffee::spittingcoffee::spittingcoffee:
    P.S. Your loins were pretty tasty last night!
    :rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Gents, he has laid down the gauntlet. That is going to be hard to top.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    .

    Oh my brother.......next time we meet.............I owe you a smack you Tool!............:tooth:

    Ernie if i was you............I'd disown the Munchkin Miscreant poste haste!
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,720 Senior Member
    Great adventure.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,579 Senior Member
    Great story, adventure, and hunt.
    Well done, my friend!
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