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Now I know what you guys have to go through to go hunting.

orchidmanorchidman Senior MemberPosts: 8,108 Senior Member
One of my staff just came back from a months holiday with her husband and kids. She did an Alaskan cruise............and while she was in Walmart she picked up a copy of the 2013-2014 Alaska Hunting Regulations and brought it home cos she thought I would be interested.

135 pages !..........

I must admit, everything is laid out in a simple format and it is quite clear on what is required for both residents and non residents. This is the first time I have had a close look at your 'tag' system and although I haven't read the whole publication, I think I understand how the system works.

I assume the system is the same or similar for most other States and I guess that if you grew up in the USA it would be 'familiar territory' for those of you that go hunting. And I understand the reasoning behind the fees......which go towards conservation through various programs etc.

A couple of ideas that I particularly like.

The ability to donate meat to Food Bank Alaska who then pay the processing costs and distribute the meat.

The special provisions for military personnel, both resident and non resident.

The restrictions on the use of airborne transport.

I have explained on here before now what we have to do to be able to hunt................and compared to what you guys have to go through and the rules you have to obey it is as simple as being a licensed firearms owner and after getting permits for public land ( no fees) go and shoot something .........or as many somethings as you want.........

Am going to go read the fishing regs that she brought back with her now................
Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....

Replies

  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    I'm a little confused O-dude. What is this firearms license you speak of? And there are no public land permits here. If it's public you just walk out there and hunt.
    We do have a few prime areas that would otherwise be over run so there's a draw system in place. But this is just to keep the game from getting all shot off the place.
    Some states are more complicated than others and the bunny huggers muck things up, in California for instance, and non resident license costs are almost a disincentive in some states.
    Hunting, fishing and other outdoor pursuits are big business here so the skids are mostly well greased.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,070 Senior Member
    Alec, game regs vary GREATLY by state.

    I've never looked at Alaska's, but from your post, they sound MUCH more restrictive than Alabama's
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,706 Senior Member
    NV is much simpler

    http://www.ncwildlife.org/

    click hunting button at top
    click reg digest center of page
    open to page to get past fishing regs.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    One of my staff just came back from a months holiday with her husband and kids. She did an Alaskan cruise............and while she was in Walmart she picked up a copy of the 2013-2014 Alaska Hunting Regulations and brought it home cos she thought I would be interested.

    135 pages !..........

    I must admit, everything is laid out in a simple format and it is quite clear on what is required for both residents and non residents. This is the first time I have had a close look at your 'tag' system and although I haven't read the whole publication, I think I understand how the system works.

    I assume the system is the same or similar for most other States and I guess that if you grew up in the USA it would be 'familiar territory' for those of you that go hunting. And I understand the reasoning behind the fees......which go towards conservation through various programs etc.

    A couple of ideas that I particularly like.

    The ability to donate meat to Food Bank Alaska who then pay the processing costs and distribute the meat.

    The special provisions for military personnel, both resident and non resident.

    The restrictions on the use of airborne transport.

    I have explained on here before now what we have to do to be able to hunt................and compared to what you guys have to go through and the rules you have to obey it is as simple as being a licensed firearms owner and after getting permits for public land ( no fees) go and shoot something .........or as many somethings as you want.........

    Am going to go read the fishing regs that she brought back with her now................

    Alec, Alaska is like a whole Nuther country than Texas. Hell, If I go hunting in Alabama or Tennesse it's going to be like i'm in a foreign country compared to Texas. Even crossing the border into Louisiana, I might as well step out on the moon. Each state government is its own entity. All we have to do is line up under the U.S. Constitution. if we comply with that, then we're legal. However, the Constitution can be interpreted from state to state rather liberally.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    I'm a little confused O-dude. What is this firearms license you speak of? And there are no public land permits here. If it's public you just walk out there and hunt.
    We do have a few prime areas that would otherwise be over run so there's a draw system in place. But this is just to keep the game from getting all shot off the place.
    Some states are more complicated than others and the bunny huggers muck things up, in California for instance, and non resident license costs are almost a disincentive in some states.
    Hunting, fishing and other outdoor pursuits are big business here so the skids are mostly well greased.

    To own firearms over here you apply for a Firearms licence. Once you have a Firearms licence, to buy a rifle or shotgun all you need to do is produce it at the place of purchase, pay your money and take it home. ( Pistols and military weapons have special conditions)

    Permits are only required for land owned by the Dept of Conservation........public land is free. No limits on type or how many animals you take and there is no season. ( Upland game/waterfowl have seasons and limits and a hunting licence is required.) There are some areas/game species like Wapiti where a ballot is held.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,128 Senior Member
    I have read over the Alaska hunting and fishing regulations on a few different occasions and find them a bit more complicated than here in Michigan. I also realize that the state is freaking gigantic and needs varying regulations to cover the multiple habitats and regions.

    One thing of note in Alaska-- they have provisions for sustenance hunting and fishing and also allow for proxies to fill those tags/limits.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,143 Senior Member
    Here are the Texas hunting regs:
    http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/regulations/outdoor-annual/hunting/

    Seasons, bag limits and RULES vary by county. Some people have ranches that cross a county line, and they have different bag limits , rules and seasons depending on what part of the ranch they are hunting on. Seriously.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    I have read over the Alaska hunting and fishing regulations on a few different occasions and find them a bit more complicated than here in Michigan. I also realize that the state is freaking gigantic and needs varying regulations to cover the multiple habitats and regions.

    One thing of note in Alaska-- they have provisions for sustenance hunting and fishing and also allow for proxies to fill those tags/limits.

    Used to be like that here in Texas too, back say in the 50s. But now the mere mention of "Camp Meat" brings about a serious lecture from the game warden.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member
    Here in Kansas you buy a hunting license, which entitles you to take certain species. For certain game; deer, turkeys, elk, etc you purchase a kill tag...Resident tags are very reasonable, non-residents not so much...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    New Zealand has about 20 counties and is the size of Texas or there about. Having universal game laws there is understandable.

    tumblr_mq48keTGTW1rasnq9o1_500.jpg

    One of the differences between New Zealand and the United States, is that the Federal Government is supposed to exist to provide the services that individual States cannot, such as a National Defense. Our Constitution is supposed to grant power to the States and limit the Federal Governments power.

    Hunting has always be regulated by State Agencies, and therefore the different rules by different areas. The Federal Government can declare a species protected and the States must comply.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I have a distant cousin who is a long-term Alaska resident. His father relocated the family from Tennessee to Anchorage in the late 1950's. The old man is long gone, but he sired several children who still live there. When we visited there in the late 1990's, my cousin had just finished his "fishing for the winter"- - - -netting a pickup truck load of salmon to be dried and smoked, during one of several spawning runs. He said the fish were running so thick that he finally just waded to the waist-deep middle of the small stream he was fishing, and started tossing the fish onto the bank without the aid of the big net he was carrying.

    Now, here was my allotted red salmon take, being an out-of-state resident - - - - -buy a short-term non-resident license, and take 5 fish, caught on hook and line, and any foul-hooked fish (not hooked in the lip) had to be thrown back! I was also allowed to take one king salmon per season! Alaska residents, not just "natives", have liberal subsistence hunting and fishing priveleges. Tourists, not so much!
    Jerry
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    One example of different laws for different states, in Texas most counties allow tags for 2 buck deer and 2 or 3 doe, 4 to 5 deer per year per hunter. Some counties are one buck. I think most counties allow on only one forked horn on both sides) buck. And in most counties that must be a minimum of 13 inches between the inside main beams. In some counties they say this measurement must be wider than the ears at the alert position. In fact in those counties requiring 13 inches between the beams they claim that you can judge this by looking at the width as opposed to the width of the ears in the alert position.

    An example of fish is the Red Fish, or Red Drum, Channel Bass, etc. In Texas you are allowed 3 reds per day with a minimum length of 20 inches and a maximum of 28. I'm not sure about Louisiana, but I think it's like 5 fish a day with a minimum of like 16 and max like 30 inches. So you see that from state to state you have to read every rule book of each state.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,128 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Alaska residents, not just "natives", have liberal subsistence hunting and fishing priveleges. Tourists, not so much!
    Jerry
    Those salmon are not small fish. After a couple of days, that five a day limit adds up fast. My last trip up there yielded the four of us a combined 200 pounds of fillets to take home. It kept three families in fish for well over a year. Granted, we didn't eat fish every or every other day, but it was well worth the effort.

    I am sure you witnessed some of the residents bring their freezers and pressure canners with them-- they will can the salmon; fillet and release, then vacuum pack and freeze their catch right there on the river banks. It is pretty neat. They get to use nets and stuff too.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I've got a VHS video of my father catching a 76-lb. King Salmon in the Kenai River- - - - -the only fish that was caught on a half-day 5-person charter with a professional guide. He was in his mid-70's at the time. The world's record is 94, so that fish was not your average catch!
    Jerry
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,070 Senior Member
    Alec, here's a link to a PDF of Alabama's hunting regs
    http://www.eregulations.com/alabama2013/pageFlip/

    edited to add: Yes it's 76 pages long, but MOST of it is articles. It's a combination outdoor magazine with the regs mixed in.

    Also, if you bother to read it, they have changed the new "Game Check" you'll see listed in it twice,
    First they left it mandatory, but increased the time to 72 hours, Then, they eliminated the the $500 fine and made participation voluntary, but they're pushing it HARD to ensure that folks "volunteer" the information
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,026 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Alec, game regs vary GREATLY by state.

    You can say that again.

    Louisiana: Buy license. Hunt.

    Colorado: Buy license. Buy Rubicks cube. See which one you figure out first.....if ever.

    Mike

    wait....even buying a license in Colorado isn't that easy.
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,621 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    You can say that again.

    Louisiana: Buy license. Hunt.

    Colorado: Buy license. Buy Rubicks cube. See which one you figure out first.....if ever.

    Mike

    wait....even buying a license in Colorado isn't that easy.

    Jerry and MHS had it down pretty good last year, maybe they will take you hunting:wink:, the folks a the CO DOW were quite helpful also.

    MN seems to feel the need to constantly tweak the rules, they redid the the areas and zones maps a couple years ago for some bizarre reason, had been the same ever since I have been hunting.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • mosseybuckmosseybuck Member Posts: 524 Senior Member
    Before moving to Colorado, I had hunted in Kansas, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Alabama, and Florida. They were basically, buy a license go hunting, for months in all but Pa. Colorado is complicated:uhm: to say the least. Jerrybobco helped me figure out the basics when I first started hunting here, thanks again Jerry. It is a little easier now but you still have to do quite a bit of prep in advance each year. Even so, it took me three years to draw a mulie tag in the unit I hunt most.
    USMC '59-'65, NRA Lifer, Tennessee Squire
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Tennessee hunting regulations are pretty simple.
    Tennessee fishing regulations require the services of a Philadelphia lawyer, a military grade GPS with hard copy maps, and the patience of a saint to put up with the TWRA(Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency) officers that randomly pop up and harass you to the point of losing it and verbally ripping them a new one.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Years ago, the game wardens were good guys, If you were hunting a new area you could call, or even go to their house to ask about good spots, etc. I actually applied for the job when I was 21. In those days they gave you a SS .357, a pick up, and a flat bottomed boat and told you to go to work.

    These days they go through the police academy and carry Glocks and ARs, to match their military style haircuts I guess.

    I completely understand they have to deal with meth labs and pot fields. We recently lost one, along with a county sheriff who had enlisted his help in a water rescue because he had a nicer boat.
    Still, way to many have attitude problems.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Here in Kansas you buy a hunting license, which entitles you to take certain species. For certain game; deer, turkeys, elk, etc you purchase a kill tag...Resident tags are very reasonable, non-residents not so much...

    :that: That's were our State's Parks and Wildlife (formally CDOW) make their money........it's on average about $40-60 for a draw tag.......but add a few hundred more for someone coming from out of state........some areas you can get an OTC tag, but the better areas and times are draw only, and you only have to enter the draw by a specific date and you get your tag mailed to you......it's fairly easy once you get used to the system for big game. Colorado has the biggest elk population in the nation, so I've never had a problem getting drawn for an elk tag.......Mule deer tags are another thing, and MHS had to build up preference points of a few years to get his buck this year.

    The regions vary along with the rules and wildlife. Going out in the back 40 for a couple of does is very different than a week of searching for an elk in mountain high country.

    The rules are there to prevent annihilation of a species........so I'd rather take them than the hoops you have to go through just to purchase a firearm.........however, we have to jump hurdles to get a suppressor and you can just buy one online..........it's all trade-offs I guess.
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    When you an abundent population of just 3 big game animals, you have easy peasy regs. Go buy a tag. When you have an abundance of species but sometimes limited numbers, it has to be tightly regulated.

    Antelope
    Mule deer
    Whitetail deer
    Desert bighorn
    Rocky mountain big horn
    Mountain goat
    Moose

    Not very big populations of these, or they reside on mostly private lands

    Black bear
    Mountain lion
    Elk

    Plenty of these, and they all have some sort of otc tag. Yes some are in areas managed for trophy quality or certain population numbers, so no otc. But there are plenty of places you can just show up, buy a tag, and hunt almost anywhere
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
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