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What should I get?

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  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    I think the Whelen will be a gun you will enjoy shooting. Well within your recoil limits and should be a He'll of an elk cartridge. Not to mention, useful to you back home as well. Not a specialty rifle per se.
  • justin10mmjustin10mm Senior Member Posts: 688 Senior Member
    The .338-06 was invented for people that want magnum performance but not magnum recoil.

    The .35 Whelen would be nice also.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    There's a lot of good advice here, but I'm beginning to get my mind back on the 35 Whelen. The 358 does sound sweet, but I like the idea of the Whelen, which I have planned on building for about 4 years now. Buy now I'm wondering which action to build it on, my Ruger 77 or my Zastava Charles Daly Mauser. The only thing is that if I use the Zastava, I'll have to buy me a stock for it and some rings for it. The action came with a one piece base.
    But I still want to get one magnum just to have. Who knows, Maybe I'll get over my recoil shyness if I get me a 300. I know that one day I'll probably make the big step up, even though I hate recoil. I've just been putting it off.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    If you get a 300 Magnum of some kind, get a 300 Win Mag and I think you will be happy. :driving:
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,533 Senior Member
    A good brake like Holland's radial would turn either of those into a puff-cake recoil wise.
    Elk are not bullet proof by any means of the 06 family i like the 280 the best in terms of bullet choices and good high BC bullets for hunting.
    I have seen a lot of flinching problems with the bigger boys.
    I would rather have a guy get a gun he enjoys shooting and practices with enough (since it is not beating him up) to have full confidence when the moment of truth arrives.
    Right bullet in the right place=dead elk every time.
    By all means get what you want.
    A friend with a 300 RUM was pd shooting this past week from the prone position out to 800+ yards without pain. How? Holland Radial brake.
    This is a lightweight rifle BTW.
    Ernie
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...I tend to start w/ a rifle, then decide on a suitable caliber. Consider the trade-offs, & decide what you want, need, absolutely require. Do you want a lighter, shorter rifle, are you willing to pack around a longer, heavier rifle to take advantage of the increased case capacity of a magnum, CFR, 60* bolt, 3-position safety, magazine, etc., etc.??? Bye the way, the short mags tend towards the best of both worlds. The .338/06 is a very good choice, doesn't give up a whole lot to the .338 WM, but it's definitely ballistically superior to the .358 Win./ .35 Whelen...
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    wolf049 wrote: »
    there's nothing wrong with taking your .280 Rem or .280AI and use that money that you were going to spend on a new rifle for a gym membership and get in shape. I mean no offense Mike, just saying.
    This^.
    No offense Mike, but all the rifles in the world won't do you any good if you aren't up to walking 5-10 miles a day at 10,000 feet.
    When I bowhunted elk, I lost 11 pounds in the 9 days we were up there, and we ate MRE's at least once a day.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    justin10mm wrote: »
    The .338-06 was invented for people that want magnum performance but not magnum recoil.

    The .35 Whelen would be nice also.

    Justin, I am definitely into variety. I'm going with the whelen on this one, but I still have another action that a 338-06 would make proud. I was wondering what to do with the two. You just made up my mind for me. The 338-06 is on the list. Thanks.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    This^.
    No offense Mike, but all the rifles in the world won't do you any good if you aren't up to walking 5-10 miles a day at 10,000 feet.
    When I bowhunted elk, I lost 11 pounds in the 9 days we were up there, and we ate MRE's at least once a day.

    Joe amd wolf I already have a gym membership and I walk about 3 miles four times a week just as mainenance. I have done a couple of two week treks up around 10-12 thousand feet and I know what you're talking about. Before I had my surgery I was not capaple of walking a mile at sea level. But having lost 160 pounds and walking regularly, I will give it a try. Before I go though I will increase my program to more like 5 miles a day. Of course this is sea level and it's almost like comparing apples to oranges. But having never had the privilege of elk hunting, if I have to, I'm almost willing to die trying.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • ericbericb Banned Posts: 392 Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Joe amd wolf I already have a gym membership and I walk about 3 miles four times a week just as mainenance. I have done a couple of two week treks up around 10-12 thousand feet and I know what you're talking about. Before I had my surgery I was not capaple of walking a mile at sea level. But having lost 160 pounds and walking regularly, I will give it a try. Before I go though I will increase my program to more like 5 miles a day. Of course this is sea level and it's almost like comparing apples to oranges. But having never had the privilege of elk hunting, if I have to, I'm almost willing to die trying.

    That is not an uncommon occurrence. I would get up to 5 miles a day now, get a stress test done by a cardiologist and see what it takes to get your heart to 85% of the max for your age. Next spring, find a high school or college football stadium and hit the stairs. Depending on the height, walk up and run down as many laps as possible. Over the next 6 months increase the number of laps and start adding a pack. Every month add 5 -10 pounds to the pack. Not to be a prick but a maintenance program is not good enough. Losing weight is not good enough. You will have muscles screaming from lack of O2 that you didn't know you still had. I want to see you succeed not be packed off that mountain,
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Joe amd wolf I already have a gym membership and I walk about 3 miles four times a week just as mainenance. I have done a couple of two week treks up around 10-12 thousand feet and I know what you're talking about. Before I had my surgery I was not capaple of walking a mile at sea level. But having lost 160 pounds and walking regularly, I will give it a try. Before I go though I will increase my program to more like 5 miles a day. Of course this is sea level and it's almost like comparing apples to oranges. But having never had the privilege of elk hunting, if I have to, I'm almost willing to die trying.
    :beer: Good deal Mike, I'm glad you're looking towards the physical aspect of the hunt as well. I just think it would be the worst feeling in the world to be on an elk hunt, and be too pooped to leave camp, or hike to where the critters are.
    As for rifles, take your pick. Anything that you shoot well will do. I mean, I wouldn't bring a 270, but a 25-06 would do.:tooth:
    If you're recoil shy, I'd think a 280 would be about the best balance between ballistics, power, and recoil. 7mm's have brought down a bunch of elk over the years.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Yeah I agree Eric, but I just had a stress test not long back and passed with flying colors. As for the stairs and running, that's a different problem. I could walk them up and down, but there's no chance I'm going to run up or down. I had Diabetic Neuropathy 6 years ago and my left leg won't let me run. and running stairs is totally out of it. I can walk fine but no acrobatic stuff. I can walk ten miles if need be. I did it not long back when I locked my keys in my car. I have no issues with out of breathness or anything. It's just that I can't do anything real fast. But walking even on uneven mountain ground is no issue. When I was at the SE shoot last year, it had only been a couple months since my surgery and was just getting back in shape, but since then I have walked a million miles I think.But the idea of walking with a pack is very smart. I will start working with that. As for diabetic issues, Since I had the gastric by pass My blood glucose runs about 90-95 in the mornings. Before it was always 150-170. My body screams for exercise. I feel like a million dollars when i walk for an hour or so. I will take your advice and get a more serious program going. I do remember going up over 11,000 feet and if you're not in good shape and acclimated, you are in trouble.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • ericbericb Banned Posts: 392 Member
    That thumbnail pic I posted is a canyon south of here that we fished over Memorial Day. It was cold and rainy and we hiked to the bottom and then back out. Vertical elevation change was about 1600' over 1/2 mile. Honestly, the walk down had my legs and knees screaming just from the angular stress on the joints. The hike back up, my butt ()() were on fire. Imagine doing that into 2-3 drainages in one day, carrying a 10# rifle and 25# of gear. And if you are lucky, packing out 350#-500# of meat, cape and horns.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Joe you're right on about 7s and elk as to what I've heard. I know a 7 mag is a really good choice and a 280 is not chopped liver either. My 280 I have no doubt would suffice as would my .270, either one with a good well constructed 150 grain bullet. But if I have the Whelen done by then it will get first nod. I also have a very good 30-06 that I would maybe load me up some good 165 grain Partitions or maybe some Speer Grand Slams or something on that order. What ever I think I'll have the right medicine.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    I like the 7mm Mag, the 7mmSTW and of course the 300Win Mag on elk, they all give me the power and distance I need. Of course there are many more cartridges that will do the job.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Eric, That looks very rugged in the thumbnail. When I went on treks in New Mexico, there were times I just wanted to curl up around a tree and die. The air would seem to be completely void of oxygen. Back then I weighed in at between 340 and 350. At the time I was around 6 feet, so though I am not short, 350 is a bit much even with my substantial frame. But I was always athletic and two years before I had run some 10 Ks though not at that weight. I would run at 275-290. Though 20 years older now, I am now at around 210-215 and still athletic. I have gotten in much better shape since my surgery on March 18, 2010. Even at 63 years old (I'll be 64 by the time of this hunt) I feel good enough that I think with a little more tuning up that I can do this. I have an uncle with a similar build who was hunting in Canada when he was 70. We are very substantial physically, and I have always been able to gut it up in a pinch and get through a bad situation. My first time on a trek in New Mexico, we started out at 7,500 feet and went up to 10,000 on the first day. I thought I was going to die right then and there at a place called Saw Mill Camp. I couldn't even help pitch camp. My oldest son thought I was going to die. Here I was used to living at 20 feet above sea level and I was well over 300 pounds at 10,000 feet having completed a 10 mile walk going from 7,500 feet to 10,000 feet in a day. I was feeling like it was the end of the world. The next morning I told the other adult leaders I was throwing in the towel and I'd wait until the supply truck came later in the week and get a ride back down the mountain. So they left me there and took off for Baldy,which was at 12,400. In the mean time a benevolent soul gave me some food and I remember watching our troop hike up the side of that mountain and into the tree line and out of sight. I felt like I was alone on the moon. I hung around the camp all day and then around 2 pm I noticed I was feeling a lot better. Our sister trek was there and I found that they were bypassing Baldy because they had younger boys and their adults were all pretty old. So I ask if i could tag along with them to the next camp. Well they told me to get ready that they were moving out at 4 PM. So I got my act together, took a shower, and ate somemore food and drank plenty of water. We started out at 4 and I noticed a new spring in my step. I got stronger as we went and I regained hope that all was not lost. Talking with one of leaders in the sister trek he told me that he had done about the same thing his first trek. But he said once you go through hell and get acclimated every thing comes around. I went on with that bunch, a group from Austin TX. and we made camp that night. The next moring we got up and started out for the camp where we were to meet up with our group. That afternoon at about three pm we were hiking along a stream and there was my boy and some of the others sitting by the stream. I had made the third camp and had survived. There was a lot to what the other leader had told me. Once you get your wind back (become acclimated to the altitude) it get's much better.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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