How do you typically spot game?

BigslugBigslug Senior MemberPosts: 6,945 Senior Member
OK. . .my first poll posting since the forum reboot. This is odd, and hope it works.

Basically, what is your primary method for your initial spotting of game and then confirming what you're looking at before pulling the trigger?

Talk a little bit about your area as well.

How do you typically spot game? 20 votes

Eyeballs Only (what are these "optics"?
10% 2 votes
Eyeballs first, then confirm w/binos
45% 9 votes
Eyeballs first, then confirm w/ riflescope
25% 5 votes
Binos first
10% 2 votes
Spotting scope first, lesser optics follow
10% 2 votes
WWJMBD?

"Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee

Replies

  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,668 Senior Member
    Not a poll :nono:

    I sit in the shooting house and when a deer walks out onto the food plot, I shoot it
    here's the view from one of my shooting houses (aka A box blind)
    IMG_0003_zps7160c843.jpg
    and here's the other
    2_zps2d39b34e.jpg

    edited to add: notice there are deer in both pics :tooth:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,726 Senior Member
    I see it, then I put the scope on it, then I decide to shoot or not. In my neck of the woods this all occurs in less than 10 seconds. I have had a few stand there and look at me, but I held my position with the scope on them until a shot presented that I wanted to take.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,945 Senior Member
    For me, it seems to be primarily a matter of spot something with the naked eye, and then confirm with 10x42 binoculars, although if what I'm looking at is a buck, I may go straight to the 4.5-14x riflescope to confirm that he's a SHOOTABLE buck.

    Thus far, I think I have had exactly ONE instance where I made the initial deer spot while glassing with binos. Should probably spend more time on them, but the brain feels it's seeing more at 1x than 10x - even if that's probably not the case. My primary area is a burned pine/scrub oak forest that burned maybe 7 years ago. Most visibility is inside of 300 yards.

    Spotting scopes - use them for targets only at this point. Too much to lug.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Eyeballs, binos, spotting scope. Near to far in overlapping arcs from right to left.

    That's what dem bookz taught usn's ta do.

    Edit: gots my right in left mixed.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    You scan right to left because your brain is conditioned to read left to right. It knows how to read a sentence without looking at all the words. So, it's conditioned to view a part to make a whole.

    Therefore, you scan right to left to force your brain into something it's not conditioned to do. The result is attention to detail.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,668 Senior Member
    I see it's a poll now.

    Considering the views and max distances from my shooting houses (92 yards in first pic, 144 yards in second) When I put the scopes on them, it's because I'm about to drop 'em. The MkII eyeballs tell me all I need to know. " There is a deer" and "It doesn't have spots"

    Once I know those 2 things, it's a legal target and is probably destined for my freezer
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,583 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Eyeballs then rifle scope.
    Yeah yeah yeah, all the hunting rules say don't do that.

    That's what I do, no shots longer than 350 yards where I hunt, I know if it is game before I put crosshairs on it.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,978 Senior Member
    Really depends on the terrain. I needed more than one option to vote for.
    Eyes, binocs, then spotting scope if needed.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,978 Senior Member
    Very few people teach this...
    Zee wrote: »
    You scan right to left because your brain is conditioned to read left to right. It knows how to read a sentence without looking at all the words. So, it's conditioned to view a part to make a whole.

    Therefore, you scan right to left to force your brain into something it's not conditioned to do. The result is attention to detail.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,836 Senior Member
    I use my eyes first, scanning for horizontal lines, movement, etc. If I see something of interest, I'll check it out with binoculars.
    Here on the prairie, you seldom need to be in a hurry to get a shot off, if you are positioned well, you can often watch a critter for a long time before it gets into range. When you get down into the timber, things change some.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,053 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    I see it, then I put the scope on it, then I decide to shoot or not. In my neck of the woods this all occurs in less than 10 seconds. I have had a few stand there and look at me, but I held my position with the scope on them until a shot presented that I wanted to take.
    Yep. Same here. They are already confirmed by eyeball, but there really isn't another chance to find them in binoculars. I had plenty in my scope last year, just not enough where I could get a good shot.

    If I get bored I will play with the binoculars.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,552 Senior Member
    I hunt from a box blind, these days, and my 'field of fire' is a 180 degree arc, with no shots available for much over 200 yards. I scan with my eyeballs, mostly upwind and if something gets my attention I watch it with my binoculars until I determine it to be a 'shooter.' Then I pick up my rifle and keep it in the crosshairs, resting the forearm on the 'window' and positioning a bipod under the stock (if time allows). I wait as long as I think I can get away with, for a perfect broadside, because I like to hit the heart and both lungs without messing up the shoulders. This has worked well for me for 3 of the last 4 years. A few 'shooters' have managed to walk away before I get the shot I want, but I don't grieve over it, because that's just hunting...at least it is my version of it. If I had access to some place where spot and stalk were possible, I would do it differently - more like the way I squirrel hunt, but you have to adapt to whatever is available to you.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,702 Senior Member
    I haven't voted on any of the choices cos it depends on the terrain That I am hunting.
    If there are open areas I will eyeball them first then scan them closely with the bino's. If there is something there, I will then 'range' it ( Combo bino/rangefinder) and then look at the terrain between the animal and my position with a view to planning the stalk.
    When stalking in the thicker stuff, I use eyeballs firstly and then bino's or scope to confirm if I spot something.
    The way I stalk is that I will stop and look very closely in a 360degree arc , sweeping from right to left. I will then take a step and do the same thing again. A lot of hunters dont realise the amount their field of view changes by just taking one step. Trees and objects that are obscuring an area will 'open' up with a small 'position change'. While I am scanning an area I will also be planning the next step or two so that I can pick a route which will hopefully cut down on noise etc.

    If I see any movement at all then I will freeze on the spot and wait till whatever caught my attention is identified.........some of the thick areas I have hunted in the past few years have been so thick that I have picked up animals by an ear 'flicker' or less. The last animal I shot was at the bottom of a slope in a very dark shaded area and all I saw was the flicker of the tip of its ear. When I raised the rifle everything became clearer and I put a 120gr Sierra into its head at 20yds.

    (Here is the report.............. http://forums.gunsandammo.com/showthread.php?16009-Todays-hunt-report-caution-gory-pics-(120g-Sierra-results-Paul-) )
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,243 Senior Member
    Binoculars? Not needed. By the time you are able to spot a deer around here, they are close enough you could hit them WITH the binoculars.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,898 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Binoculars? Not needed. By the time you are able to spot a deer around here, they are close enough you could hit them WITH the binoculars.
    :that:

    Besides if it is brown and not a dog it is going down.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,726 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    Yep. Same here. They are already confirmed by eyeball, but there really isn't another chance to find them in binoculars. I had plenty in my scope last year, just not enough where I could get a good shot.

    If I get bored I will play with the binoculars.

    I kind of wonder why I bring them along sometimes, it is fun to watch grouse, squirrels, beaver, otters, fox and such though.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    I vored spotting scope first, but it is usually that or binos then spotting scope. Depends on how i am hunting. Usually before first light i am on my way to a high vantage point, while i walk i use the binos every few yards. Sometimes that is all i need but sometimes i need a closer look. My spotting scope is actually very light, weighs less then a lot of 10x binos, 22oz. But, i also hunt in different terrain then most here, some sort of good glass is essentialout west the majority of times. 3 of my favorite spots are cross canyon
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    i voted eyes then binos but when bow hunting from a stand it's usually binos first, catching movement back in the cover. Using a gun I use a mixture of still hunting and stopping in a likely area for long periods of time. So then it's lots of bino use. But I'd have to say most times I've seen them with my eyes first then gotten my rifle up and when the animal presented a shot, or I thought it was about to, it was straight to the scope.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,666 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Binoculars? Not needed. By the time you are able to spot a deer around here, they are close enough you could hit them WITH the binoculars.

    Same here, for the most part. My longest possible shot is 130 yards from my blind. I will SOMETIMES use the optics on the rangefinder to confirm the points on a deer at that range before using the gun's optics to shoot the ****.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
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