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Goat fence on PVC

agewonagewon Senior MemberPosts: 655 Senior Member
Calling all farmers;
My cousin has 3 hogs and a goat (all pets) that she's moving to her property. They've lived together for a few years and have had no issues.
The problem is that her new pen is divided by PVC fence. The 3 style kind. I got her some goat fencing but now were trying to figure out how to attach it to the PVC. my first thought was to use the aluminum wire they use for chain link, but is there something better?

Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Try these- - - -

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/100pc-6-White-Ball-Bungee-Cord-Tarp-Bungee-Tie-Down-Canopy-Straps-/261219509783?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd1e56617

    Easy to attach, and no problems removing them when necessary. I suppose it's possible the goats might nibble on the cords, so I'd also string a hot wire a few inches inside the main fence. Nothing says "stay put" like a few thousand volts applied to a goat's nose! Works like a charm with our miniature mule!
    Jerry
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,617 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Heavy Duty Zip ties.

    FIFY...

    But I wouldn't feel good about using that kind of set-up for hogs or goats...Just bite the bullet and get some t-posts and build a proper fence.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Chicken wire & baling wire, a farmers two oldest and best friends.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,617 Senior Member
    Chicken wire barely works for chickens....one of the jobs of a fence is to keep critters out as well as keeping critters in...I've seen coyotes chew through chicken wire...Now chicken wire layered over sheep fence is a darn good combination
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Like Teach said, add a live wire & high voltage, nothing alive will want to chew on it, a neon light will tell you it is live, just enough voltage to discourage not harm anything.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,812 Senior Member
    T-posts and cattle panels, if hogs are involved. Unless you ring their noses to keep them from rooting, they will simply leave when they become disenchanted with their new home, or miss one meal. Cattle panels don't flex, if properly supported, so it takes a deep hole for them to go under. Or, put a hot wire like Teach says, top and bottom, and they won't get within a foot of it after one or two attempts.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Won't direct sunlight break down PVC? I can't get more than 3 years out of the PVC pipes in my drip irrigation system!
  • agewonagewon Senior Member Posts: 655 Senior Member
    My hanks guys.
    The problems is that to use zip ties, they'd have to be really long to get around the posts (6" posts) and would be cost prohibited. And a hot wire isn't needed, these pigs are pretty well mannered. Their old pen was just chicken wire against a wooden fence and it's as new as the day it was installed. They're happy where they are.
    Bailing wire may be the way to go. Going to need a lot since the posts are 8' on center, and have to put up about 320' of fence.
    I've also thought about just getting the T posts and mounting them an inch or so inside of each post. I'm going to the supply house today to see which will be easier.
    Another side note; my cousin lives in a farmhouse and the land has been leased to this guy. He has 9 stalls and my cousin keeps 3 expensive horses down there. Well not too long ago, he took on a partner and she's pushing my cousin out and making things very uncomfortable. So the land owner gave my cousin part of the front field that was never in the barn lease but they used as pasture anyway. She's worried that when this fence goes up, the guy will set her horses loose to get back at her. Now, my cousin lives for these animals, and each one is worth around 10 grand. I have yet to see him down there and talk to him, but he's one of those narcissistic guys that flies off the handle and does dumb things when upset. I'm hoping the guy never shows (we are moving her horses Sunday to a new barn) until were done, or things may get ugly should he try and push her around.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Get a roll of heavy gauge aluminum electric fence wire. It's easy to work with, easy to cut, and will hold the wire to the posts and rails.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Hogs do not get disenchanted, they get disgruntled, grunt replacement therapy is expensive !
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
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