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What 7mm (.284) bullets do you like for hunting?

BPsniperBPsniper BannedPosts: 1,961 Senior Member
In whatever 7mm chambering you have.

Back when I had a 7mm Rem Mag, I used 140gr Nosler Ballistic Tips. Took several whitetail and muley with this bullet including my best muley to date.

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He was a beast! So much so, the processor accused me of killing a cow elk and trying to pass the quarters and ribs off as a deer when I took them to him. I had to get the head and bring it to him to prove I wasn't lying.

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Anyway, the bullets always worked well.

With my soon to be .280 Remington arriving, I am gearing up to load for it and was curious as to what 7mm bullets you guys used and what your opinion of them was.

I am looking into getting the Hornady 162gr A-Max and giving them a go. What info or suggestions you guys got as to bullets for this caliber?

Replies

  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    I've had excellent luck with both the Nosler AccuBond (Africa) and the Barnes TTSX (whitetail), both in the 140 gr. flavor for my 7mm-08.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...never could quite figure that one on a 7mag. Ballistic tables pretty much say that using similar bullets in 140, 160, & 175gr., you have to be able to push the 140's a lot faster than max to show any significant gain in trajectory, & out there where BC makes a difference, the 140's are shedding velocity a lot faster, don't have the energy of the heavier bullet, & are more prone to wind effects. Bullet drop is easy, doesn't matter if there's 4" more drop @ 400yds. wind is a lot more of a problem, but the real acid test is how the bullet performs over a wide range of impact velocities. I want good controlled expansion, w/ enough shank to push the bullet thru. I killed a lot of deer, elk & bear w/ 160 & 175gr. GrandSlams, & a few deer & an elk w/ the 160gr. Sierra HPBT GameKings, they do what I want 'em to, so that's what I use...
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    wildgene wrote: »
    ...never could quite figure that one on a 7mag. Ballistic tables pretty much say that using similar bullets in 140, 160, & 175gr., you have to be able to push the 140's a lot faster than max to show any significant gain in trajectory, & out there where BC makes a difference, the 140's are shedding velocity a lot faster, don't have the energy of the heavier bullet, & are more prone to wind effects. Bullet drop is easy, doesn't matter if there's 4" more drop @ 400yds. wind is a lot more of a problem, but the real acid test is how the bullet performs over a wide range of impact velocities. I want good controlled expansion, w/ enough shank to push the bullet thru. I killed a lot of deer, elk & bear w/ 160 & 175gr. GrandSlams, & a few deer & an elk w/ the 160gr. Sierra HPBT GameKings, they do what I want 'em to, so that's what I use...

    That was back in my earlier days of less ballistic knowledge and more hunting desire. I got the loaded ammo from Georgia Arms and used it. But I agree with you.

    That is why I'm looking to the heavier bullets for the .280 Remington. Take advantage of the BC and down range performance of the calibers capability. That said, the 140s worked for me back then and I think they are fine for the 7mm-08. Larger cases can make better use of the heavier pills and I plan to explore that possibility. Besides, my 6.5 is handling the 140gr arena.

    Just curious what everyone else is using.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,456 Senior Member
    162 A-max, 168 Berger, 168 JLK, 180 Berger, 180 JLK
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,070 Senior Member
    7T/CU = 120 Hornady SSP (Until I run out, they discontinued the "Single shot pistol" bullet a few years ago :tissue )
    7IHMSA = 120 Nosler Ballistic Tip
    7x57 = 140 Rem Core-lokt

    I don't have the potential for the long range shots, or large sized game that some of you do, so these bullets have done everything I've needed them to do, as long as I do my part
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,927 Senior Member
    In my 7mag, I have mostly used 175 grain Speer Grand Slams. That's the load I still use when I carry that rifle. I loaded up some 139 grain Hornady boat tails once, and shot an antelope with it. However, I quit using that load a long time ago.

    For my .284, I killed a nice pronghorn buck and a nice mulie buck using 140 grain Hornady Interbonds. I hit the pronghorn a bit far back, and he ran about 100 yards before lying down. The deer, though, dropped like a rock and was probably dead before he hit the ground. If I get a chance to use it this year, though, I've switched to 139 grain Sierra Game Kings. For my intended use, I think these bullets will be fine.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    140gr Sierra SBT, 140gr Nosler BT, 140gr Nosler Accubond and the 160gr Sierra HPBT
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    and the 160gr Sierra HPBT

    How did you like this bullet and it's performance on the range and on game? I looked at this one on Midway and the reviews were good. Much like the .25 and .30 cal HPBT Gameking. As with those two though, the BC is attrocious for the weight of the bullet. Everyone says they shoot like mad and work well on game. I assume you have had the same experience?
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    They preform just as the 30 caliber and 25 caliber HPBT when it comes to outstanding terminal ballistics. Don't jump all over the BC because these bullet fly extremely well and are very stable down range with the ability to still give you excellent terminal results on game.

    Using a calculator that calculates the different BC that this Sierra bullet gives you at different velocities, one will begin to see the potential of this bullet's down range ballistic. I move the 165gr HPBT out of my 300Win mag a 3170fps and sight it 2.0 inches high at 100yds with a 270yd zero -5" low at 340yds only being 11.7" low at 400yds.

    No bullet exactly follows G1 or G7 except the models which generated those drag curves. Most of our rifle bullets trace a drag curve somewhere between these two drag curves. Sierra takes a very sensible approach. They specify different G1 coefficients for different velocity regimes, thus creating a unique drag curve to match a particular bullet.

    Those that have really looked at commercial bullets from the standpoint of ballistic efficiency know that Sierra does things a bit differently than other bullet makers. They define multiple ballistic coefficients (G1) for each bullet, specifying the velocity ranges for which each applies. One bullet has six ballistic coefficients defined over it's full operating range!

    For example, let's look at the Sierra .308 180 gr. HPBT MatchKing (2220). Sierra literature displays this bullet's BCs as follows...

    .475 @ 2800 fps and above
    .496 between 2200 and 2800 fps
    .494 @ 2200 fps and below

    A few calculators calculate these different BC due to different velocities of the bullet in flight. In normal English, the above reads "Use .494 to 2200 fps, then .496 to 2800 fps, then .475 for all higher velocities".

    Of course, some Calculators actually observe these BC/velocity ranges as it calculates trajectories using Sierra bullets.
  • Hunter_1Hunter_1 New Member Posts: 7 New Member
    162 A-max, 168 Berger, 168 JLK, 180 Berger, 180 JLK

    I agree!
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    Hunter_1 wrote: »
    I agree!

    Hey! He posts!!! Glad to see you on here being social instead of just lurking. Haha.

    Yeah, the 162gr A-Max is going to be my first try. But I think I might try the 160gr Sierra Gameking HPBT at some point too.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    They preform just as the 30 caliber and 25 caliber HPBT when it comes to outstanding terminal ballistics. Don't jump all over the BC because these bullet fly extremely well and are very stable down range with the ability to still give you excellent terminal results on game.

    Using a calculator that calculates the different BC that this Sierra bullet gives you at different velocities, one will begin to see the potential of this bullet's down range ballistic. I move the 165gr HPBT out of my 300Win mag a 3170fps and sight it 2.0 inches high at 100yds with a 270yd zero -5" low at 340yds only being 11.7" low at 400yds.

    No bullet exactly follows G1 or G7 except the models which generated those drag curves. Most of our rifle bullets trace a drag curve somewhere between these two drag curves. Sierra takes a very sensible approach. They specify different G1 coefficients for different velocity regimes, thus creating a unique drag curve to match a particular bullet.

    Those that have really looked at commercial bullets from the standpoint of ballistic efficiency know that Sierra does things a bit differently than other bullet makers. They define multiple ballistic coefficients (G1) for each bullet, specifying the velocity ranges for which each applies. One bullet has six ballistic coefficients defined over it's full operating range!

    For example, let's look at the Sierra .308 180 gr. HPBT MatchKing (2220). Sierra literature displays this bullet's BCs as follows...

    .475 @ 2800 fps and above
    .496 between 2200 and 2800 fps
    .494 @ 2200 fps and below

    A few calculators calculate these different BC due to different velocities of the bullet in flight. In normal English, the above reads "Use .494 to 2200 fps, then .496 to 2800 fps, then .475 for all higher velocities".

    Of course, some Calculators actually observe these BC/velocity ranges as it calculates trajectories using Sierra bullets.

    That's something I've always loved about Sierra's bullets: the multiple BC data for each bullet. Dexadine's Ballistic Explorer software actually allows you to enter the three BC's from Sierra's load data for a more accurate trajectory prediction.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Oh man, that's a loaded question, loaded with possibilities that is. Actually, I like those 7mm bullets that say .277 on the box. Mainly the ones that say .277 130 grain Sierra Game Kings. However, those other 7mm bullets, the ones that say .284 on the box I have had good luck with 140 or 150 Grain Game Kings. I have used 140-150 Grain NBT too but prefer the Game Kings on deer anyway.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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