Update on my pistol shooting problems, good news!

samzheresamzhere BannedPosts: 10,923 Senior Member
(this could also be posted in the General section)

Some time ago, I was having considerable difficulty in my pistol shooting. I was a ways off in accuracy from my previous "pretty good" accuracy. This was mostly with my Springfield Operator 1911 (also my XD Tactical .45), 50-foot indoor range, standard practice factory ammo, distances ~25ft.

I tried grip tape on the front strap of my gorgeous 1911, seen in my avatar (ugly!), I tried difference stances, and not much worked.

But after some more dry-fire practice and a couple more visits to the range, I found that with my increasing arthritis, my previous "quick grip" technique simply wasn't firm enough.

Recently, I've lost over 40 pounds, have greatly increased my general health, and found that if I simply grip the pistols more firmly, my original accuracy is about 90% restored!

I had simply used my previous grip force due to general practiced habit, but that habit needed to be modified. And the only change needed was that I had to consciously increase the force of my grip beyond what once worked. After I made the change, my accuracy has zeroed in again, and I'm very pleased.

Sorry, no target pics to show but I'm okay now. Rapid fire, all my shots at 25ft fall in the 5-bull (with an occasional "flier" in the 4-ring). With a .45, that's all I need.

Thanks to everyone for the advice earlier!

Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx

Replies

  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,887 Senior Member
    Good
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    It was a case of brain fade, I think...

    "Hands calling brain, hands calling brain -- we need to squeeze a bit harder!"

    "This is your brain. We value your partnership with us and will reply to the hand squeeze request as soon as possible. In the meantime, we offer you some delightful music..."

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,525 Senior Member
    Good news Sam. Glad it was something simple

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Good news Sam. Glad it was something simple

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk

    Yeah. I just had to persuade my rock-solid brain to squeeze a bit harder on the grip to compensate for my increasingly stiff hands. I'm dry-fire practicing that at home now, so as to lock that into the ol' reflexes. Simple mind, simple solution. Duh.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,685 Senior Member
    Sam, Glad to hear that you diagnosed your problem and corrected it. I, personally, have found that a modified weaver stance also helps, with the weak hand pulling the stiff arm back. My 70 series has a 18 pound spring, so its easy to weak arm/hand it..........Robin
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Thanks for the suggestion. I've used a full Weaver, mod Weaver, and isosceles stance at various times, and don't find it makes much difference for me, as both arms/hands are of equal strength. I'm also a leftie but working with tools and touch typing is 50-50 so I don't favor either hand. When practicing, I switch left/right and also one/two handed, getting used to quick aim & fire regardless of how I'm holding the pistol.

    Anyway, the arthritis affects both hands as well, so it really hasn't mattered which grip style or stance I used.

    Bottom line, my "instinct learned" grip just wasn't firm enough -- I was gripping with what my hands "thought" was okay but it wasn't enough, and the arthritis was sending false signals. So I had to consciously increase the grip pressure to comp for my stiffness, and when I did, my targeting zeroed in to my older accuracy (not perfect but just fine, self defense @ 20 feet or less with a .45, when you care enough to send the very best, ha ha).

    All I've needed to do now is to retrain myself to use a tighter grip, and that's an easy job once I figgerd out the root problem. Keen. And thanks for the advice.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
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