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kayak question

VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior MemberPosts: 7,565 Senior Member
actually a paddle question, found a deal on C-list for 2 that will work for my son and I.

You can get a kayak for cheap on Craigslist, however to find expedition/sea kayaks that will carry substantial sized persons takes a bit longer. I go 6'1" 265 and the son at 15 is running 6'1" 200. Not in itself hard to find a boat for, however add 6 days 5 nights worth of gear and food and if you want any kind of margin at all, ya gotta go big. I have a friend who has a 14' Old Town Castine and that seemed like it would work, but they are not real available. I found a older Sea Lion 17' which is rated at almost 400 lb and a Perception Carolina 14' which is rated at 300lb.
These are not whitewater kayaks, they are cruisers. Should be fairly fast even loaded.

Anyway.

I need to get some paddles. Best I can figure 230cm's will work for both of our sizes and the width of the boats.

So the questions are; any preferences, any experience with sub 100.00 paddles, different ideas on lengths .....
It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.

Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,437 Senior Member
    The wife and I owned a pair of touring boats by Perception a 16 footer and a 17 footer. Between the fore and aft holds on both of them we could easily pack enough gear for two weeks of touring. Actually, on Lake Michigan, I found my boat handled very well when loaded down...much more stable.

    As to paddles...I went through a few of them before I settled on a classic cedar Inuit paddle - amazing control and a lot of speed for the effort expanded...(the paddles also "sing" as the move through the water).
    inuitpaddle_zps8ca66508.jpg while touring I kept a shorter "storm paddle" on the boat.

    The wife preferred a carbon fiber two-piece paddle
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,395 Senior Member
    I was going to ask what kind of water you were going to be in, fast, slow, etc. My only experience with expedition, is in a canoe and finding one for two is a lot easier than finding kayaks for two, plus the canoe holds a ton of supplies. My kayak is a sit on top, which allows for easy access to a lot of stuff on deck, but the holds are tight for packing stuff.

    canoe1_zpsb4672589.jpg

    The canoe you see here is the newer brother to the one I had before which was not a square back. It paddled fantastically with two and tracked very well. It was heavy, at about 85 pounds, but steady and stable. This canoe is going to make a 100 mile Mississippi trip this year with my son-in-law and I. We only intend to use the motor if we encounter a headwind we can't overcome, and then, only sparingly.

    Something to consider. Everything you see in the photo (trolling motor mount is home made) was purchased last summer brand new, including trailer for right at $1700, which is less than some top end kayaks.
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,565 Senior Member
    I was going to ask what kind of water you were going to be in, fast, slow, etc. My only experience with expedition, is in a canoe and finding one for two is a lot easier than finding kayaks for two, plus the canoe holds a ton of supplies. My kayak is a sit on top, which allows for easy access to a lot of stuff on deck, but the holds are tight for packing stuff.
    The canoe you see here is the newer brother to the one I had before which was not a square back. It paddled fantastically with two and tracked very well. It was heavy, at about 85 pounds, but steady and stable. This canoe is going to make a 100 mile Mississippi trip this year with my son-in-law and I. We only intend to use the motor if we encounter a headwind we can't overcome, and then, only sparingly.

    Something to consider. Everything you see in the photo (trolling motor mount is home made) was purchased last summer brand new, including trailer for right at $1700, which is less than some top end kayaks.
    I own 2 good canoes and have run over 100mi in a single trip. First is a 1971 17' Grumman Eagle (800lb) and the other is a 2001 Old Town Discovery 169 (1100lb). I also have 2 old beat fiberglass ones that need a little help.
    In the last 2 years I have about 250 miles tripping in them. A peice of advice, lose the motor, find backrests. You are going to have a lot of drag with the squareback as it is. Unless you are going to go where the water takes you the whole way, it is going to be enough work without the extra weight. Wind sucks, but that weight is going to kick your butt unless you have enough fuel to run it the whole time. If you are carrying all of your food and cooking gear for 2 people you will be heavy enough once you add up the repair stuff, first aid kit, and extra paddle, and personal gear. I bought and retro fitted Old Town seats with backs to the 2001 and I built backrests out of light pipe and backs cut out of a poly 55 gal drum for the Gumman, then bought 2 stadium seats and unzipped the back, slipped the back over the barrel back. Works great. A back rest will save you.
    Old town (fyi, I'm the real good looking one) Aphoto_zpsa9dc9562.jpg
    Grumman (son is the taller one, he has grown about 8 inches since last year)
    DSC_0013_zps30584156.jpg
    Side tip, make a pallet out of light wood or 1 in pvc pipe that will lay in the canoe, screw some luann to it, put your gear on it. You will get water in the boat and that will keep the water under your stuff. 2 ratchet straps secure the gear to the boat and pallet for when you go over.

    The water that we go in (Allegheny River Trail, creeks and tributarys running into it http://www.fishandboat.com/watertrails/alleg/trailmap.htm ). We ran the whole thing last year and have done 60+ in a outing. This year we are looking at about 70, with the first 30 running a creek through the Allegheny National Forest if the water lever is up. The creek ends in a flood control dam so we got the name and number for the Army Corp of Eng guy who controls it to find out if we are going to have water. After that we will portage to the river and continue.

    I am not buying a tandem kayak, I am buying 2 expedition kayaks. Just want to try something different. My total less paddles is 750. They are not pretty or new, and I will have to put new rigging on both, but if they keep water out, then that is the right price to try kayaking. If I fall in love I might buy a newer one, but scratching a 350.00 kayak on rocks doesnt bother me as much as scratching a 2700.00 one.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,395 Senior Member
    Squarebacks don't paddle worth a crap. The motor is there just to get us out of trouble. I did some querying the Army Corp about the length of the river we intend to run and the time of year and if we didn't paddle at all - and the wind didn't hit us in the face, we could drift the entire distance in 30 hours. Food? Can you say: "MRE?" Water and beer notwithstanding, a case of MREs makes up the provisions. If you haven't tried them, it's all I ever use now when camping and hunting. No need for fire or additional cooking utensils. Leftover trash is negligible. I don't mind water cooled beer.

    This will be a 4 day "fishing" trip rather than an "excursion", so we're going to use the motor and trolling motor as much as or more than the paddles to investigate little backwaters and criss-cross the main channel to hit likely fishing spots. We want to fish more than paddle.

    The little Suzy goes 8mph on 1/4 throttle and it sips gas. Should it quit working, we have several public take out points along the way that we can use to terminate early, but one 5 gallon can could run the entire distance. We'll be packing 8 gallons. We don't weigh much, and I already have floors in the canoe to keep things dry and to offer stand-to-cast platforms. They're made of luan with a platform of pool noodles bolted to the underside to offer a little springiness.

    Already have the seat backs. They'll go on for the trip. I don't use them when I'm fishing normally, as I spend nearly all my time standing to cast. I'm a fisherman first...and this is my "Bass Boat."

    Best to you. take plenty of photos.

    Dan
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,496 Senior Member
    Aquabound has a great chart to aid in selecting a kayak paddle. Your height.and width od kayak determine proper length. My SOT kayaks are on the wide side and I prefer a long paddle so go with I think a 240 cm paddle. But find a wight and length you like and go.for it. Compare.carbon fibre and plastic side by side. What you think will be similar.might be a huge difference.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,565 Senior Member
    Squarebacks don't paddle worth a crap. The motor is there just to get us out of trouble. I did some querying the Army Corp about the length of the river we intend to run and the time of year and if we didn't paddle at all - and the wind didn't hit us in the face, we could drift the entire distance in 30 hours.
    We had 4-5 mph water for the 107mi, almost to fast on the Allegheny. Made good time, fishing stunk though.
    Food? Can you say: "MRE?" Water and beer notwithstanding, a case of MREs makes up the provisions. If you haven't tried them, it's all I ever use now when camping and hunting. No need for fire or additional cooking utensils. Leftover trash is negligible.
    Yes I have. Although they are head and shoulders over C-rats, I will stick with my pocket rocket and homemade dehydrated stuff. VM, don't go hungry on a trip. Mostly I make chicken alfredo, or red beans and rice with burger, or something along those lines. The MRE chem bag wont heat enough coffee. If you want to try something different along the same lines, the Mountain House stuff is pretty good. You have to add hot water though.

    Best to you. take plenty of photos.

    Dan
    You to.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,565 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Aquabound has a great chart to aid in selecting a kayak paddle. Your height.and width od kayak determine proper length. My SOT kayaks are on the wide side and I prefer a long paddle so go with I think a 240 cm paddle. But find a wight and length you like and go.for it. Compare.carbon fibre and plastic side by side. What you think will be similar.might be a huge difference.
    They are sit in. IAW the chart for both of us with the boat width, 230-240 is what comes up. Are these charts pretty close? From what I am reading shorter is not a bad thing, so I am figuring on a pair of 230's.

    Other questions that come up.... Feather, yes or no? Apparently the feather is for moving the high paddle through the air and is tougher on the wrists. Non feather is traditional but can be more work in a breeze.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,496 Senior Member
    To be honest we have both. I prefer the traditional blade especially when fishing. Daughter likes the feather but I think only because her boyfriend said it was better. Sorry about typing im on my phone and only have a connection bear the window of the hotel in canada.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
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