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Got Glass?

KurtKurt New MemberPosts: 21 New Member
I ordered a Savage 11/111 Long Range Hunter (adjustable cheek piece, AccuStock, AccuTrigger, adjustable muzzle brake) in 7 mm Remington Magnum.
All I have to do is go to the shop to pick it up.

The factory uses Federal Premium Nosler 150 Ballistic Tip ammunition to verify accuracy. I had already planned on using the Ballistic Tip LR projectile. The 150 grain weight seems to be correct for the 1:9.5 barrel twist so that’s where I will start in working up a load.

My next project is researching a telescopic sight for this rig and I’m thinking 12 to 14 power with a custom turret built for my load (intended for game up to and including elk).
The working budget is limited as I would like to keep the scope’s cost equal to or less than the cost of the rifle (900 + tax).

Do any of you fine contributors have a suggestion on where to begin my search as to make and/or model?

Thanks,
KL
“The rifle is a weapon. Let there be no mistake about that. It is a tool of power, and thus dependent completely upon the moral stature of its user.”
Col. Jeff Cooper

Replies

  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    At what ranges do you expect to take shots on game?
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...I'd use the Leupold 4.5X14 VX3 CDS as a base model & start comparing prices & features from there, things like eye relief, weight, length, over sized objective bells that require higher mounting to clear the bolt handle, available reticles, etc., etc., etc. Personal, if I was using it for elk, I would consider a heavier, "harder" bullet, meself...
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,581 Senior Member
    wildgene wrote: »
    ...I'd use the Leupold 4.5X14 VX3 CDS as a base model & start comparing prices & features from there, things like eye relief, weight, length, over sized objective bells that require higher mounting to clear the bolt handle, available reticles, etc., etc., etc. Personal, if I was using it for elk, I would consider a heavier, "harder" bullet, meself...

    This.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    wildgene wrote: »
    ...I'd use the Leupold 4.5X14 VX3 CDS as a base model & start comparing prices & features from there, things like eye relief, weight, length, over sized objective bells that require higher mounting to clear the bolt handle, available reticles, etc., etc., etc. Personal, if I was using it for elk, I would consider a heavier, "harder" bullet, meself...

    Me too. That's the scope I have on my 6.5-284, Savage LRH.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    wildgene wrote: »
    ...I'd use the Leupold 4.5X14 VX3 CDS as a base model & start comparing prices & features from there, things like eye relief, weight, length, over sized objective bells that require higher mounting to clear the bolt handle, available reticles, etc., etc., etc. Personal, if I was using it for elk, I would consider a heavier, "harder" bullet, meself...

    That's the exact scope I chose for my .280AI with a 40mm OB. But I do have a Burris E1 in that same power I'm well pleased with.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 5,040 Senior Member
    I have a 4.5 x 14 Burris Posi Loc on my CZ-550 in .270, its a great scope, never had any problems with it.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    wildgene wrote: »
    ...I'd use the Leupold 4.5X14 VX3 CDS as a base model & start comparing prices & features from there, things like eye relief, weight, length, over sized objective bells that require higher mounting to clear the bolt handle, available reticles, etc., etc., etc. Personal, if I was using it for elk, I would consider a heavier, "harder" bullet, meself...

    ...additional goodies you might consider, if I was planning on shooting small groups past 300yds., I would add the AO, if it's a dedicated "big game rifle" & the large majority of your shots will be @ under 500yds. I'd subscribe to the "KISS Principle" & forego the AO. Illuminated reticles, well, I sure they serve some purpose, but for me, it's back to "KISS"...
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    wildgene wrote: »
    ...additional goodies you might consider, if I was planning on shooting small groups past 300yds., I would add the AO, if it's a dedicated "big game rifle" & the large majority of your shots will be @ under 500yds. I'd subscribe to the "KISS Principle" & forego the AO. Illuminated reticles, well, I sure they serve some purpose, but for me, it's back to "KISS"...

    Again, couldn't agree more. I love AOs, but not on a dedicated hunting rifle.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,763 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    Again, couldn't agree more. I love AOs, but not on a dedicated hunting rifle.

    I love AO's, even on dedicated hunting rigs. I leave mine set at 500 yards. If the animal is closer than that, I just walk backwards until I've got them right where I want them.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    At what ranges do you expect to take shots on game?

    He said elk...so mountain ranges I'd assume? :tooth:
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,581 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    I love AO's, even on dedicated hunting rigs. I leave mine set at 500 yards. If the animal is closer than that, I just walk backwards until I've got them right where I want them.

    Mike

    Unless you're using your .270 Win. Then..........you move in to about 35 yards. And take 1 more big step before shooting. Then, approach and beat the animal to death with the rifle.

    Right?
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Unless you're using your .270 Win. Then..........you move in to about 35 yards. And take 1 more big step before shooting. Then, approach and beat the animal to death with the rifle.

    Right?

    The act of chambering a rifle in .270Win immediately reduces even blunt force trauma of the rifle itself to little more than pillow fight quality.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • best defensebest defense New Member Posts: 8 New Member
    When I started out, I thought a Bushnell was a good scope, but that was 50 years ago. Later I went to work at Leupold and now own several of their products, but the last scope I purchased is for long range target shooting, and that one is a NightForce. Just so you know, NightForce are kind of expensive but after seeing what other competitors were using, I bit the bullet and looked online where I found a used one. Still paid over a grand for it, but I can see bullet holes at 300 yards when I turn it up to 42 power.
    .
    As far as hunting goes, you will most likely get what you pay for, so if you go out and buy a telescopic sight for $150, it is not likely to give you a sight picture at dusk as well as a scope you pay $300 for.

    When you look thru a telescopic sight, hold it up to your eye at a point where you get a view that seems to encompass the entire lens. Then check out the edges of the viewing area. If the edges seem to be a bit wavy, cloudy or hazy, that is not very good quality glass. Move your head a little bit sideways and then back. If the cross hairs seem to move on the target, there is something out of alignment inside. Don't buy that one.
    .
    Next turn the scope around backwards and look thru the big end. Shine a small light into that end and see if the inside of the scope looks clean. If it looks like there is dust or anything in there that is not actually part of the scope, understand that whatever is in there can end up on the inside lenses. That is not good for you.
    .
    Most of the scopes made in China are not very good quality. Most of the scopes that are made in Japan, Europe and many of the scopes made in the US are pretty good. Just because a scope has a name that sounds like it is probably American does not mean it was made in the US.
    .
    Most scopes say they have coated lenses. Only the scopes that say they have "fully coated" lenses actually transmit the maximum amount of light.
    .
    These are just things to look for, and not much of a guide as far as brand name goes.
    One rule of thumb says that your scope should cost as much as the rifle, and some say twice as much for dependable quality.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Kurt wrote: »
    I ordered a Savage 11/111 Long Range Hunter (adjustable cheek piece, AccuStock, AccuTrigger, adjustable muzzle brake) in 7 mm Remington Magnum.
    All I have to do is go to the shop to pick it up.

    The factory uses Federal Premium Nosler 150 Ballistic Tip ammunition to verify accuracy. I had already planned on using the Ballistic Tip LR projectile. The 150 grain weight seems to be correct for the 1:9.5 barrel twist so that’s where I will start in working up a load.

    My next project is researching a telescopic sight for this rig and I’m thinking 12 to 14 power with a custom turret built for my load (intended for game up to and including elk).
    The working budget is limited as I would like to keep the scope’s cost equal to or less than the cost of the rifle (900 + tax).

    Do any of you fine contributors have a suggestion on where to begin my search as to make and/or model?

    Thanks,
    KL

    For the rifle you described, if you don't mind spending $800-$900 for the scope, I would recommend a Leupold VX-3L in 4.5-14 variable range. The VX-3L has the advantage of the indentation in the bottom of the objective lens which allows a lower profile over the bore axis. This allows the shooter to keep his cheek firmly against the butt stock instead of allowing his head to bob around. This is highly conducive to accuracy, unless you have an adjustable cheek weld as on some stock models. I only own one scope in this class, a 4.5-14 x 56 mm VX-3L.
    The size or power of the scope doesn't have as much to do with the game hunted as it does the range and conditions the rifle will be more frequently shot at. There are people that hunt with fixed 3 or 4 power scopes that hunt everything from varmints to Elk and Moose, and there are people that use scopes up to 20 power and beyond for the same game. It's more a matter of shot distance and shooting conditions that dictate scope size and power. Now a dangerous game rifle is a bit different since most shots will be within 100 yards and a wide field of view is desireable for close shots and dangerous game because you can pick up on running game faster.
    There are many scopes out there that will fit your purpose, however the VX-3 L does allow these benefits, plus they are very clear and very dependable with a life time warranty.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,982 Senior Member
    Change that Ballistic Tip to an Accubond or E-Tip (if you want to stick with Nosler at least). Yes people use NBT's for elk, and people also win the lottery from time to time. Better not bank on those choices being safe.

    As for the scope, the suggested Leupolds would be where I'd spend my money most likely, if I had to have custom nobs and such.
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