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I gotta think Ohio whitetails are slighty nuts

Six-GunSix-Gun Senior MemberPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
First there was that young buck I stalked up behind in a local park. Then, yesterday I went to scout a new section of a public hunting area since one side of it didn't produce a single trail camera pic of a deer after a week in the woods. I picked a new area via Google maps and walked to the new area, camera in hand. Lo and behold, I hit the area I thought looked good on satellite and a doe blasts loose out of the grass just a few yards away. Now, a Nebraska doe would have run until she reached China. This Ohio doe? She took two bounds about 10 yards out and then proceeded to stare at me for a minute or so straight before I slowly walked away, fully expecting her to flee the moment I moved again. Nope. She stayed put and watched me "leave." By "leave," I mean that I tucked behind the closest tall brush to where I was just standing and waited to see if she would move close to me a gain when she felt comfortable. Sure enough, she came around the same corner from where I just was and stared me down again for another minute or so. Wow, these are not the whitetails I'm used to encountering. I hope they stay this curious during the season!
Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.

Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    The young, dumb ones don't last much past opening weekend. Tennessee bow season starts about mid-September, and centerfire rifle season ends up in early January. Between those dates we can take 3 does a day with very few "closed season" exceptions, and 3 bucks all season. By the time centerfire rifle season opens up around Thanksgiving, it's usually necessary to hunt pretty hard to score. They get educated pretty quickly!
    Jerry
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 13,086 Senior Member
    She stopped and looked at her watch and realized it was still August and she noticed you were not armed, this will all change once you have your weapon of choice in your hand:bang:
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    Good thing you are married Luis... the Ohio women are a little nutty too!

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,646 Senior Member
    I wonder if she had a young fawn lying in the brush somewhere close by?
    It's a little late for them to be dropping around here, but knowing you're further north, it might be about that time there :confused:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    You're lucky - that was one of the viciously carnivorous Eastern predator deer. She was taking a close look to see if you would be good to eat.:tooth:
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    Good thing you are married Luis... the Ohio women are a little nutty too!

    D

    Hah! So I've heard. I think my Mrs. think I'm a little nuts chasing deer spots a month before the season opens, but that's alright. She never complains when we have fresh venison for the freezer.
    knitepoet wrote: »
    I wonder if she had a young fawn lying in the brush somewhere close by?
    It's a little late for them to be dropping around here, but knowing you're further north, it might be about that time there :confused:

    You never know. There are a LOT of spotted fawns running around right now. Every trail cam location I set up on base turned up does with one or two young fawns with them, so it wouldn't surprise me to see a mature doe like this with a little one hiding nearby.
    Bigslug wrote: »
    You're lucky - that was one of the viciously carnivorous Eastern predator deer. She was taking a close look to see if you would be good to eat.:tooth:

    The Monty Python deer, eh? :devil:
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    It's not just Ohio. Last month I started for the mailbox and a doe walked in front of me in the yard not 10 feet away and stopped and watched me get the mail, and didn't move when I came back within a few feet of her on the way to the front door. She was much more interested in the White Dutch clover bordering the spring branch than she was interested in me.

    Last week I was setting up a pistol target in the back yard, and when I looked up three does were standing in the woods five yards from me watching me. I walked towards them at an angle as I walked back to the temporary table I'd set up, and they didn't move, just stood and did the head bobbing up and down and side to side. I suspect I'd interrupted them on their way to the spring branch for water, and an attack on the clover in the back yard. They weren't young does, either. When I started shooting, they just eased up in the woods out of sight.

    As soon as muzzleloader season opens, they'll be sneaky and easily spooked.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    See that's awesome. It has to be cool to have a setup where you can not only shoot on your own property, but also see wildlife at close range.

    Out here, as much as I am shocked to see a typically skittish, wild animal basically blow off a human well within its comfort zone (especially in a public hunting area), I feel so blessed to be able to have such a treat occur before me, if only for a few more weeks.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    When you get tired of chasing those yamdankee deer, come on down to Tennessee!
    Jerry
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    When you get tired of chasing those yamdankee deer, come on down to Tennessee!
    Jerry

    I think that has to happen. When is your muzzleloader season down there and (if you know it) the damage for a non-res permit for the aforementioned? At some point, I gotta kill a deer with this .54cal flinter o' mine.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    See that's awesome. It has to be cool to have a setup where you can not only shoot on your own property, but also see wildlife at close range.

    I have turkey hens that nest in the grown up field across the road. They come to the spring branch to wet their feathers, and eat a little clover in the yard. When the poults hatch out they bring them into the yard to chase bugs. As long as I don't approach, they just mind the 'kids'.

    I couldn't live any other way; tried it in town and the subdivision thing, and slowly went nuts until I got back out to a farm again. :-) I can't see any of my neighbor's houses from my yard, front, rear, or side. The animal neighbors do visit quite often, though.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I think that has to happen. When is your muzzleloader season down there and (if you know it) the damage for a non-res permit for the aforementioned? At some point, I gotta kill a deer with this .54cal flinter o' mine.

    Smokepole season begins November 8th. and goes to 11/24. Then centerfire season starts 11/25 and goes through Jan. 4th. Of course, using a ML is also allowed during centerfire season, and the bag limit is the same.

    A 7-day "all game" nonresident license is $175.50. The annual "all game" license that covers the whole season is $251.00 if you decide one trip isn't enough to scratch the itch! Licenses can be purchased online and all the hunting/fishing regulations are available at TWRA.gov (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency). Come on down!
    Jerry
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Smokepole season begins November 8th. and goes to 11/24. Then centerfire season starts 11/25 and goes through Jan. 4th. Of course, using a ML is also allowed during centerfire season, and the bag limit is the same.

    A 7-day "all game" nonresident license is $175.50. The annual "all game" license that covers the whole season is $251.00 if you decide one trip isn't enough to scratch the itch! Licenses can be purchased online and all the hunting/fishing regulations are available at TWRA.gov (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency). Come on down!
    Jerry

    The season pass ain't a bad price to pay at all considering that Tennessee is well within a days drive from me now. I could easily justify a weekend at a time over the course of the winter. One other important question on that note: can you hunt Sundays in TN?
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    The season pass ain't a bad price to pay at all considering that Tennessee is well within a days drive from me now. I could easily justify a weekend at a time over the course of the winter. One other important question on that note: can you hunt Sundays in TN?

    Yes. Hunting on Sunday is allowed.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Sweet - this is sounding very doable.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    i believe the bag limits over east where Mike lives are a bit different, and possibly season opening/closing dates as well. I was quoting the rules from middle Tennessee that apply to approximately half the counties in the midstate area. Fees are the same statewide, and the only quota or "draw" situations for licenses are for wildlife management areas. As always, private land offers less hunting pressure and sometimes better chances for success than hunting public land. I can't begin to make a dent in the deer population on my 100 acres so feel free to come help me out!
    Jerry
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    i believe the bag limits over east where Mike lives are a bit different, and possibly season opening/closing dates as well. I was quoting the rules from middle Tennessee that apply to approximately half the counties in the midstate area. Fees are the same statewide, and the only quota or "draw" situations for licenses are for wildlife management areas. As always, private land offers less hunting pressure and sometimes better chances for success than hunting public land. I can't begin to make a dent in the deer population on my 100 acres so feel free to come help me out!
    Jerry

    I'd be honored and I promise to make a solid effort with the smokepole (the real one) given all of the help you have given me getting it running properly. Considered it a high possibility. Throwing a dart at a Google map near the center of the state, it looks like I'm only about I'm only 5.5 hours from Murfreesboro.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    We're due south of Nashville, about 5 miles from the Interstate 65/Alabama state line.
    Jerry
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Even better! Only a shade over 5 hours to you.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,646 Senior Member
    Don't forget you've got a 2 year old invite to come 3 hours past Teach's and try a Bama deer on for size.
    I kept trying to get you to borrow a flight to Maxwell AFB.

    Ask Lt SS3, he gave it a whirl last season.

    Saw one, but couldn't get a shot at it.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Oh, that will happen at some point soon now that I'm close enough to get to you by vehicle. The borrowing a flight thing would work out just about anywhere else, but since Wright-Patterson is a reserve base only, it's tough to get Space-A rides pretty much anywhere.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    i believe the bag limits over east where Mike lives are a bit different, and possibly season opening/closing dates as well. I was quoting the rules from middle Tennessee that apply to approximately half the counties in the midstate area. Fees are the same statewide, and the only quota or "draw" situations for licenses are for wildlife management areas. As always, private land offers less hunting pressure and sometimes better chances for success than hunting public land. I can't begin to make a dent in the deer population on my 100 acres so feel free to come help me out!
    Jerry

    Bag limits are different over here. I'm in a different unit. Buck limit for season is the same, but does are only legal during archery and muzzleloader season. I'd have to look it up as to how many can be taken. You live in the area known as 'haired over with deer'. :tooth:

    Here's the link to the TWRA site for Units and seasons. Teach is in Unit L, and I'm in Unit A.

    http://www.tn.gov/twra/deerseasons.html
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Thanks, tennmike. I was just digging through that page and definitely took note of how liberal the bag limits are in the L region that Tech is in. The deer must be really thick!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Thanks, tennmike. I was just digging through that page and definitely took note of how liberal the bag limits are in the L region that Tech is in. The deer must be really thick!

    A couple counties West of Teach they are thick as hair on a dogs back, and a real pain if you're a farmer. There's a reason for that, though. The closer you get to Memphis or Nashville, the more land that has been leased by hunting clubs, and they have failed miserably at controlling the doe population. Most of them are more interested in big antlers than meat, and the deer population continues to explode. I've got some dairy farmer friends over there that tried the lease thing. The hunters only killed bucks and the does were left untouched. My dairy friends wouldn't renew the leases after a few years due to being unable to get the 'horn hunters' to heavily cull the does. One of them gets permits from the TWRA to kill them year round and has a few trusted guys come in and kill every deer they see. The deer are dumped in a trench dug by a bulldozer and covered up. Permit doesn't allow giving the meat away. The others let in hunters that have proven they know the difference between a deer and a Holstein or Jersey cow, and don't shoot up the place. And they are required to kill every deer that they can. Any meat they don't want gets donated.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I was returning from a wrecker call about daylight one morning, and counted 19 deer in the pasture directly across from my house, within 200 yards of our front door. It's not uncommon to see a roadkill every 10 miles or so on the interstate. Down in the Elk river bottoms just south of our place there are some soybean fields that average 50-60 acres each, and seeing 10-20 deer at a time getting fat on beans in every field is an everyday thing.
    Jerry
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