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Squirrel hunting question.

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  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Our limit on squirrels is 12 a day. My goal is to make 12 kills in one day, all head shots using my little .32cal flintlock! Ain't nowhere near reached that goal yet, and doubt I ever will since I'm older'n dirt now!

    EDIT: If you're interested.....a grey squirrel's diet is about 85% vegetative in the form of leaf buds, tender bark on new growth, nuts and fruits produced such as wild cherries, persimmons, etc. About 15% is protein in the form of large insects, small lizzards, tree frogs, young birds in the nest, etc.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Our limit on squirrels is 12 a day. My goal is to make 12 kills in one day, all head shots using my little .32cal flintlock! Ain't nowhere near reached that goal yet, and doubt I ever will since I'm older'n dirt now!

    EDIT: If you're interested.....a grey squirrel's diet is about 85% vegetative in the form of leaf buds, tender bark on new growth, nuts and fruits produced such as wild cherries, persimmons, etc. About 15% is protein in the form of large insects, small lizzards, tree frogs, young birds in the nest, etc.

    Good stuff. I never had a clue that they ate meat protien at all.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Our limit on squirrels is 12 a day. My goal is to make 12 kills in one day, all head shots using my little .32cal flintlock! Ain't nowhere near reached that goal yet, and doubt I ever will since I'm older'n dirt now!

    EDIT: If you're interested.....a grey squirrel's diet is about 85% vegetative in the form of leaf buds, tender bark on new growth, nuts and fruits produced such as wild cherries, persimmons, etc. About 15% is protein in the form of large insects, small lizzards, tree frogs, young birds in the nest, etc.

    I like my .32 caplock rifle for squirrels. Makes it a lot more interesting hunt, and pushes me to be accurate with my shots.

    And squirrels do have a pretty varied diet. Up here they really go for the dogwood berries when they turn red in the fall. Must have no taste buds, as dogwood berries taste nasty! They do have a pretty varied diet, as you outlined. Considering what a squirrel eats, and what a hog WILL eat, squirrels are much the cleaner animal as to diet.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    I like my .32 caplock rifle for squirrels. Makes it a lot more interesting hunt, and pushes me to be accurate with my shots.

    And squirrels do have a pretty varied diet. Up here they really go for the dogwood berries when they turn red in the fall. Must have no taste buds, as dogwood berries taste nasty! They do have a pretty varied diet, as you outlined. Considering what a squirrel eats, and what a hog WILL eat, squirrels are much the cleaner animal as to diet.

    I agree. Even with a few bugs thrown in, that's still a pretty pure diet. Heck, even us humans have been known to suck in a mosquito or two now and then...................:jester:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    So what happened to the OP? He was given a ton of great input that wasn't too judgemental along with some useful technics and recipes and then just disappeared. Almost like he was trolling and was expecting responses more like "ah just kill em an leave em there for the coyotes".
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,637 Senior Member
    One thing to consider is also the time of the year you shoot your squirrels. Right now the squirrels in my area have botfly larvae in them (aka wolves) and the infestations can last into the start of hunting season. I wouldn't eat a squirrel that had that problem...
    Overkill is underrated.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    One thing to consider is also the time of the year you shoot your squirrels. Right now the squirrels in my area have botfly larvae in them (aka wolves) and the infestations can last into the start of hunting season. I wouldn't eat a squirrel that had that problem...

    That's why I wait until after Thanksgiving to hunt squirrels. By that time, the larva are gone and the squirrel has had plenty of time to heal and get healthy.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    That's why I wait until after Thanksgiving to hunt squirrels. By that time, the larva are gone and the squirrel has had plenty of time to heal and get healthy.

    I treat them and rabbits like persimmons, no good til after a frost. As a kid I hunted them during the spring season as an excuse to get out in the woods and sharpen my stalking and marksmanship skills.
    But no more, they were absolutely covered in fleas. These days I sneak in a hunt or two between the various deer seasons.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    I treat them and rabbits like persimmons, no good til after a frost. As a kid I hunted them during the spring season as an excuse to get out in the woods and sharpen my stalking and marksmanship skills.
    But no more, they were absolutely covered in fleas. These days I sneak in a hunt or two between the various deer seasons.

    Hunting the spring season or early fall, the fleas and TICKS are pretty active, and on the critters. During bow deer season here, the deer have plenty of ticks, too. Kill a deer, field dress it, and hang it up to skin and leave it for an hour, and ticks seem to rain off them.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Hunting the spring season or early fall, the fleas and TICKS are pretty active, and on the critters. During bow deer season here, the deer have plenty of ticks, too. Kill a deer, field dress it, and hang it up to skin and leave it for an hour, and ticks seem to rain off them.

    Here too but the critters ain't the only thing to pick up ticks and chiggers when it's warm in the woods. And seed ticks can find interesting places to attach themselves.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Here too but the critters ain't the only thing to pick up ticks and chiggers when it's warm in the woods. And seed ticks can find interesting places to attach themselves.

    Seed ticks. Some interesting stories about seed ticks and their unusual places to sit down for a meal have been told on this forum. :rotflmao:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Seed ticks. Some interesting stories about seed ticks and their unusual places to sit down for a meal have been told on this forum. :rotflmao:

    I'll take your word for it. I've seen Jerm's full moon, cpj in spandex, Wambli's Manties and olesniper's photoshops of buffco. I finally bought a controlling interest in a vertically integrated eye bleach consortium and still I cannot unsee these images.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,460 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Seed ticks. Some interesting stories about seed ticks and their unusual places to sit down for a meal have been told on this forum. :rotflmao:

    Satan is the spawn of seed ticks.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,511 Senior Member
    I used to hunt with a gal that found a couple of those little bastards in her girl parts....really awkward since she was the only female hunting in the group of guys....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,807 Senior Member
    Don't get me started on seed ticks. Before the fire ants invaded and drastically impacted the tick and chigger populations, they were the bain of my existence, as a land surveyor. Snakes, hornets, bees, wasps, asps, nor any of the stickery, stingy things affected me to the extent that ticks and chiggers did. I've had to have shots on a couple of occasions to neutralize the effects of simply having too many seed tick bites - this was nothing to do with tick fever or lyme's disease, although I was afraid it was, at the time - just too many insect bites on a continuing basis, causing high fever.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,213 Senior Member
    I didn't know fire ants ate ticks. Good for them. At least they serve some useful purpose in life other than digging huge holes in the ground. I remember when they were confined mostly to FL and S GA, at least I think I do. This was about 1957 and I read about them in "My Weekly Reader," a sort of elementary school newspaper. Could have been later.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
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