Colt Single Action Frontier Scout .22

WeiandWeiand New MemberPosts: 17 New Member
Single Action Colt Frontier Scout .22 LR
It has been sitting in a box since late 1968
Was pretty much clean to start with. Fired 6 rounds with it. The site is off about 4 inches to the right & unless I'm mistaken, there is no way to adjust the site.
Other than that, smooth operation, nice little pop.
Best I can tell by the numbers, 220xxx F is that it is a Q model made 1967, but correct me if I'm wrong.
The biggest thing I was wondering about is the cylinder release. Unlike the RG 66 I've got & other Single Actions I've seen, instead of a "push button" it has a set screw.
Is that normal for this?
Any info or corrections on what I "think" it is would be greatly appreciated.



Replies

  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,999 Senior Member
    Yes, it has a screw instead of a spring loaded release. See attached video. You may need to give it a little shot of penetrating oil to loosen it up. Nice little pistol. I recently found on in the Buntline Special, but couldn't by it in Wisconsin since I'm not a resident here. They already hate me enough around here, anyhow!!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UrDOTkzxUA
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,325 Senior Member
    I've seen VERY FEW of these Colt-made .22LR SAs here (Probably 5-6) but at least a couple of them showed the same shooting behavior you describe, and after checking them carefully, owners found that the front sight was misaligned regarding the gun's vertical axis, thus canted a few degrees to either side. This issue also showed in the adjustable sight models that weren't allowed to hit properly even after completely moving the rear sight to either side.

    In both cases they had to ask for help, so gunsmiths either removed and re-soldered the front sights in their proper places, or turned the barrel a few degrees in the correct direction (When the proper cylinder gap allowed this); this solved the problem.

    If that's not your case, maybe you should try different types/brands of ammo (Fortunately there are a lot of available options, specially regarding speed, bullet type and weight) until you find those (Or maybe "the one") that hits P.O.A. as intended. Luckily, and knowing how different .22LR ammo behaves in guns, you'll end up with a few choices that work.

    Nice revolver!
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,549 Senior Member
    Weiand wrote: »
    Fired 6 rounds with it. The site is off about 4 inches to the right & unless I'm mistaken, there is no way to adjust the site.
    Other than that, smooth operation, nice little pop.

    I'm assuming that you are fairly new to handgun shooting, so correct me if I'm wrong. But, if you are, it is very common to think a handgun does not shoot accurately, if you don't have decent mechanics and a few hundred rounds down range.

    I'm just sayin' - shoot it a lot before you start making modifications to an old Colt.
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,101 Senior Member
    welcome,

    yes, the older colts didn't have any "push button" releases. There were some aftermarket systems but good luck finding one since they were small and could easily be lost/dropped. If you have any gun parts dealers in your area or local gun shows then you may find one there.

    as far as the birthdate for your toys, its in the ball park. just realize that the assembly process was done in batches and its not an exact date when your gun was assembled.

    some comments.

    If you want to learn more about those colt 22 SAAs, There is a book out "Colt: Scouts, Peacemakers and New Frontiers in .22 Caliber" by Don Wilkerson. He and i suspect his wife spent a lot of time in the colt archives doing this research. I had a chance to meet him and his wife just before his passing and when he was more or less "promoting" this new book. They are still being sold by his wife and it has also of info in it.

    one other comment is that your grips are aftermarket according to this book.

    some of the SAAs are POA/POI but some aren't. If you decide to shoot it more just do sighing the old cowboy way.

    good luck and have fun.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Thanks for the info as well as the welcome.
    I got the date from a chart showing the numbers. I know it was purchased in late 1967 to early 1968 by my uncle before he was drafted in late 1968.
    I'm new to single action, so it was a learning experience as well as a bit of a walk back in time.
    Both the Colt & the RG were pretty clean. Each came apart nicely. Just fired 6 rounds in each to test fire them and they prob won't be shot again.
    Used old Peters rounds that had been sitting with them in the same box that the several packets of patches that had the price on the card..... $0.25 for a 50 pack. :)
    Now that they are cleaned again they will both just be left as is. I'm thinking a snap cap for each and some sort of display box.
    The Colt was my uncles & the RG was my grandathers.
    I'm still looking up info on a .32 special Winchester & a .22 Savage
    I'll look around for that book as well.
    Again, thanks for the info & the welcome.
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,101 Senior Member
    Weiand wrote: »
    Thanks for the info as well as the welcome.
    I got the date from a chart showing the numbers. I know it was purchased in late 1967 to early 1968 by my uncle before he was drafted in late 1968.
    I'm new to single action, so it was a learning experience as well as a bit of a walk back in time.
    Both the Colt & the RG were pretty clean. Each came apart nicely. Just fired 6 rounds in each to test fire them and they prob won't be shot again.
    Used old Peters rounds that had been sitting with them in the same box that the several packets of patches that had the price on the card..... $0.25 for a 50 pack. :)
    Now that they are cleaned again they will both just be left as is. I'm thinking a snap cap for each and some sort of display box.
    The Colt was my uncles & the RG was my grandathers.
    I'm still looking up info on a .32 special Winchester & a .22 Savage
    I'll look around for that book as well.
    Again, thanks for the info & the welcome.


    No problem.

    just an fyi, most guns are test fired at the factory so in my opinion, no gun is cherry unless some custom manufacture can say so, but i would be leery of that first shot especially if i was behind the trigger.

    also, if you wanted to, you could (or have a knowledgeable gun smith) bend the front sight to compensate for windage. Some times they would file down the sight lower the POI. but its hard to add material to it.

    the colt is rare since they dont make them anymore and once Wilkersons book came out, the prices skyrocketed on some of them. I was at the start of my collecting them when his book came out so i was able to feel the price increase with each one i purchased. at one time you couldn't give them away, but after his book came out, its not so anymore. He was also working on a Colt Double Action 22s research when he passed away. I was hoping his wife would continue, but I'm not sure it will happen now.

    As i mentioned, his book on them is a wealth of information. He even goes into approximate production numbers.

    good luck.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Won't be making any changes or mods to it. A lot of sentimental value on both pistols, look nice & the single action has a neat look to it. Both will just be on display for me to look at.
    The Colt was in a cowboy style holster & belt, the litterally looks unused, which had to have been bought at the same time as the colt was. Bought in late '67 Early '68 then drafted in late '68, so really not even much time to use / carry / shoot / etc. with it. Best I can tell, it was cleaned and put away when he was drafted. It just sat there. He didn't come back home so it just sat where he had left it.
    If I can find that book hopfully I can find out more about the grips. Besides the grips should be all original.
    Thanks again.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,887 Senior Member
    Welcome aboard
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,999 Senior Member
    Nice history on both pieces and sorry about your uncle not making it back!!
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Just couple pics of the holster & belt that was with the Colt.



  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,367 Senior Member
    Bought mine in 1969 for $83.50 at K-Mart.

    100_4973.jpg
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Looks great in the box.
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Anyone know or remember what it would have cost in 1967?
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,549 Senior Member
    I would guess about $100 -$150.

    My BIL bought a new Colt .22 Buntline at about that time, and seems like he paid about $150, which I thought was really high, at the time.
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Does seem kinda high for that time
  • WeiandWeiand New Member Posts: 17 New Member
    Found this diagram, just thought I'd share.

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