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Getting ready for the range... loaded some test .243's

BigDanSBigDanS Senior MemberPosts: 6,992 Senior Member
Summer is winding down here and soon it will be time to hit the range with some new loads and guns:

243 test - 100 g Speer Grand Slams and 100g Speer Boat Tail Soft Points , Winchester cases and Winchester large rifle primers
Loaded over H4350, 37g, 37.5g 38g, 38.5g 39g and 39.5 gr

18767252-7BC9-4664-A3AC-1CE29F9AD262_zpszm742gls.jpg

D
"A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:

Replies

  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    And a comment. I had already prepped the brass, so setup, careful measuring powder and weighing rounds, and seating 36 rounds, three hours! The powder is weighed exactly, and every bullet is within 0.1 gr of the others.

    Interesting, the bullets weighed from 99.4gr to 100.6gr. I wonder how much variation in POI is caused by small variences in bullet weight.
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    I'm proud of you.

    You need a Chargemaster. You can load those 36 in 20 min. Precisely.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,466 Senior Member
    3 hours for 36 rounds?

    Wow. I'd give up handloading at that.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • N320AWN320AW Senior Member Posts: 648 Senior Member
    You're sure assessing loads the right way with the one half grain increments.:beer: Good luck.
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    I'm proud of you.

    You need a Chargemaster. You can load those 36 in 20 min. Precisely.

    He'll get there by the sounds.
    Hope you get a winner in there
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Friendly word of warning about how you're packing/sorting the different loads.

    You need to take a sharpie and mark the individual rounds, or put each load in a separate zip-lock bag.

    You'll understand why the first time you accidentally drop and spill one of those boxes. BTDT :cuss:

    I take different color sharpies and either make a line across the primer, fully color the primer or make a mark(s) on the bullet, so if I DO accidentally drop a box, I can still tell what is what.

    I have even gone as far as writing the charge on the case if I have a LOT of different loads to try with similar looking bullets. (A-max, sst)

    Great idea.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...I do the same thing, going black, blue, green, yellow, orange, red from lightest charge to heaviest, respectively. Color coding the primers works for identifying changes in seating depth, too...
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    It takes you 5 minutes EACH ROUND?
    Wow.

    Let me add that I have to setup my bench from storage and take it down which adds 20 minutes or so to the entire process.

    On average, yes. Especially when I am adjusting charges. I would weigh 6 charges, then increase .5 gr, measure 6 and then increase .5 again. I never just throw charges when I am testing. Every charge is weighed as exactly as possible. I can see a Charge Master would be a great help. The jewelry scale I am using to weigh bullets is very exact, but the surface is too small to weigh bullets quickly. I could use a larger platform for that s well.

    If you want to poke even more fun, all the cases were prep'ed and primed prior to loading.

    When doing a test like this, my control freak comes out. I weigh every bullet to be as near as constant as possible. Same primers, exact charges, same bullet weights. If I find a winner, it will be worth it and I will load 100 that way, and most likely I will be less exact.

    I also have some 95 gr Hornady SST's coming. I will likely load them the same way.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,466 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Friendly word of warning about how you're packing/sorting the different loads.

    You need to take a sharpie and mark the individual rounds, or put each load in a separate zip-lock bag.

    You'll understand why the first time you accidentally drop and spill one of those boxes. BTDT :cuss:

    I take different color sharpies and either make a line across the primer, fully color the primer or make a mark(s) on the bullet, so if I DO accidentally drop a box, I can still tell what is what.

    I have even gone as far as writing the charge on the case if I have a LOT of different loads to try with similar looking bullets. (A-max, sst)

    :that:

    I write the powder charge on the case. Cleans off quick with Acetone when I prep the case again.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,466 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »

    On average, yes. Especially when I am adjusting charges. I would weigh 6 charges, then increase .5 gr, measure 6 and then increase .5 again. I never just throw charges when I am testing. Every charge is weighed as exactly as possible. I can see a Charge Master would be a great help. The jewelry scale I am using to weigh bullets is very exact, but the surface is too small to weigh bullets quickly. I could use a larger platform for that s well.

    If you want to poke even more fun, all the cases were prep'ed and primed prior to loading.

    D

    Yes to the Chargemaster and yes to the cases being prepped and primed prior to load work.
    NO........to weighing each bullet. No me.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    FYI-- I found Amax's to be most often (or at least the 6.5mm 140gr's) 139.9 grains well over 70% of the time with the variation for the rest +/- .1 grains. 140gr 6.5mm Sierra Matchkings varied +/- .2 grains.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,466 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    My "tumbler" ((vibratory type) takes sharpie off of brass/nickel quite nicely as well. I use the tumbler to clean the lube off after sizing anyway

    I'm in the dark ages. I don't have a tumbler. I use a paper towel. :p
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,466 Senior Member
    Not desperate enough to get one yet.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Weighing bullets? Yeah. No.
    And keep in mind, whatever the accuracy +or- of your scale is, that's how much off your powder charge and bullets are. So if it weighs to a tenth of a grain, you are off that much.

    I covered this in a scale test about two years ago. The analog scale is very accurate compared to digital for repeating a charge.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
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