Who has a Marlin 336 in .35 Remington?

BigDanSBigDanS Senior MemberPosts: 6,824 Senior Member
I am going to round out my little Marlin lever gun collection with a model 336 in .35 Remington. I am looking a C&R gun ( pre 64 maybe pre 65 by the time I get around to it ) One that has been used and needs some TLC. I have seen them as low at $265.00

Who has one and what do you have to say about it?

D
"A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
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Replies

  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,368 Senior Member
    Not me, but good friend of mine has an old one, probably made in the '70s or so....maybe (Probably) earlier; has been in his family for a while.

    Nice shooter with factory ammo (No scope in it); feels with a tad more "ommph" than a 30-30 and nicely built; not a big fan of a pistol-grip lever action but that's the only thing I can complaint about (Other than the buckhorn sights). Might be a good idea to reload for it.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I bought my son one for his 16th. birthday, and it's been in the family ever since. I used it to take a 225-lb. sow hog on a canned hunt, using a home-brewed 250 grain jacketed round nose at about 1800 FPS. One shot kill, with over 18" of penetration diagonally from ahead of the left front shoulder to just ahead of the right ham.

    10689Hog_Hunt_020.jpg

    It also works well with a 158 grain jacketed softpoint .357 pistol bullet, ahead of an almost-compressed load of IMR 3031 powder. The .35 has more punch than a .30-30, and just slightly more of a rainbow trajectory. Inside of 150 yards, it's a winner on deer or any other medium-sized game. Factory ammo is available in 200 grain jacketed round nose and 150 grain pointed softpoint, but don't load more than one 150 in the tubular magazine. Getting a magazine detonation from pointy bullets resting on the primer of the round ahead of it is unlikely, but even one would be too many!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    My buddy had one. It was a great rifle, but he had problems finding ammo for it, or even components.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,688 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    I bought my son one for his 16th. birthday, and it's been in the family ever since. I used it to take a 225-lb. sow hog on a canned hunt, using a home-brewed 250 grain jacketed round nose at about 1800 FPS. One shot kill, with over 18" of penetration diagonally from ahead of the left front shoulder to just ahead of the right ham.

    10689Hog_Hunt_020.jpg

    It also works well with a 158 grain jacketed softpoint .357 pistol bullet, ahead of an almost-compressed load of IMR 3031 powder. The .35 has more punch than a .30-30, and just slightly more of a rainbow trajectory. Inside of 150 yards, it's a winner on deer or any other medium-sized game. Factory ammo is available in 200 grain jacketed round nose and 150 grain pointed softpoint, but don't load more than one 150 in the tubular magazine. Getting a magazine detonation from pointy bullets resting on the primer of the round ahead of it is unlikely, but even one would be too many!
    Jerry

    This would be a perfect application for lever revolution bullets..........Robin
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,824 Senior Member
    Everything I have read says this is a reloading situation.

    Thanks Jerry!

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,944 Senior Member
    It pretty much is, and finding brass can be problematic. I lucked out in acquiring my brass through gracious friends. Now, I'm just waiting on the particular bullet I want.

    I don't remember the last time I saw factory ammo on a shelf.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I received one as a gift, bought parts from Numrich arms, magazine spring, forend other misc stuff, it was a great rifle, also best for reloading, Norma ammo was not inexpensive.

    I sold it after being offered way too much money.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,229 Senior Member
    I got one a few months ago, A Marlin in .35 Remington. Paid $160 for it. The buttstock got chewed up just back of the wrist due to a guy carrying it while packing a climbing tree stand. I may have to break down and buy a replacement buttstock for it if I can't sand out the chewed up wood as some of the gouges are deep. I have a Williams rear aperture sight with front sight set ready to put on it when I get the buttstock problem worked out.

    I have plenty of brass and bullets for it, as I also load .35 Rem. for a Remington Model 14 pump rifle I own.

    Once, if ever, the hoarders get enough ammunition, the .35 Rem. will become more available along with everything else. Obama has a LOT of faults, but he is the best gun and ammunition salesman EVER!
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • englishbobenglishbob Member Posts: 35 Member
    I have one, a 1966 vintage, which is a particularly rare beast in the UK.... Locating a bag of 50 cases took nigh on a year and boy, did I pay through the nose for them!

    Couldn't get any "proper" .35 Rem bullets, but located some Sierra 357 180gn Silhouette bullets and I tried some 158gn lead pistol bullets fir a plinking load with Trailboss. But it really began to shine on the plinking from with an RCBS 180gn cast bullet at .359", that micro groove barrel loves them to 100yds for paper. I don't envisage hunting with it...
    “Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.” Sir Winston Churchill
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,301 Senior Member
    Here is mine,
    002-3_zps6b7f25e3.jpg
    whats not to love about a lever gun. never hunted with it so no terminal report to offer but it's a good shooter and notice, no scope:tooth:

    Sako
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    A couple of years ago, I called Remington to ask about the .35 Rem bullets, 200 gr. (or whatever, forgot.) Anyway, Remington did not have a single box of bullets for sale. These are the bullets my buddy wanted. Those who have plenty of them should be stingy with them.

    I had a TC Encore in .35 back when they were widely available. Great round.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    As to a chain fire, Gun Digest (I believe) in 2002 did an article on the safety of tubular magazines. They concluded, through tests, that with a spitzer bullet (lead tipped, not FMJ) in a tube mag, it is possible, though unlikely, to get detonation inside the tube, but it was difficult to do so. Only when the tip was deformed to the bullet jacket did they get a tube fire. What surprised me but shouldn't have, now that I think of it, is the results of a tube fire...unless it's contained by the chamber, a chain fire is very unlikely. Here is the link:

    http://retro.co.za/gundex/articles/Tubular%20Magazines%20are%20Safe.html
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Condoms are "safe", too- - - - -until they're not. I'll err on the side of caution. Anybody else who wants to take the risk is welcome to make their own decisions!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    No one advocates using spitzer bullets in a tube magazine. If you read the article it's mostly an academic study. I use flat point bullets or RN in my lever guns.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,944 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Midway has brass, but it's e$$pensive!

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/1311375414/norma-usa-reloading-brass-35-whelen?cm_vc=ProductFinding

    Glad I've got plenty!

    Jerry

    Think you'll have a hard time feeding that brass into a Marlin 336 chambered in .35 Remington. The brass you linked is for the .35 Whelen.

    :-)
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    Yeah, they .35 Rem is out of stock, no backorder.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    OOPS! Isn't that why they make a B F H ?
    :tooth:
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,944 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    OOPS! Isn't that why they make a B F H ?
    :tooth:
    Jerry

    Hey, use enough force...........you can chamber anything.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,944 Senior Member
    :yikes:
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,958 Senior Member
    I don't shoot any pointy bullets except Hornady Flex Tips which is what they load in the Leverrevolution Ammo in my tubular lever guns. True, a detonation is probably rare, and maybe non existent, but why push your luck? This is about as brilliant as shooting 3 inch shells in a 12 ga. with a 2 3/4 inch chamber. Stick with what it's designed for.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    It's more likely with a rimless cartridge than with a rimmed cartridge where the point off-sets with the primer because of the rim.

    And I wouldn't shoot pointy bullets in a tube fire rifle, not even the Leverevolution. I don't think you pick up enough ballistic advantage and pay a lot more for it.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • stepmacstepmac Member Posts: 172 Member
    Mine is an early 50's rifle and beautiful. That .35 Rem round on paper looks about like a 30/30 but in use it seems to hit a lot harder. I bought a hundred cases and a load of jacketed bullets and I'll have enough ammo for my lifetime. I shoot it off of the open sights. It is a 150 yrd rifle, but most game is shot at something like 75. The action of those first 336's are smooth has wavy lines engraved on the top of the receiver. It is a tad heavy, but it has a sling, so no biggie. Great pig gun.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,958 Senior Member
    With a 200 grain flat nose bullet it is a damn great pig gun and I've never shot one. But just looking at it's ballistics even on paper I will go out on a limb and say there isn't much better for deer and hogs within 150 yards. In fact I wouldn't turn down a 200 yard shot if I had one with some Lever Revolution Spitzer bullets in it. I've already posted here about the pointy bullets, but with the Flex Tip bullets they're safe and you just can't say enough about a great cartridge in a great rifle. That's classic in my book.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,229 Senior Member
    I got the buttstock sanded down to remove the 'tooth marks' from the climbing tree stand the guy was using when carrying the rifle. Stock is smooth, stained, ready for buffing, and then a good coat of carnuba wax. I hope to get the buttstock remounted tomorrow. I mounted a Williams receiver sight on it, and a matching higher red fire sight on front. The rifle wasn't shot much, but it wasn't cared for, either. Been a work in progress for a while. I'm getting it finished just in time for gun season.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,958 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    It's more likely with a rimless cartridge than with a rimmed cartridge where the point off-sets with the primer because of the rim.

    And I wouldn't shoot pointy bullets in a tube fire rifle, not even the Leverevolution. I don't think you pick up enough ballistic advantage and pay a lot more for it.

    Not me, I hand load them. The flex tip really aren't anymore expensive than any other quality bullet.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,229 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Would love to see pics of your handy work.

    I should have it back together by tomorrow afternoon. It looks pretty darned good for a $160 rifle!

    'Nother thing I had to repair. The ithering blidiot that previously owned it tried his hand at putting in a sling swivel in the buttstock. I had to fill in THREE HOLES, all off center, and then properly drill a hole for a sling swivel. Some people should be prohibited from using power tools of any kind.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,375 Senior Member
    A favorite and maligned practice (on the Marlin Owners Board) is drilling the sling swivel hole through the bullseye. The proper place is in front of the bullseye by about an inch or so toward the lever. Very few folks do this, though, unless they're members of the MOB.

    Visit there, it's a world in its own. Both of mine had been drilled through the bullseye. I replaced the bullseye on one and now I'm happy. Another thing is the JM stamp, which means almost nothing except to those on the MOB. Older hands pretty much ignore this, but it's a point worth a little bit on a trade.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,824 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    A favorite and maligned practice (on the Marlin Owners Board) is drilling the sling swivel hole through the bullseye. The proper place is in front of the bullseye by about an inch or so toward the lever. Very few folks do this, though, unless they're members of the MOB.

    Visit there, it's a world in its own. Both of mine had been drilled through the bullseye. I replaced the bullseye on one and now I'm happy. Another thing is the JM stamp, which means almost nothing except to those on the MOB. Older hands pretty much ignore this, but it's a point worth a little bit on a trade.

    I have been hanging out at the Marlin Owners Board over the past few months and it is a great group and really well informed.

    Since I am wading into the Marlin collecting waters, and recently purchased a Rem-lin 45-70 in stainless vs a JM marked gun built in 2008, I see substantial differences. I took the lever out of the Rem-lin and one side is only partially finished that is inside the gun. I assume this is a "doesn't matter" area. The wood is not nearly as nice, and the metal finished edges are not as eased as the other guns. It shoots well, the Rem-Lin has a 6.5 lb trigger, the Marlin a 5 lb trigger.

    I would prefer a JM marked gun based on this experience.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,824 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Would love to see pics of your handy work.

    Ditto!!!

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
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