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“Negligent Suicide” with a .500 Smith & Wesson revolver

Big ChiefBig Chief Senior MemberPosts: 32,995 Senior Member
From link in Nomadac's thread I clicked on.

The skinny little girl with the DE is lucky, the one in the story is not.

Why do these dolts insist on giving inexperienced people guns to shoot that have lot of recoil which if not controlled properly can lead to a disaster with injuries and death.

You see it all the time on YouTube, letting the uninitiated shoot a shotgun, rifle or handgun while they film it and laugh. If nothing else, it surely would discourage novice shooters from taking up the sport.

Bad Ju Ju, as they say. :nono::nono:

http://bearingarms.com/negligent-suicide-with-a-500-smith-wesson-revolver/
It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!

Replies

  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,392 Senior Member
    The T-shirt that clown is wearing in the video shows his mentality...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,624 Senior Member
    Not suicide, as suicide requires intent to kill one's self. Negligent homicide on the guy who furnished the gun. IMO.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Because I normally shoot .45 acp, and really don't have a small caliber (.22lr) handgun for a friend to learn with, I'm extra careful about coaching on the recoil. I'll take an unloaded pistol and have the gal-pal hold it, then I'll put my hands over hers and rock the pistol back a bit, simulating the recoil. Of course it's not identical but it at least lets the person understand that the recoil will be up and back, and rather sharp. Then I'll shoot the pistol first, letting her see the recoil and how to control it.

    And with those cautions and instruction, my friends have never been bonked on the nose or otherwise had difficulty. Yeah, a .45 kicks, but if the person knows about what to expect, the gun can be handled reasonably well. Main thing is knowing approximately what to expect.

    Newbies will either lean back or lean forward. Doing this slightly is no biggie, but it's better of course for the shooter to stand evenly on both feet and not lean. What is important is that the shooter be somewhat prepared. It's idiotic to stick a powerful gun into an untrained person's hands, of course.

    My female (mostly female) friends have been okay with firing my .45s, and if you approach it with a smart plan, the newbie will enjoy the "big bang".

    It's a falsehood that women (especially those who have very little experience shooting) will be turned off if shooting guns. I think that they enjoy the power and confidence that having a gun provides.

    My former girlfriend, and this is a TRUE southern gal, when I asked her what she wanted for Valentine's Day, she said, "A gun" So we went to the LGS and they were very patient and showed her all sorts of pistols. She settled on a nice Kahr P9 (9mm) single stack. She really likes the gun, and is a fair shot with it. I got her a few boxes of standard "whitebox" practice ammo and a couple boxes of CorBon PowrBall for her SD loads. We shot both and went through a detailed cleaning process. I of course bought her all the supplies and she's proud of that little pistol.

    I think that women find power and confidence in a gun. Sure, there are some totally anti-gun gals, but most are amenable to shooting, and get a real kick (mentally) from that "equalizer".

    A decent size 9mm is an excellent pistol for most women. It's a "real" caliber (good for SD) and relatively inexpensive to shoot, ammo always available.

    Btw, my former gf also has a little .380 that I bought her, but she now prefers the 9mm. She joked tha the .380 was just a "toy" by comparison. Ah, those southern gals!

    Anyway, sidebar rant concluded. And idiots who stick huge weapons into unsuspecting hands should be prosecuted and fined lotsa dough. Maybe a week in jail as a hint.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,288 Senior Member
    Getting a second unintended shot off with a heavy recoiling revolver or semiauto by someone not accustomed to the recoil isn't uncommon, and even someone accustomed to a heavy recoil pistol can be surprised even knowing that the pistol is going to be a handful. As the firearm is recoiling backwards and rotating the natural reaction is to grip tighter to regain control. Problem with that is that the trigger finger is on the trigger, and it takes a tighter grip, too. And that second unintended shot is the result.

    A couple of kids who shouldn't have been shooting a SMG were killed, and one instructor coaching a kid. Same kind of thing; crank down on the grip to control the recoil and the gun continues to fire because the trigger finger tightened down, too. It also happens with hard recoiling semiauto rifles. Range roofs with holes in the roof are pretty common.

    Gene is right on the negligent homicide charge.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    When Drew and I went shooting he really wasn't a fan of big bore revolvers. He did try the .500 he didn't really like it but these were factory mild loads. I told him he had to try wayne's loads and pretty much goaded him in to trying them. Well the results were a double tap with a 1/2" hole in the roof. You couldn't really distinguish the double tap it was one long explosion that was just wrong. We laughed about it later but it scared the hell out of him and me. I learned a valuable lesson that day.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Gene is right on the negligent homicide charge.

    Agreed.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,535 Senior Member
    Even though some of his videos are pretty tool-ish, IraqVeteran8888 on YouTube has a video response to that woman's death in their "Gun Gripes" series titled Range Jerks or something like that and they do a great job of admonishing the chauvinistic d-bags that convince small women and inexperienced shooters into shooting these huge revolvers.

    Whoever talked her into shooting that thing should be under review by the local DA for culpability in her death.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • SlanteyedshootistSlanteyedshootist Senior Member Posts: 3,947 Senior Member
    When I take new people to the range I always stand to one side and have one hand behind their back and one up and to one side of the gun ready to grab if they rise. Doesn't matter to me if they are young or old, male or female, big or small. If they don't like it, they can sit in the corner and watch everyone else. At our annual machine gun shoot, we have a lot of new people shooting guns for the first time. We Range Officers are always right there, often surrounding the shooter and ready to control the firearm. We have had NO injuries in 25 years. Anyone who doesn't want to comply with our rules and actions doesn't shoot.
    The answer to 1984 is 1776
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,624 Senior Member
    We Range Officers are always right there, often surrounding the shooter and ready to control the firearm.

    Make sure you leave a little room in front.:rotflmao:
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,392 Senior Member
    If I were to shoot something like a .500, I'd want a single round in the gun the first time. Maybe even the second and third. Ya don't know what its really like until you do it - nothing wrong with one round at a time for a bit.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,288 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    If I were to shoot something like a .500, I'd want a single round in the gun the first time. Maybe even the second and third. Ya don't know what its really like until you do it - nothing wrong with one round at a time for a bit.

    With a revolver, nothing wrong with loading every other chamber. Harder to 'double clutch' with an empty chamber as the next one up.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    That's what I do now.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,392 Senior Member
    That makes sense.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • SlanteyedshootistSlanteyedshootist Senior Member Posts: 3,947 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    We Range Officers are always right there, often surrounding the shooter and ready to control the firearm.

    Make sure you leave a little room in front.:rotflmao:

    Ah so, that explains why my hair is parted in the middle.
    The answer to 1984 is 1776
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