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Motorcycle Carry

topguntopgun MemberPosts: 128 Member
I'm right-handed, and when I ride I have my holster at about an 11 o'clock position. This cross-draw seems to be quicker and uses a little less shoulder movement during the draw when I'm on the bike. If I just button the bottom one or two buttons on my shirt, it's still fairly accessible and it keeps the shirt from blowing up and exposing the weapon when I'm moving.

Does anyone else do this, or am I the only one?

Replies

  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,398 Senior Member
    I have seen this on MC boards.

    Drawing on a MC while riding, cute in movies.

    First, if you are not riding a 42 Indian, then to draw you not only have to give up control, you have to let go of the throttle. If you can let go of the throttle, and give up control, you are not really in fear for your life making anything you do at that point questionable.

    Second, if you plan of shooting at a cage, after you have given up control and are in negative acceleration, he can run you over when you present the firearm. A F250 is a slow bullet, however it weighs around 42 million grains and is controled. It is also MUCH more stable platform if the cager is armed.

    Third, have you ever fired from a moving anything?

    Now if you are figuring on being stopped, carry wherever you can reach it. Mine is in my jacket inside pocket. On the road, that round thing in your right hand is your friend.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    [QUOTE=Varmintmist;396254 Third, have you ever fired from a moving anything?

    Yes, from a truck, and off a horse, good luck trying that on a MC. I carry it in my saddle bag or " T " bag.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Interesting question, topgun...

    It's been years since I owned a bike but while riding and carrying a pistol, I never considered having to draw and fire while in motion, for the aforementioned reasons. So I kept the pistol (a small .380) in a small carry-bag that strapped to the gas tank.

    How I put stuff on the bike: I had regular saddlebags that would snap on and off with those squeeze-clips, you know the type. The harness stayed on the bike and you could unsnap and remove the saddlebags easily. I'd not always have the saddlebags in use, since it was only if I were headed away for a weekend or whatever that I needed the extra luggage.

    Then I had a pair of small tote bags that would snap/unsnap to a harness around the gas tank. That's where I'd keep smaller stuff, including the pistol.

    I never considered trying to access the gun while moving. It would have been just too awkward. If I were being threatened while actually riding, I had a blazingly fast, souped up Kawi Ninja 750 under me that could outrun most anything on the road. So speed was my "protection" while moving.

    But when stopped, the pistol was easily accessed and it was held ready by a small inner "harness/holster" inside the bag. I could quickly unzip the bag and pull out the gun if necessary. I never considered a shoulder rig or any other sort of access while moving -- way too much movement to compensate for and still stay upright, especially if trying to outmaneuver the bad guys.
  • topguntopgun Member Posts: 128 Member
    I have seen this on MC boards.

    Drawing on a MC while riding, cute in movies.

    First, if you are not riding a 42 Indian, then to draw you not only have to give up control, you have to let go of the throttle. If you can let go of the throttle, and give up control, you are not really in fear for your life making anything you do at that point questionable.

    Second, if you plan of shooting at a cage, after you have given up control and are in negative acceleration, he can run you over when you present the firearm. A F250 is a slow bullet, however it weighs around 42 million grains and is controled. It is also MUCH more stable platform if the cager is armed.

    Third, have you ever fired from a moving anything?

    Now if you are figuring on being stopped, carry wherever you can reach it. Mine is in my jacket inside pocket. On the road, that round thing in your right hand is your friend.

    Sorry, I guess I should have been a little more clear. I have no intention of drawing while in motion unless my life would absolutely depend on it, and for exactly the reasons that you point out. What I'm talking about is while stopped, and sitting on the bike. It could be at a red light, in a parking lot, gas station, etc. I don't like the idea of having it tucked away on the bike. I want it on my hip at all times for when I need to leave the bike and go inside a business. Having it stashed on the bike would mean transferring it from the bike to my belt in public.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    When I'm on the bike I carry in my usual spot, IWB over my right kidney. It's comfortable there, and easily accessible when I'm stopped, either on or off the seat. Part of the road rash from my crash back in May was on the right handgrip of my P-64.
    Jerry
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Question for you Bikers. Are the saddlebags/compartments and bags you carry out an strap on a motorcycle considered the same as a vehicles glove box/console as far as firearms are concerned?

    Like some states say it is legal to have a gun in your vehicle, not on your person, but it must be in the console or someplace without a CCW. With you can do either.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Question for you Bikers. Are the saddlebags/compartments and bags you carry out an strap on a motorcycle considered the same as a vehicles glove box/console as far as firearms are concerned?

    Like some states say it is legal to have a gun in your vehicle, not on your person, but it must be in the console or someplace without a CCW. With you can do either.

    Excellent question. In Texas, the original CHL law was clarified so that someone riding a bike could carry concealed w. the gun either in a holster on the person or in a carrier on the bike. In other words, the bike, despite its being "open" is defined the same as if you were inside a car or truck.

    Therefore, even without a CHL permit, carrying your gun in a tote bag attached to the bike is okay in Texas.
    But each state of course will have its own thing, so checking first is best.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    have you ever fired from a moving anything?

    I actually practice shooting from a moving bicycle and a boat in a safe area.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    I actually practice shooting from a moving bicycle and a boat in a safe area.

    Naturally, we can only imagine the consequences of such practice and yearn for the youtube video... "NN riding and drawing the pistol... NN aiming... NN firin--- and NN goes into the lake!"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,738 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    I actually practice shooting from a moving bicycle and a boat in a safe area.

    I practice from roller blades and a skate board.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • gatorgator Senior Member Posts: 1,746 Senior Member
    When on the bike I carry in my normal position (strong side 4:00) I also carry a Bond Arms .45 colt in my vest pocket.

    If I'm in a bad situation I can get to the little Bond derringer (after stopped) much quicker than I can pull up my vest and get to my regular carry gun.........after the first two shots I will switch guns.....if needed.
    USMC 80-84
    -96 lbs
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I've considered carrying in a cross-draw rig so I can draw lefthanded wile still maintaining throttle and directional control with my right hand, but it would take a LOT of practice before I'd be even remotely comfortable with my accuracy in a situation like that. Plenty of horsepower, both hands on the bars, and some evasive action would seem to be a lot better defensive move.
    Jerry
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    I practice from roller blades and a skate board.
    We used to shoot at 400 knots, too.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,738 Senior Member
    I practice shooting at knots, too. Those tiny suckers are hard to hit! Got to have plenty of trees, though. I suppose if you've got 400 to shoot at, you're surrounded by trees.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Dang, I can't shoot that fast.... 460.312 MPH :guns:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I guess the older you get, those humorous bones get osteoporosis, hence the funny bone is less funny.... Dullsville extremis.....
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • Fat BillyFat Billy Senior Member Posts: 1,813 Senior Member
    Shoulder holster on the rt side to maintain throttle control. Practice weak hand shooting. :cool2: Later,
    Fat Billy

    Recoil is how you know primer ignition is complete.
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,670 Senior Member
    How about this? I use a Sneaky Pete holster for my compact S&W 9 on my bike. You can wear it with your t-shirt flying in the breeze and no one will know the difference. It is easy to access the pistol with your right hand, but as others have said if you're on a bike and take your right hand off the throttle you lose speed control. My solution is I have a rubber O-ring in between the throttle and the brake housing that acts as a throttle lock, but there are several brands of after-market locks available, which will allow the rider to at least maintain the same speed while you reach for the pistol. If you don't want to use a throttle lock for that, in an emergency you can actually use your left hand to grip the throttle and steer at the same time. It takes a little getting used to, but I have done this while riding and it's not all that hard.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,203 Senior Member
    On my right hip in a belt slide holster, or a IWB.

    Depends on temperature, weather, and what I'm wearing.

    I wear a textile M/C jacket in the summer. A shirt with the tail out, i.e. a cabana, panama, Hawaii print, or a Tac-Ti-Kool type shirts. Jacket keeps the shirt tail down and the piece covered sufficiently.

    Considered getting a pocket pistol of some strip (S&W Shield, Ruger LC-9, Remington 51), but will keep the holster in the same position.

    I like knowing my weapon is in the same spot all the time.

    I have thought numerous times "I couldn't get that thing into play if my life depended on it."

    As Clint Smith said once upon a time, "either Drive or Fight, Don't try to do both"
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
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