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Old time ammo..

Ranch13Ranch13 Senior MemberPosts: 820 Senior Member
Have a batch of rounds loaded with paper patch to test for accuracy and creedmoor and midrange matches.
The 45-90's are loaded with a .446 diameter (before patching) 525 gr money bullet from a Buffalo Arms mould.
The 44-90 st. is loaded with a copy of an original sharps bullet. It' is dual diameter, being .436 on the base, and then tapering into a .429 is nose.
Both rounds are loaded with 2 different widths of patches, many times the narrower patch will shoot to 1000 yds with less elevation on the sight staff.
Both are loaded with Olde Eysnford 1.5 blackpowder, which has proven to be a very accurate powder delivering high (for black) velocity and very manageable fouling. Just need the weather to cooperate a bit.

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Replies

  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,711 Senior Member
    Look good
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,916 Senior Member
    :up: Anxiously awaiting range report..... :popcorn:
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Had never heard of Olde Eysnford black powder and immediately pulled it up to see what I had possibly been missing and guess what.....says GOEX 3f powder! So, went straight to my GOEX cans and searched all over for "Olde Eysnford" but find nothing! Is this a special grade of "competition" powder? I don't shoot competition any longer, but would like to know so please bring me up to date.
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    Both are loaded with Olde Eysnford 1.5 blackpowder

    The 1.5 relate to coarseness of the powder grain ?

    Any chance of video.....I do remember pictures you had posted from years ago
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Had never heard of Olde Eysnford black powder and immediately pulled it up to see what I had possibly been missing and guess what.....says GOEX 3f powder! So, went straight to my GOEX cans and searched all over for "Olde Eysnford" but find nothing! Is this a special grade of "competition" powder? I don't shoot competition any longer, but would like to know so please bring me up to date.
    Olde Eynsford is a product of Goex. It comes in 1.5,2 and 3f. If you go to Goex's web page there's a brief explanation of it. You can also see a description of it on Powder Inc's web page. It's been out about 3 years now.
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Weatherby wrote: »
    Both are loaded with Olde Eysnford 1.5 blackpowder

    The 1.5 relate to coarseness of the powder grain ?

    Any chance of video.....I do remember pictures you had posted from years ago

    Yes 1.5 is the coarsest. I don't know if I'll be able to get a video or not, but I've been trying to figure out how to get a video of the bullets impacting the target. I think folks will be amazed at what happens when those big ol lead birds slam into steel even at 1000 yds.
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Jayhawker, I am anxiously awaiting some decent weather to trot these out... :cool2:
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,450 Senior Member
    Looks good buddy! Can't wait.
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,916 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Jayhawker, I am anxiously awaiting some decent weather to trot these out... :cool2:

    In that case, I'll look for your post in say.........July...:tooth:
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Oh now it ain't that bad.. why just the other day I had the Raton gun out, and gave it a work out at 8,900 and 1000 with grease groove bullets. the 459535m3 Buffalo Arms mould..
    001_zps5c8cad71.jpg
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Finally got to run those paper patched loads. Nothing really exceptional, but certainly need some follow up with some tweeking on the loads.
    First up was the CPA , loaded with the BACO .446 money bullets,800 yds. Took a few more rounds than I had hoped to get the elevation, and the wind was a bit of a trickster, but it's not bad.
    003_zps9dh5e4fh.jpg
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Then on to the C Sharps 75, with it's heavy contour 44-90 st barrel from Oregon Barrel works. Shooting a new copy of an original Sharps dual diameter bullet at 600 yds, there's some promise with it wiping between shots. The big disappointment is it's not going to shoot dirty.. After we painted the target and were picking up the "dimes" I noticed a nice 3 shot cluster in a railroad tie under the target.. We'll get back to this sometime before the shooting season is in full swing...
    008_zpsbnwvurqn.jpg
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,916 Senior Member
    Interesting...those old thumpers never cease to amaze.....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,730 Senior Member
    Why paper-patched? I've often wondered if there's an advantage over outerlubed lubed bullets. They sure look cool. But is or what is the advantage.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Dr. dbDr. db Senior Member Posts: 1,541 Senior Member
    Because Quigley and and Quigley and they're cool and Quigley!
  • HvyMaxHvyMax Senior Member Posts: 1,786 Senior Member
    Paper patching doesn't grease the bullets up which would foul the powder when stored in cartridges.
    Wal Mart where the discriminating white trash shop.
    Paddle faster!!! I hear banjos.
    Reason for editing: correcting my auto correct
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,395 Senior Member
    My theory - and I've never actually read if this is true - is that bullets with grease grooves filled with lube tend to shed some of that lube while spinning. Sometimes, that shedding may not be uniform. On a pistol bullet at 50 yards or 100 yards, this may not make much of a difference. On a rifle bullet reaching out to 800 and 1000 yards, there might be some upset if half the lube is spun off from one side and the other half remains in place a few 100ths of a second longer.

    Like I said, it's only my theory.
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    Why paper-patched? I've often wondered if there's an advantage over outerlubed lubed bullets. They sure look cool. But is or what is the advantage.

    Mostly because that's the way it was originally done, except for the US Military rifle cartridges.
    Paper patching is more of a challenge than greasers, but that is mostly due to the change in chamber leeds that came along after smokeless powder and jacketed bullets became all the rage. The leeds common in the pre smokeless days were often something under 20*, think the 22 lr chamber, after smokeless and jacketed became the norm, the leed changed to a 45*, and the chamber tolerances were increased to allow for the greater expantion of the case due to the higher pressure of smokeless.
    Accuracy wise it's quicker and easier to get a greaser to shoot than a paper patch. Paper patch is much more dependant on proper fouling control than the greasers. Paper patch does have the advantage of using less elevation on the sight staff and less windage than a similar grease groove bullet, especially at distance.
    One other thing that is sort of over looked with these things, is at close range, say under 300 yds, there's a lot of stuff that goes unnoticed, but when you get out to the end of midrange and start into the long range things can really start adding up. Bullet stability is a big one. Lots of times a bullet that groups well at 300, may do alright at 6, but fall into complete instability by 800. You can also get a killer load at 800 that won't make it to 1000 with anything close to repeatable poi. And you can also get a bullet that is on the verge of loosing stability that while it will shoot to 1000 in calm conditions will go nuts on you in a 10+ mph wind..
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,730 Senior Member
    Two questions: what does the 45* stand for when talking about leade? Second, if you're using less windage and elevation, that would seem to indicate a higher velocity. Is that true?

    I tried loading PP bullets for my 45-70, found a template on line, but I think I had the wrong bullet for patching or something. I can't remember and while I "tried" I never accomplished the task.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • HvyMaxHvyMax Senior Member Posts: 1,786 Senior Member
    Pretty sure he was going for °. The angle leading into the rifling. Too steep would probably strip the paper.
    Wal Mart where the discriminating white trash shop.
    Paddle faster!!! I hear banjos.
    Reason for editing: correcting my auto correct
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    Two questions: what does the 45* stand for when talking about leade? Second, if you're using less windage and elevation, that would seem to indicate a higher velocity. Is that true?

    I tried loading PP bullets for my 45-70, found a template on line, but I think I had the wrong bullet for patching or something. I can't remember and while I "tried" I never accomplished the task.

    Degree... If you look at a current saami spec chamber drawing you'll see the steep angle to the rifling, prior to smokeless it was much gentler. 22 chambers have not changed so if you see a drawing on those you'll get a good idea.
    Using the correct diameter of slick and a good paper goes along way to helping get things to going. Fouling control is really important.
    The paper patch slicks don't have the air drag like a grease groove bullet does , so while the velocity is similar the less drag and usually higher bc on a slick will slice thru the wind better.
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