8mm Mauser identification

BcgothBcgoth New MemberPosts: 4 New Member
Hoping someone can help me with identifying an 8mm mauser I have. Its been in the family for over 40 years and I may have been purchased from a gun smith who was a WWII vet. I can't find any identifying marks on it that help me determine its origin. There are no import stamps or caliber designating stamps on the receiver. There are random stamps on the bottom of the receiver that appear to be from the workers that put the rifle together. There are also several stamps on the barrel but I cannot correlate those stamps to anything. I'd like to know the origin of the rifle if possible and make sure we shoot the correct ammo through it. Any help would be appreciated.

Here are the pictures of the barrel stamps.

Replies

  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,939 Senior Member
    Welcome aboard
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,796 Senior Member
    That stamp is a waffenamt...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waffenamt

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • BcgothBcgoth New Member Posts: 4 New Member
    thanks
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,957 Senior Member
    Looks like it's had all the original markings removed. That was common practice for a lot of importers at one time. National crests were ground off along with other markings.

    Best bet on finding what cartridge it is chambered for is to do a Cerrosafe chamber casting. Easy to do and a gunsmith can then measure to determine the chambering. Many military rifles lacked chambering(cartridge) designations stamped on them as they weren't deemed necessary.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • BcgothBcgoth New Member Posts: 4 New Member
    I can take some more pics and post them tomorrow.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,145 Senior Member
    At first guess, I'd say it's a bring-back from WW 2. And definitely get a chamber cast to see if it's an 8mm, which it probably is since that's apparently a German army barrel. Unless my eyes deceive me.

    The 8mm is a very good round. I've got one, and except for it being a kicker, it's a beautiful and fine rifle.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Dunno, I always liked 8mm as not having much recoil to speak of.
    More bark than bite I always said.......
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,145 Senior Member
    If you buy American commercial ammo, it's mild. Liability being what it is and rifles being possibly older than 100 years, over here they load down. Try Norma, though. It's much hotter loaded for European standards. And if you get surplus ammo, it's 150 gr. at about 2800 fps, which is what I'm shooting now.

    My 8mm weighs slightly less than 7 pounds and recoil is fierce, has a receiver sight. Williams? Lyman? Whatever the "deer in the circle" sight is? I'm recoil sensitive, which I am. Mine has a hard horn buttplate and a skinny stock. Beautiful rifle, got a rib on it and I'm fairly certain it's a WW 2 bringback.

    I'm loading down for it like a 30-30 when I reload for it.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    That sounds wise, I always liked a rifle with some bite, that Norma having more recoil or bite, it would bite thrice, once from the shoulder, twice on the wallet !
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,338 Senior Member
    You most likely have a WW II souvenir that's been sporterized. The barrel shape suggests it might be an 8MM Mauser, but without seeing the rest of the receiver, there are other possibilities. How about a few pics of the bolt, and the front and the rear of the receiver to see if you have a large ring or small ring type. Most of the small ring actions were chambered in lower-powered and smaller bore cartridges than the 8MM. Cerrosafe will give you the most accurate chamber casting, but candle wax or parrafin will be sufficient to get an idea of the cartridge shape and bore size. Get the headspace checked by a good gunsmith before you purchase ammo or try to shoot it. Unless it's a high end custom job by a world famous smith, sporterizing a military rifle just about destroys any collector's value it might have had.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,145 Senior Member
    With the Nazi eagle on the barrel, it's almost certainly a WW 2 K98k, a large ring 8mm Mauser. But by all means, get the headspace and chamber dimensions checked. If it was in any other caliber, it wouldn't have the Nazi barrel.

    I got a 30-06 very nice WW 2 gun, marked some sort of odd metric number. Maybe between the wars. I was pretty sure it was an 06, but had to cerrosafe the chamber to determine the exact round for it.

    At the time this rifle was probably sporterized, 98Ks were a dime a dozen. Assuming the headspace is good, its value is a shooter. Those German gunsmiths were talented and needed the work (and food.) I'm a big fan of these rifles, I have three. A comparable smith-ed rifle today on a 98 Mauser action, depending on the work done, would run you a few thousand dollars.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,832 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    If you buy American commercial ammo, it's mild. Liability being what it is and rifles being possibly older than 100 years, over here they load down. Try Norma, though. It's much hotter loaded for European standards. And if you get surplus ammo, it's 150 gr. at about 2800 fps, which is what I'm shooting now.

    My 8mm weighs slightly less than 7 pounds and recoil is fierce, has a receiver sight. Williams? Lyman? Whatever the "deer in the circle" sight is? I'm recoil sensitive, which I am. Mine has a hard horn buttplate and a skinny stock. Beautiful rifle, got a rib on it and I'm fairly certain it's a WW 2 bringback.

    I'm loading down for it like a 30-30 when I reload for it.

    I load a 150 grain bullet over 55 grains of BLC-2 for 2950 FPS in my Yugo Mauser sporter. That load was worked up for that one rifle. I don't shoot that in the two I have that I haven't sporterized because the load wasn't worked up in those rifles. I shoot Wolf Gold with 196 grain Spitzer soft point bullets in those and I've chronied them at 2500 and some change. But they're ok accurate and I think they should be a good deer or hog bullet. My Yugo Sporter doesn't kick bad at all with any of them. Damn I love that rifle. It's smooth and accurate. I love the stock I put on it, a Boyd's Classic Pepper Laminate finished in polyurethane and looks great. It's still got the Mil Surp stepped down 8mm barrel, but it's a shooter.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,145 Senior Member
    My 8mm has an old-style Mauser stock with the panels on the side and is pinned to the barrel with a wedge. Stock is light-colored walnut. I guess you'd call it a "walking-around" rifle, as it's lightweight. In no situation I know would I ever put a 196 gr. bullet in that thing!

    I'm looking at around 2100 fps with a 150 gr. bullet.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,329 Senior Member
    Chamber cast or at least a gunsmith check is a "must". If formerly a German military issue rifle (Gewher 98, K98k or any of their variants), caliber should be 8mm. Mauser or it's metric equivalent: 7.92x57mm. After WWII some of them were reworked to fit a "custom" cartridge called "8mm-06", that is an American 30-06 case fitted with a .319 (8mm.) bullet.

    Other potential military Mauser calibers could have been 7mm Mauser or 7.65x53mm Argentinian Mauser, so better be safe than sorry.

    8mm. Mauser is available from assorted commercial brands (Winchester, Remington, Prvi Partizan, Sellier & Bellot, etc.) in FMJ and hunting bullets, and also surplus military ammo. Be careful with the latter since it can be using corrosive primers that will need a different after-shooting cleaning procedure, and will be loaded to higher pressure than U.S. commercial rounds.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I remember seeing linked 8mm for use in the MG-42...
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • BcgothBcgoth New Member Posts: 4 New Member
    Here are some additional pictures. Thanks for all of the information!

  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,832 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    I remember seeing linked 8mm for use in the MG-42...


    Doc, I'm not sure but I think the MG-42 shot a shorter case round than an 8x57. It had a wickedly high rate of fire and I'm thinking it shot something like an 8x48 or some such shorter round that would cycle
    faster through the action.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,145 Senior Member
    No, the MG 42 was a full-house 7.9 x 57. I think you're talking about the Stg 44 which had a shorter case the first "assault rifle." It was a 8 x 33 round.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
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