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Gratuity for hunting guide

41magnut41magnut Senior MemberPosts: 1,276 Senior Member
SS3 and I are planning a hunt for '16.
Due to limited time, logistics, and so forth we have decided the use of an outfitter is the best course of action.

One question that has come up in conversations is, gratuity for the guide
suggested at 10%.

My question is 10% of what? Based on total charges of the outfitter that could be several hundred dollars.

I realize guiding hunters can be a "tough row to hoe" and I certainly want to fair and reasonable.

I know several of you have experience with guided hunts and would value you input.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
"The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:

Replies

  • Murphy's LawMurphy's Law Member Posts: 313 Member
    Never hired a hunting guide but for salmon fishing it all depends on the service. 10%'seems awful steep though, but I guess if one has the big bucks for guided hunts, then a 10% tip would be no problem. Again, I think it all just depends on the service. Most times, on private charter for salmon, we'll all pass the hat and leave a good tip that probably ends up being a bit more than 10%. It all depends on how much beer we drank and "jolly generous" we get by the time we get back to the launch. Ha-ha!
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    It all depends on the quality of the hunt. The guides I used in South Africa showed me an incredible time, threw in a bunch of non-advertised extras (free springhare/jackal/lynx hunts, free day of fishing on the Sundays River, among other things) and I took care of them accordingly. I gave them 10% of the package cost (which they shared). That was indeed a few hundred bucks, not including what I tipped the camp staffers (cook/maid/skinners). They completely earned it in my case. If they did a sub-par job or tried to pull a fast one, that would not have been the case.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,162 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    So, if I'm paying a guy to guide me, then I also have to give him a big tip?

    Yeah. No.

    Generally, you're paying the outfitter...room, lodging, meals, transportation, contracting a guide, etc, etc, etc....the guide gets a cut of what you paid the outfitter.... A guide who busts his ass for me deserves something extra...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,547 Senior Member
    Don't forget to tip the camp cook!! The guides, wranglers and cooks all work their butts off. Besides monetary tips, we had a guide that would also accept elk ivories and hides. He turned them into art and sold them on the side.
    10% of the cost of the guided hunt is about right!
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    I tipped my bear guide 50%. He charged me $600 for 3 days, let me stay for 4, then him and another guy stayed up until 4am skinning and quartering my bear. That, and because my knee was a wreck at the time, he called in a couple of guys to retrieve the bear so I didn't have to help carry him out. For the amount of services I got, the $900 I spent was a bargain.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    I tipped my bear guide 50%. He charged me $600 for 3 days, let me stay for 4, then him and another guy stayed up until 4am skinning and quartering my bear. That, and because my knee was a wreck at the time, he called in a couple of guys to retrieve the bear so I didn't have to help carry him out. For the amount of services I got, the $900 I spent was a bargain.
    You did the right thing. That guy assuredly deserved it.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,982 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    So, if I'm paying a guy to guide me, then I also have to give him a big tip?

    Yeah. No.

    Its like eating at a restaurant, you aren't paying the server for the food, you are paying the business. But the server is the one who facilitated putting food in your mouth, so you tip her based on a % of the total bill.

    I think it really depends on the type of hunt you are doing. If its a fully guided 10 day back country horse back elk hunt....the price is going to be much higher and I'd tip on the total amount. In Africa they break things down between daily rate and trophy fee, you tip on the DR, not the trophy fee added in.

    If this is something like a 1-2 day weekend pig hunt, I could see UP TO 50$ a day per person. If I'm hunting for 2 days on a 500$ 2-pig hunt, I think 100$ is appropriate.

    Need a bit more info on the hunt to figure this out (plus I just want to know what you two are up to!)
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,276 Senior Member
    Its like eating at a restaurant, you aren't paying the server for the food, you are paying the business. But the server is the one who facilitated putting food in your mouth, so you tip her based on a % of the total bill.

    I think it really depends on the type of hunt you are doing. If its a fully guided 10 day back country horse back elk hunt....the price is going to be much higher and I'd tip on the total amount. In Africa they break things down between daily rate and trophy fee, you tip on the DR, not the trophy fee added in.

    If this is something like a 1-2 day weekend pig hunt, I could see UP TO 50$ a day per person. If I'm hunting for 2 days on a 500$ 2-pig hunt, I think 100$ is appropriate.

    Need a bit more info on the hunt to figure this out (plus I just want to know what you two are up to!)
    It is a Pronghorn hunt either in Texas or New Mexico. Having never used a outfitter while involved a guide, excluding the Great SE Forum Pig Hunt of 2014, there are several questions that we (I) need answered before any monies change hands.

    It will not a full blown pack trip as much as I covet making a hunt like. Typical speed goat hunt, drive the area, spot a likekly candidate then put on a stalk.

    I have hunted at lodges, or ranches where you are taken to a blind, picked up for lunch and a nap then back to a blind for the afternoon. I tipped the hand who did the field dressing, but not the cook (owner's wife), or the owner/operator. Hunted with them 3 years, or so, they always seemed happy to have us back.

    Just trying to estimate the cost and avoid any unplanned expenses.

    Sent from my SM-T520 using Tapatalk
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    I have never hunted with a guide and right now in this time of my life I don't have the money for that. But my oldest son is a fishing guide and now he owns his own boat. He charters it out for from $600-1000 per trip and for 1 to 6 people it's the same price. You're basically paying my son for the fuel and use of his boat for a day. He throws in putting you on the fish or that's part of the usage fee. If the boat catches a lot of fish on the trip you tip the captain, My Son, accordingly. He doesn't keep any of that money but divvies it up among the crew. If it's a suck day of fishing you expect less to zero tips. If it's a good day, then people will tip accordingly. But whatever, my son doesn't keep any tips. His fee is in the boat.

    When my son was a deck hand with another company back in the 90s, the Captain got tipped too, because it wasn't his boat. The boat belonged to the company. So the captain was just another crew member in effect.

    I would say that if your guide just works for a company he should be tipped. If he IS the company, no. Tip the guys that work for him if they do a good job and you have an enjoyable hunt due to their service.

    I know some restaurants where the ownership-management takes a cut out of the tips. If I find this out, they don't get my business and I tell them why.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,982 Senior Member
    for a short goat hunt, I think 35-50$ per person per day to your guides is good. I think I gave my guide like 75$ for a 1 day goat hunt. Didn't shoot anything but that was my fault not his, he got me on animals and was happy to put the footwork in vs just driving.
  • WORLD TWORLD T Member Posts: 262 Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Generally, you're paying the outfitter...room, lodging, meals, transportation, contracting a guide, etc, etc, etc....the guide gets a cut of what you paid the outfitter.... A guide who busts his ass for me deserves something extra...

    I recently went on a guided deer hunt on a 7300 acre ranch. The tips were included in the package. I asked the owner and the guides about tips. They both said it was included in the package.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    41magnut wrote: »
    It is a Pronghorn hunt either in Texas or New Mexico.

    If you don't mind me asking, where in Texas would you hunt? The only places I know of with goat populations are the Trans-Pecos region (Alpine/Marfa/Ft. Davis) and the panhandle between Amarillo and Dalhart. I've only seen a few in the panhandle, and have been told by very reliable sources that there was a big disappearance of antelope in the Trans-Pecos region 10-12 years ago. Perhaps the population has rebounded, though. I don't know. I do know that I used to see them just north of Ft. Davis (toward Balmorhea), between Alpine and Ft. Davis, and between Ft. Davis and Marfa. There's probably other places they stay, but those are where I've seen them.

    As for New Mexico, the northeast corner between Raton and Clayton is lousy with them. I've counted as many as 300 from my car when driving through. I've also seen a lot between Clayton and Springer. Many years ago, there used to be a lot west of Roswell. I haven't been in that country since the late 1987, though, so I don't have any idea what the population is like now.

    You might also check Colorado. There is (or was) at least one Ranching for Wildlife operation in southeast Colorado that offered antelope hunts. I have no idea what they charge, but they can provide you with a tag as part of the price.

    Whichever way you go, I'd like to know. Please keep us informed. Chasing goats across the open prairie is about the most fun a man can have with his pants on.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,423 Senior Member
    There are some good herds east of El Paso going toward Carlsbad and around Dell City. Like most of Texas, it's private land. Knew a guy with a ranch near Dell City who used to get antelope tags. My dad shot one there, aamof. Not sure if he's still there or allowing hunts or not. He used to threaten to shoot them anyway cause they were getting in his gardens and tearing stuff up...
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,423 Senior Member
    And I have seen good populations of them further south. From Van Horn toward Marfa and Alpine. Haven't been through Balmorea, but have made quite a few trips through the Pecos area and haven't seen one. From what I've seen, seems to be south of I10 or near the New Mexico border where I've seen them most. Saw a couple hundred of them between Dell City and El Paso a few weeks ago.
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,276 Senior Member
    Western TX panhandle - Dalhart area - or eastern NM - Logan NM.
    There are some Pronghorn in Dickens, Borden, Lynne, Garza counties (southern plains off the caprock) but very limited numbers. Also huntable # near the Plains TX, Tatum NM. Lack of rainfall & general poor range condition in the Trans-Pecos region has lead to reduced numbers there, according to the TPW biologist I visited with.

    Due to time constraints of both our jobs I plan on keeping to the high plains of TX & NM. (5 hour range of home)

    While I detest the term, this is one of those "bucket list" hunts I want to do while I am still able - physically & fiscally .

    Of course I would be thankful for any advise - guides, locale, &/or equipment. My rifle decision has been made, can't or won't speak for SS3, but I'm thinking he may have made that decision as well.

    Outfitter fees are comparable, excluding the more high-end hunts, so the misc. expenses must be considered, and may well be the determinationing factor.

    NM nonresident license will be approximately $350-400. TX resident (bought every year anyway) $50. Land owner tags for TX hunt included in outfitter's charges.

    Planning is part of the adventure :cool:

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
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