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How Did Your Season End Up?

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  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Filled a tag. d63d4584b7ed3aab1e8130618d483e85.jpg


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    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • KSU FirefighterKSU Firefighter Senior Member Posts: 3,249 Senior Member
    Didn't fill a tag, spent quite a few evenings in the woods with my oldest daughter, total success!
    The fire service needs a "culture of extinguishment not safety" Ray McCormack FDNY
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Yes.
    I used these for some of the deer:

    "Managed Lands Deer (MLD) Permits: Permits issued to landowners with a TPWD-approved Wildlife Management Plan. MLD permits allow hunters, at the discretion of the landowner or agent, to exceed the county bag limit and (in some cases) to hunt during an extended season. All deer taken on a property for which MLD permits have been issued must be tagged with the appropriate type of MLD permit. NOTE: No license log entry or tag from a hunting license is required for deer killed under a MLD permit (see license log requirement above). For more information about Wildlife Management Plans, landowners should call TPWD at [URL="tel:(512) 389-4505"](512) 389-4505[/URL]."

    They won't give us those permits in this county
    well let me correct that
    in this PART of the county
    only in the north part

    We are allowed two doe. But they cut off does at the end of November.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Our regular rifle season ended today. But in the morning it's Muzzle Loading time. And we can still shoot hogs of course.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    FIFY
    What are these "tags" you speak of? :confused:

    I have a tag on the back bumper of my truck, but I don't see myself backing over every deer I kill, and I sure don't see myself running one down in reverse :nono:

    For you guys, it's more like you buy a license, and shoot a deer. That's it. No elk, moose, antelope, sheep, goats or anything else.

    Every coin has two sides.

    [ETA] Make that whitetail deer only. No mule deer or any other deer species, unless you hunt some exotic on a private game preserve.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,925 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I still don't know how you guys put up with that system.

    I like our "buy tag, shoot animal" system.

    We can still do that. 2nd and 3rd rifle bull tags are OTC. Buy em just about anywhere, sporting goods store, walmart, some gas stations, CDOW locations. Buy and hunt, good for like 75% of the state. Just can't do that for LIMITED stuff. You can buy leftover licenses after the draw too, look through the list, see whats left, buy tag, hunt. On those, usually a good reason there are leftover tags though, like all private land, or low numbers of game.

    I THINK there are still OTC archery tags as well, or there used to be for lots of areas. They got rid of the OTC general muzzleloader a few years ago.

    I personally hate hunting in the OTC seasons, WAY too many people. But, I always keep that as a backup. I can apply for and build points for a hard to get tag (high success area, prime rut time, trophy unit) and still just go buy a tag and hunt almost anywhere.

    Mule deer used to be OTC, but the populations have crashed a few times, to the point there were really not many deer left, at all. They don't populate like white tails do. Hell my home unit cut ALL deer tags for almost 10 years. Last year was the first time since the mid 90's they allowed a handful of doe tags.

    Moose...well, there are only a few thousand. But you have 15,000 people putting in for 45 tags. Draw is the only way to do that, same with bighorn and mountain goat. Desert sheep is a true lottery, IIRC, there are no points....you put in and get it or you don't. But that is a once in a lift time tag.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    We can still do that. 2nd and 3rd rifle bull tags are OTC. Buy em just about anywhere, sporting goods store, walmart, some gas stations, CDOW locations. Buy and hunt, good for like 75% of the state. Just can't do that for LIMITED stuff. You can buy leftover licenses after the draw too, look through the list, see whats left, buy tag, hunt. On those, usually a good reason there are leftover tags though, like all private land, or low numbers of game.

    I THINK there are still OTC archery tags as well, or there used to be for lots of areas. They got rid of the OTC general muzzleloader a few years ago.

    I personally hate hunting in the OTC seasons, WAY too many people. But, I always keep that as a backup. I can apply for and build points for a hard to get tag (high success area, prime rut time, trophy unit) and still just go buy a tag and hunt almost anywhere.

    Mule deer used to be OTC, but the populations have crashed a few times, to the point there were really not many deer left, at all. They don't populate like white tails do. Hell my home unit cut ALL deer tags for almost 10 years. Last year was the first time since the mid 90's they allowed a handful of doe tags.

    Moose...well, there are only a few thousand. But you have 15,000 people putting in for 45 tags. Draw is the only way to do that, same with bighorn and mountain goat. Desert sheep is a true lottery, IIRC, there are no points....you put in and get it or you don't. But that is a once in a lift time tag.

    In Texas we buy a license with tags attached. But depending on what county you're hunting in you may not can use all the tags attached to the license. Some counties are 2 deer, some 4 and some 5. Then there's those management tags like Zee gets. Here again, that can depend on the county. Some counties don't go by those management programs and some do. The one I'm in the north zone does but the south zone doesn't. I'm in the South Zone. We can kill two bucks and two does. But after November no does. This sucks. If it's warm in November the deer don't move well. So this year only 2 does were taken. At 2 does per person we should have gotten 8. If we could have shot does all season, we could have done much better because December has been much cooler than November was and I think we would have all gotten at least one doe.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    For you guys, it's more like you buy a license, and shoot a deer. That's it. No elk, moose, antelope, sheep, goats or anything else.

    Every coin has two sides.

    [ETA] Make that whitetail deer only. No mule deer or any other deer species, unless you hunt some exotic on a private game preserve.

    Jerry -

    You just highlighted one of the great conundrums I face going forward toward my military retirement. I love the West. There are so many game speciies to chase and hunt, and the fly fishing is second to nowhere else in the country. But then I have to look at it from the "how many good years do I have left" angle and realize that a whitetail state would let me hunt every year. Nebraska is probably the only non-western state where whitetails, mulie, elk, big horn sheep and antelope (the latter 3 to a much to a less extent) can be hunted, but not the quality or level you see in the true West. Sure, I can hunt whitetail deer annually without waiting for points to build, and the waterfowl and upland game hunting is superb, but like you said: two sides to every coin. Chasing mulies, elk and antelope on a semi-regular basis is incredibly appealing, too.

    Decisions, decisions...
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Jerry -

    You just highlighted one of the great conundrums I face going forward toward my military retirement. I love the West. There are so many game speciies to chase and hunt, and the fly fishing is second to nowhere else in the country. But then I have to look at it from the "how many good years do I have left" angle and realize that a whitetail state would let me hunt every year. Nebraska is probably the only non-western state where whitetails, mulie, elk, big horn sheep and antelope (the latter 3 to a much to a less extent) can be hunted, but not the quality or level you see in the true West. Sure, I can hunt whitetail deer annually without waiting for points to build, and the waterfowl and upland game hunting is superb, but like you said: two sides to every coin. Chasing mulies, elk and antelope on a semi-regular basis is incredibly appealing, too.

    Decisions, decisions...

    Aw, c'mon Luis. You're still young. You have plenty of time to take those western state trophies.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Aw, c'mon Luis. You're still young. You have plenty of time to take those western state trophies.

    Part of me wants to maintain the status quo and throw in a side-property on the other side of the country. That would be move to a whitetail state and continue putting in for non-resident points in several western states to help move along my western draw odds year to year. That way I can hunt every year no matter what, but still get the off-year opportunity to hunt out west. So far, I've done pretty decent rotating where I've been able to hunt doing that and only had one year off between antelope hunts.

    That said, The fishing (especially the fly fishing) in my part of Ohio, general sucks. I've caught the fly fishing bug bad, and the thought of killing time fishing highly productive, small mountain streams most of the year, or even all year in the years when I don't draw anything, is very, very appealing. I miss being able to make a few hour long drive into Utah and being able to hit a stretch of river where I never saw another human being for 12+ hours straight and catching 30+ trout per day. Then, I could buy a place out East and let some close buddies who live nearby hunt it in exchange for yearly scouting reports and trespass deterrence operations.

    The horrifying part of all of this is that I have only 6 years left to figure this all out! Once I crack 20, the goal is to buy a house and set up permanent shop somewhere so my wife and kids are no longer subject to the constant moves and school changes that military life bring. It will be great to be working at that second retirement at just 44 years old and having a more stable life when I hit that year mark.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Part of me wants to maintain the status quo and throw in a side-property on the other side of the country. That would be move to a whitetail state and continue putting in for non-resident points in several western states to help move along my western draw odds year to year. That way I can hunt every year no matter what, but still get the off-year opportunity to hunt out west. So far, I've done pretty decent rotating where I've been able to hunt doing that and only had one year off between antelope hunts.

    That said, The fishing (especially the fly fishing) in my part of Ohio, general sucks. I've caught the fly fishing bug bad, and the thought of killing time fishing highly productive, small mountain streams most of the year, or even all year in the years when I don't draw anything, is very, very appealing. I miss being able to make a few hour long drive into Utah and being able to hit a stretch of river where I never saw another human being for 12+ hours straight and catching 30+ trout per day. Then, I could buy a place out East and let some close buddies who live nearby hunt it in exchange for yearly scouting reports and trespass deterrence operations.

    The horrifying part of all of this is that I have only 6 years left to figure this all out! Once I crack 20, the goal is to buy a house and set up permanent shop somewhere so my wife and kids are no longer subject to the constant moves and school changes that military life bring. It will be great to be working at that second retirement at just 44 years old and having a more stable life when I hit that year mark.

    You can actually fly fish here in Texas. One place is up at Canyon Dam out of New Braunsfels where the water is very cold and it's stocked with Fresh Water trout.

    Also, some down here love to fly fish for Redfish, for why I don't know. It makes absolutely no sense to me. It's a lot of extra work for a fish you can catch readily on dead shrimp, live shrimp, dead mullet, live mullet, crabs, silicone lures, Mirror lures, and a thousand other lures that are way heavier than flies.

    I can take a light action spinning rod and reel and have way more fun catching heavy fish than I could flipping that fly back and forth getting tired. I'd rather get tired fighting the fish than trying to cast the bait unless it's a necessity. It's just not necessary for that species of fish.

    If I want to fly fish I'd much rather go to New Braunsfels or even more so to New Mexico or Colorado and catch fish that hit light, feathery lures that float on the surface that require a fly rod to cast rather than trying to catch a 9 pound fish that readily hits 1/2 oz and even heavier lures and even heavier baits that cast from more conventional rigs.

    But if you just want to do it, that has a following here, plus we have more whitetail deer than any other state. AND you can if you want hunt a slew of animals besides white tail to include Antelope and Mule Deer and numerous exotic species from Nilgai to Eland in Texas. And we have pretty fair waterfowl hunting here along with dove and quail and even pheasant in the Panhandle. We also have more than our share of wild hogs to hunt. We're also right next door to another Sportsmans Paradise, Louisiana. AND most importantly, it is possible to do all that and more without ever freezing your balls off.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    I've got to be honest with you, snake. Texas, and many parts of the south are already off my list of retirement locations purely due to the fact that I abhor the though of having to pay for an annual lease just to have a meaningful place to hunt. Correct me if I'm wrong, but my limited intake on Texas hunting involves 1) knowing a landowner who is a family friend and is willing to let you hunt their place or 2) pay a lot of money to maintain a good lease. The stories I hear about the public land hunting sound like anything but fun and getting permission via knocking on doors sounds like it's virtually a thing of the past. If I were to move to a whitetail state, it would probably somewhere in the Midwest like Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas or South Dakota where good public land hunting can be had and door-knock permission is still possible.
    snake284 wrote: »
    Also, some down here love to fly fish for Redfish, for why I don't know. It makes absolutely no sense to me. It's a lot of extra work for a fish you can catch readily on dead shrimp, live shrimp, dead mullet, live mullet, crabs, silicone lures, Mirror lures, and a thousand other lures that are way heavier than flies.

    I can take a light action spinning rod and reel and have way more fun catching heavy fish than I could flipping that fly back and forth getting tired. I'd rather get tired fighting the fish than trying to cast the bait unless it's a necessity. It's just not necessary for that species of fish.

    If I want to fly fish I'd much rather go to New Braunsfels or even more so to New Mexico or Colorado and catch fish that hit light, feathery lures that float on the surface that require a fly rod to cast rather than trying to catch a 9 pound fish that readily hits 1/2 oz and even heavier lures and even heavier baits that cast from more conventional rigs.
    The part I underlined above is exactly why people want to fly fish for redfish (and fly fish in general): the challenge. Catching them on bait is a know commodity. They will eat what they eat. Getting one fooled enough to take a visual lure - often one that you made yourself - is a whole other game and that's why people do it, even in the salt water. I actually tried for tarpon on a fly this past summer. I managed to hook 6 of them and not land a single one. It's extremely tough to get a good hookset in their bony mouths and they jump/shake violently above the water surface they instant they feel a hook.

    While I have had some fun on a stocked stream in Brookville, IN, fishing those wild trout in the high country is just an unmatched experience. Nothing makes your day like not only fishing in some pristine setting, but walking up on mule deer, moose or elk on your way to your favorite fishing hole.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I've got to be honest with you, snake. Texas, and many parts of the south are already off my list of retirement locations purely due to the fact that I abhor the though of having to pay for an annual lease just to have a meaningful place to hunt. Correct me if I'm wrong, but my limited intake on Texas hunting involves 1) knowing a landowner who is a family friend and is willing to let you hunt their place or 2) pay a lot of money to maintain a good lease. The stories I hear about the public land hunting sound like anything but fun and getting permission via knocking on doors sounds like it's virtually a thing of the past. If I were to move to a whitetail state, it would probably somewhere in the Midwest like Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas or South Dakota where good public land hunting can be had and door-knock permission is still possible.


    The part I underlined above is exactly why people want to fly fish for redfish (and fly fish in general): the challenge. Catching them on bait is a know commodity. They will eat what they eat. Getting one fooled enough to take a visual lure - often one that you made yourself - is a whole other game and that's why people do it, even in the salt water. I actually tried for tarpon on a fly this past summer. I managed to hook 6 of them and not land a single one. It's extremely tough to get a good hookset in their bony mouths and they jump/shake violently above the water surface they instant they feel a hook.

    While I have had some fun on a stocked stream in Brookville, IN, fishing those wild trout in the high country is just an unmatched experience. Nothing makes your day like not only fishing in some pristine setting, but walking up on mule deer, moose or elk on your way to your favorite fishing hole.

    One of the reasons I was glad to leave Texas is that I got fed up with the high cost of hunting. While you can hunt all the species that Snake mentioned, you had better be ready, willing and able to pony up some serious cash, or have a very good friend who will let you hunt for free. We get a lot of Texas hunters in Colorado every year simply because they can come up here, pay $500+ out of state license fees, and still hunt for less than what they pay to hunt in Texas. They also have a chance of getting an elk, which are pretty rare in the Lone Star state. I'll most likely move back to Texas before too much longer, but I'll miss the hunting and fly-fishing opportunities afforded here in Colorado.

    As for Luis' comments on fly-fishing, it's one of those things that you can't explain or don't need to. Watching a fly drift down a stream or river to see a trout rise to take it is pretty neat. It's even better when you sort of figure out where and how to drift the fly and realize that some skill and knowledge on your part is a factor. Plus, if the fly just happens to be one you have tied yourself, it's really a plus. I put catching a wild trout on a heavily fished stream with a fly you have tied yourself above killing a game animal with ammo you have loaded yourself. To me, it's more of a challenge.

    Dang, I need to stop. It's too cold to fish the river, and I'm all set to go. Better quit while I'm behind.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I've got to be honest with you, snake. Texas, and many parts of the south are already off my list of retirement locations purely due to the fact that I abhor the though of having to pay for an annual lease just to have a meaningful place to hunt. Correct me if I'm wrong, but my limited intake on Texas hunting involves 1) knowing a landowner who is a family friend and is willing to let you hunt their place or 2) pay a lot of money to maintain a good lease. The stories I hear about the public land hunting sound like anything but fun and getting permission via knocking on doors sounds like it's virtually a thing of the past. If I were to move to a whitetail state, it would probably somewhere in the Midwest like Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas or South Dakota where good public land hunting can be had and door-knock permission is still possible.


    The part I underlined above is exactly why people want to fly fish for redfish (and fly fish in general): the challenge. Catching them on bait is a know commodity. They will eat what they eat. Getting one fooled enough to take a visual lure - often one that you made yourself - is a whole other game and that's why people do it, even in the salt water. I actually tried for tarpon on a fly this past summer. I managed to hook 6 of them and not land a single one. It's extremely tough to get a good hookset in their bony mouths and they jump/shake violently above the water surface they instant they feel a hook.

    While I have had some fun on a stocked stream in Brookville, IN, fishing those wild trout in the high country is just an unmatched experience. Nothing makes your day like not only fishing in some pristine setting, but walking up on mule deer, moose or elk on your way to your favorite fishing hole.

    We differ in this in that I consider the challenge is when you hook the big red and fight it to the bank or boat when the fish weights 8 pounds and you have 6 pound test line. I say again, I will fly fish and have and enjoyed it. Once you get the hang of flipping that rod and feeding that line, which took me about a day to accomplish (Notice I said accomplish, not master) you can catch fish. But that technique and that equipment in my opinion isn't in itself about the challenge. That is about casting that light, feathery lure, it is a lure of sorts, into the area you believe the fish is lurking. But I do the same thing with my open faced spinning reel. I have caught fish on a fly rod, and I'm here to tell you it's a heavier rig than my spinning rods and reels. The light line is my challenge. I once hooked a 20 pound red on six pound test line on a small open face spinning reel. He damn near ripped all my line off twice. I managed to recover twice and reel him up to me before he wrapped the line around a trot line stake and the barnacles cut it. But I was within arms reach of the fish when he backed down on it like a tug boat and caused the line to cut on some barnacles growing on the stake. I could see him plainly and I know what he was. He had a big black spot on that canoe paddle tail the size of a 50 cent piece. WOW! That was fun. I couldn't have kept the fish anyway, that was in the days when the length limit was 30 inches but that fish was about 35 inches long. So losing him wasn't a big deal to me. I had gotten him within arm reach and I had the fight of my life bringing him up to me. That was the challenge and if I'd done it on a fly rod it wouldn't have been a bit more exciting or challenging. BTW, I hooked him with a 3oz Johnson Sprite spoon that had a red decal down it which attracts both reds and specks. Flipping that thing back and forth with a fly rod could have been dangerous if it would have hit somebody in the head.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    The fly line itself might be heavy on a saltwater rig, but you can toss a fly on 6 lb. test leader all day long if you want the ultralight challenge. For that matter, you can make make the leader out of any weight mono/fluoro you desire as long as it can turn over the fly.

    You can also use a shrimp imitation...

    img4cc54b1727ea3.jpg
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    The fly line itself might be heavy on a saltwater rig, but you can toss a fly on 6 lb. test leader all day long if you want the ultralight challenge. For that matter, you can make make the leader out of any weight mono/fluoro you desire as long as it can turn over the fly.

    You can also use a shrimp imitation...

    img4cc54b1727ea3.jpg

    Yeah whatever, but to me the challenge is in the fight, not the delivery. I love the fight I get with light equipment. I like Shimano open face spinning Reels with the bale trigger on 8 foot hand made medium action rods. Specs damn near hook themselves. I like the 8 footers because I can cast a good bit farther. Dang good rod like that costs you damn near $200.00 nowadays. You can put $275 in a rig in a flash.

    One question, what if you want to use Live Mullet or Croaker? Looks like all that flipping would kill your bait.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Live bait is the antithesis of fly fishing. You really never use it. The closest you typically come is very large streamer patterns that mimic bait fish, much like the Clouser minnows and double bunnies that I use for bass, crappie, etc. They even have enormous fly patterns that are used to fool tuna, sharks and various billfish.

    As for the fight, trust me, I'm with you: I tend to use much lighter rods and line than a lot of people. There's no hard and fast rule on what you cast with flies, much line there's no hard and fast rule on what round you use to hunt a given critter. You pick what you pick and live with the tradeoffs you make.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,925 Senior Member
    Six if you get a place in NE, I'll be coming out to hunt! White tail is pretty much the same in eastern CO. Know someone, or pay. Very little public areas with deer on them.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Live bait is the antithesis of fly fishing. You really never use it. The closest you typically come is very large streamer patterns that mimic bait fish, much like the Clouser minnows and double bunnies that I use for bass, crappie, etc. They even have enormous fly patterns that are used to fool tuna, sharks and various billfish.

    As for the fight, trust me, I'm with you: I tend to use much lighter rods and line than a lot of people. There's no hard and fast rule on what you cast with flies, much line there's no hard and fast rule on what round you use to hunt a given critter. You pick what you pick and live with the tradeoffs you make.


    Agreed. But when I'm red fishing or speckle trout fishing I like bait in the summer. This is mainly due to the fact that in the cooler months a lot of the plankton dies off and the water is clearer and since lures rely on visibility then the fish hit them better. In cooler weather I have good luck with lures. But in the warmer months seems like bait is the ticket. Red Fish will usually hit crabs, either dead or alive, mullet either live or dead, and Shrimp either live or dead, in the summer and early fall and trout love live shrimp and live Croakers. They love live shrimp anytime, but once croakers get big in the late summer they don't hit them too regular. In the fall we do a lot of trolling either idling the outboard or running with the trolling motor casting to the front and sides of the boat with lures. This is especially effective up the Lavaca-Navidad River system and when we go beyond where the Lavaca ties in, up the Navidad, this is a good way to get a limit of specks quick in the fall with the right lures.

    Man I love that kind of fishing. And I love speckle sea trout about as well as any fish there is with the exception of good, fresh flathead catfish and maybe flounder.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • christiechristie Member Posts: 86 Member
    Great job twa and everyone.

    After 10 years on this forum taking notes and 11 years as a hunter I am proud to say 1 resident buck, 1 non-resident buck, over a dozen ducks, my first prairie chicken and my first Canada goose.
    The bird meat and half of one deer is already eaten up by me. I'm saving so much on meat grocery bills.

    This is achievement.
    "I couldn't be more proud and humbled by the experience"- said by a successful someone
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Six if you get a place in NE, I'll be coming out to hunt! White tail is pretty much the same in eastern CO. Know someone, or pay. Very little public areas with deer on them.
    You would be more than welcome. The whitetails in the region of the country are plentiful and stupid big, even after the massive EHD and blue tongue disease die-off from a few years back. Even the does dwarf bucks I've seen elsewhere around the country.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    christie wrote: »
    Great job twa and everyone.

    After 10 years on this forum taking notes and 11 years as a hunter I am proud to say 1 resident buck, 1 non-resident buck, over a dozen ducks, my first prairie chicken and my first Canada goose.
    The bird meat and half of one deer is already eaten up by me. I'm saving so much on meat grocery bills.

    This is achievement.

    WOW Christie, how'd we miss you on here? Or maybe just me. Anyway, sounds like you're doing pretty well. Keep at it, and since I didn't know you before, Welcome to the Forum.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,767 Senior Member
    christie wrote: »
    Great job twa and everyone.

    After 10 years on this forum taking notes and 11 years as a hunter I am proud to say 1 resident buck, 1 non-resident buck, over a dozen ducks, my first prairie chicken and my first Canada goose.
    The bird meat and half of one deer is already eaten up by me. I'm saving so much on meat grocery bills.

    This is achievement.

    Nice work!...Welcome back, it's been awhile...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    You would be more than welcome. The whitetails in the region of the country are plentiful and stupid big, even after the massive EHD and blue tongue disease die-off from a few years back. Even the does dwarf bucks I've seen elsewhere around the country.

    Six just out of curiosity, how much does an out of state Whitetail license cost there?My cousin's son graduated from University of Nebraska Lincoln and was up there for four years of college. He's a hunter and outdoorsman and he's always talking about hunting up there. He was a Gymnast and had a four year scholarship there. He knows a bunch of people there and says he can get a hunt up. But I never was interested because I thought it would cost too much. But now you got me interested.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    An either-sex tag ran a shade over $200 last time hunted there a few years back [looks like it's right at $216 now]. It was a better deal before the disease outbreak killed of nearly 40% of the herd and they were still giving out *free* bonus antlerless tags. When that was the case, I would fly back, shoot the biggest doe in the first group that came through and then ride out the either-sex tag until a buck came along worth shooting. If that didn't happen, I would just shoot another doe in the final couple of days. This was all on public land, by the way...

    Though some units are getting the bonus tags again after several good years of deer production, not all have them back yet. A couple more reasonable winters and things should be back to how they were 5 years ago, but success in Nebraska has still been very good for the guys I know that hunt there.

    The best deal going in Nebraska? Youth tags - resident or non-resident - are just $5!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    An either-sex tag ran a shade over $200 last time hunted there a few years back [looks like it's right at $216 now]. It was a better deal before the disease outbreak killed of nearly 40% of the herd and they were still giving out *free* bonus antlerless tags. When that was the case, I would fly back, shoot the biggest doe in the first group that came through and then ride out the either-sex tag until a buck came along worth shooting. If that didn't happen, I would just shoot another doe in the final couple of days. This was all on public land, by the way...

    Though some units are getting the bonus tags again after several good years of deer production, not all have them back yet. A couple more reasonable winters and things should be back to how they were 5 years ago, but success in Nebraska has still been very good for the guys I know that hunt there.

    The best deal going in Nebraska? Youth tags - resident or non-resident - are just $5!

    What constitute Youth in Nebraska, Up through 16 years old? That's what Texas is. If so, my grand son will be 17 next October. He'll be too old if that's the case. He beat me and his dad this year getting two deer, a doe and a buck. He shot that spike buck with my .300 Weatherby Mag. at about 100 yards. Now he wants to take my .300 WBY away. Hehehehe. Anyway I think Nebraska may be in our future. $216 is not bad for an either sex tag. Do like you said or otherwise just hold out until the last day and if you haven't scored a buck, just shoot a doe.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Nebraska youth = 10-15 years of age

    10 is the minimum age/15 is the max
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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