Home Main Category General Firearms

WIN. M94

jaywaptijaywapti Senior MemberPosts: 4,958 Senior Member
I have a M-94 AE 30-30, NIB, It's a IAM special edition, not listed as commemorative, I'm trying to find its value, I've checked all the books, gunbroker, etc. anyone have any idea where else to look or know its value.

JAY
THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT

Replies

  • wizard78wizard78 Senior Member Posts: 1,004 Senior Member

    “When guns are outlawed, only patriots will have guns.”
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    As far as Post 63 Model 94s go, those AEs are solid. I have one I've had since 1981 and it ain't goin nowhere! It's a fixture to me. It shoots good enough for what it is, it's light, low recoil, and handles like a dream. If I had any real money in my gun fund I'd make you an offer. I'd love to have another one here.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Wizard, thanks, found it before but it didn't help.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • wizard78wizard78 Senior Member Posts: 1,004 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    Wizard, thanks, found it before but it didn't help. JAY

    The part I was referring to was "You have to remember there were only 1000 made of the IAM commemorative rifles in 30/30 caliber".

    "The IAM Model 94 is technically not a "commemorative". Instead, it is a "Special Edition".

    The rarest of the Model 94 standard commemoratives is as follows;

    1964 WYOMING DIAMOND JUBILEE 30-30 cal. 1500 mfg.
    1967 ALASKA PURCHASE CENTENNIAL 30-30 cal. 1500 mfg"

    The IAM is rarer than the rarest Model 94 standard commemoratives . Think twice before you offer it at a LOW price. If it is as you say, NIB, then there are a lot of collectors out there that might pay big money for it to complete their collection.

    3 years ago, Burt in that link, set a value of $2200 to $2400 for it.

    “When guns are outlawed, only patriots will have guns.”
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Wizard, Quite a while ago ,one sold on GB for around $800. , but that's the only one I ever saw listed. I had no idea that there were only 1000 made, maybe it is worth $2200.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    I think that the reason some of the people on the Winchester forum valued it low is because of the size of the market for it. I was in the IAM and know what it is but a rifle comemorating the IAM would only appeal to someone affiliated with the IAM. I recently bought another 94 in 30-30 and it was tough to find on that wasn't some kind of comemorative. On some firearms, the value is determined by the market for it rather than the rarity.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 1,371 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    I have a M-94 AE 30-30, NIB, It's a IAM special edition, not listed as commemorative, I'm trying to find its value, I've checked all the books, gunbroker, etc. anyone have any idea where else to look or know its value.

    JAY

    My LGS had one in similar condition on consignment for sale for around $700 a few months ago. I don't know if it sold at that price.

    I didn't want it b/c,
    1) I am not in that union, and
    2) post 94's aren't a great investment.

    There are so many "special" ones out there, I'd rather have a plain one at a better price. Thus, I bought my 94 for $400.
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 1,371 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Yes but the other side of that equation is that putting a 1 of 1000 gun on a used rack at the local gun store is a silly way to try to sell. You are severely limiting your exposure and the local consumer knowledge level is usually dismal at best. A gun like that, if you have the patience to wait for the right buyer, need to be listed in Gunbroker at the right price and just leave it there until it builds a following of watchers. At some point a collector will figure out that you are serious about your price and you are NOT going to give the gun away and put in a bid, then they all jump in.

    I had that issue with my 1 in 500 P7. Last batch ever made. When I listed in in GB I got a bazillion obnoxious emails telling me it was overpriced, that it was not worth anymore than a standard shooter and all such nonsense. I answered them all cordially telling them that I was NOT a distressed seller and in no hurry to sell, that the gun was priced fairly and at my minimum acceptable price, and that if they found the price too high then it was not the gun for them but thanks for your interest. Finally after a few months of re-listing at the same price I had a bidding war and I sold for $300 higher than I listed it for. At that point the gun had about 10 watchers, including all the yodels that were telling me it was not worth what I was asking...

    Fair point. The only issue I have with it is the post '64 M94's had so many different special/collectors versions that I just don't see much long term investment value in most of them.

    But, I do agree with your sales strategy for special guns. Unless you find the guy who "needs" that special edition, you'll never get a good price.
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 1,371 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Yep, that's the whole point. If 500 folks see your gun every day you have a much better chance of the right buyer finding you than if 5 folks see the gun every week. Sales is ALWAYS a well understood numbers game.

    I agree with the Winchester collectibles but in new condition rifle prices have been creeping up steadily because many folks decided to just use them as shooters since the market was soft for them for a long time, so NIB is becoming quite rare and collectors are noticing.

    For people looking at a m94 in new or like new condition to shoot, they still offer a way to get a new "shooter" for less than the cost of a new Japanese M94. (Plus, a Japanese M94 feels "wrong").

    If I hadn't found my gun (I took my time looking), I would have made an offer on it.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement