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Rifle build

rberglofrberglof Senior MemberPosts: 2,772 Senior Member
I have a Turkish Mauser action so decided I had enough time before leaving for North Dakota to get a start a the build, went to then gun show in Bakersfield and picked up a new takeoff Savage mdl 10 308 barrel for $40.00. Had to buy a few parts from Brownells and a stock from Boyds.
A friend and machinist of my brother re cut the barrel for the Mauser for me for free.

I will not get it finished before we leave but hope to get it completed in North Dakota and see how it shoots
Here are pictures of the progress so far.

new barrel and action in Boyds thumb hole stock
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As you can see the Savage barrel is only a little larger in diameter then the Turkish Mauser.
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Barrel threads have been cut and in this picture you can see the Timney trigger.
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Close up of barrel.
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Barrel nut is used to set head space.
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Together but still need to square the receiver face .
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Replies

  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,628 Senior Member
    A Savage Barrel nut on a Mauser action? I love it! That ought to make some traditionalists have an aneurism!
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,877 Senior Member
    Sweet....Great idea with the barrel nut. A Savage Mauser, who would'a thunk.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Is getting the extra inch of barrel length really worth using the barrel nut? Since the barrel had to be rethreaded anyway, why not go ahead and do it right? One of the innovative design features of the Mauser 98 was spreading the chamber pressure between two shoulders, something the use of a locknut eliminates. A properly threaded and torqued barrel more than doubles the strength of the receiver ring area.
    Jerry
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    I used the barrel nut not because it is not touching the inner shoulder but when torqued down it came out a bit tight so backed it off and hand tight on inner shoulder the head space is right on, The barrel nut also locks it to the outer shoulder seeing as how the barrel is just slightly larger than the newly threaded area. Teach If you believe this to be unsafe please say so and if it is not this could also be made into an switch barrel rifle.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    It might not be unsafe, just unwise and butt-ugly. The barrel should have been cut back to eliminate the Savage thread and locknut, threaded and shouldered properly, and had a new chamber cut. You've basically dropped the receiver ring strength back to something resembling a Ruger M77 or a Savage 110. That's not bad, but it is certainly less than a 98 Mauser was engineered to provide. If the barrel nut is needed to provide a shoulder to butt against the receiver, it would have been possible to fabricate one without the slots, using one spanner wrench hole at the bottom of the receiver ring to hide it under the stock wood.
    Jerry
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    Teach I had thought about having a nut made but wanted to see how this would work and the nut was only 10 dollars so figured might as well give it a try.
    With the barrel against the inner shoulder at a good hand tightened fit and the nut well tightened how much strength is really lost?
    When I had torqued the barrel down I found that I had one round out of a box of Federal 308s was a little bit of a tight fit and all the rest had no resistance at all.
    I have a no-go gauge on hand but not the go gauge guess I should go ahead and pick one up, only have fifty dollars invested in this barrel setup so figured I would give it a try.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    My rule of thumb when threading a Mauser 98 barrel is to make the shoulder-to shoulder distance on the barrel .002" less than the distance from the front of the receiver to the inner shoulder. This allows the front shoulder to contact first, and thread stretch allows the inner shoulder to lock up solidly as the barrel is tightened. I use approximately 200 FT/LB of torque to assure a solid barrel/receiver lockup. Of course, the average shoulder height on a Shilen or Douglas barrel is approximately 1/8", so there's plenty of meat there to get a good solid lockup. An E.R. Shaw barrel is a bit thicker in the chamber area. Your Savage barrel doesn't have that much of a lip to butt against the front of the receiver, so the nut is probably a necessity. If I had a .308 reamer and a go gauge, I'd be glad to loan it to you to correct the headspace with the barrel torqued down. So far, I haven't gotten around to building any of the .308-based rifles. Have you thought about lapping the boltface or the locking lugs to back the boltface up a little? I do have a 98 Mauser lug-lapping tool you're welcome to use.
    Jerry
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    Thank you for your response Teach and no I had not thought about that, I will be leaving for North Dakota next Tuesday so will not be doing anymore work on it till I get there.
    Should be there till middle of October.
    I hope to get a 100 yard range put in and my building set up as a shop.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I've been building sporters on Turk Mauser actions for 20-something years. They USED to be cheap! They've got a few oddball features, like having small-ring threads in a large ring receiver on occasion, plus a really strange-looking bolt release that forms part of the stripper clip guide on some of the older ones. I like to lap the bolt lugs and square up the front of the receiver before fitting and headspacing a barrel, even built fixtures to do both of those operations. Get in touch once you're settled in at the new place, and I'll be glad to collaborate with you any way I can.
    Jerry
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    Thank you Teach am looking forward to it.
    Wambli after discussing this with Jerry I went on a search about this build and found something interesting Google switch barreled Mauser.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,252 Senior Member
    I have a Clymer .308 finish reamer and headspace gauges I will loan out if needed!!
    I also have same for .280 Rem.
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    I appreciate that Big Al1 may take you up on that when we get to North Dakota.
    Ron
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    A switch-barrel rifle isn't terribly difficult to build if a smith has machine tools capable of holding precise tolerances. The usual trick is to come up with an interrupted-thread attachment between the barrel and the receiver that will allow the barrel to be dismounted with a 1/4 turn twist, and then to fit another one or more barrels that have an identical thread pattern. The mating surfaces are a pair of precision ground plates that meet and latch together just as the headspace corrects itself and the thread runs out of movement. Using a locknut would simplify this process by allowing one receiver to accept multiple barrels which headspace correctly just as the rear shoulder bottoms out. I think I'd custom-fabricate a locknut that uses a hidden spanner wrench slot or hole and blends into the barrel contour as closely as possible.

    Hmmmm- - - -I've got a few 98 Mauser receivers hanging out in the "someday it's gonna be a project" bin. One of 'em might have just found its destiny!
    Jerry
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    Jerry sounds about like the Browning take down 22 that I have.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    .22's are pretty simple. My Ithaca M37 shotguns have a similar barrel attachment, with a 1/4 turn thread disconnect and a tension nut at the end of the magazine tube to take up the slack and lock the barrel into position. As the cartridge increases in power the thrust on the takedown joint gets into dangerous territory in a hurry. A full thread/locknut system would handle that problem a lot better than an interrupted thread.
    Jerry
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,772 Senior Member
    DSCF2768_zps4631d47a.jpg

    With the 270 barrel installed. I did cheat a little, found an action at a gun show for $180.00 that already had all the work done and used it. Has not been fired in this configuration. Our weather is getting better and may have found a place to shoot a few miles down the road.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    .22's are pretty simple. My Ithaca M37 shotguns have a similar barrel attachment, with a 1/4 turn thread disconnect and a tension nut at the end of the magazine tube
    to take up the slack and lock the barrel into position.
    As the cartridge increases in power the thrust on the takedown joint gets into dangerous territory in a hurry. A full thread/locknut system would handle that problem a lot better than an interrupted thread.
    Jerry[/QUOTE.

    Similar to your Ithaca shotgun, my dad's old Model 31 Remington was a take down also with interrupted threads where you pushed down on a spring loaded disk with a hole in it where a pin on the barrel fit, pushing the disk down it cleared the pin and permitted the barrel to turn 1/4 a turn disengaging the threads and the barrel slid out.

    He got that shotgun in 1938 as a birthday present from his mother. It had gotten loose through the years shooting high brass magnum shells and I quit using it and was looking to have somebody see what they could do to tighten it or convert it to a more conventional design. But when he died it was willed to one of my nephews. He didn't will me but one gun, his German Mauser Pistol in 7.65 (32ACP) because as he'd said, I had enough guns of my own, which was quite correct. My nephew has no plans to shoot that shotgun and is just keeping it as a keepsake.

    Now you got me to thinking about that tension nut. I don't remember if it had such an animal. That might cure the looseness. I know the Remingtons are close in design to the Ithaca (Other than the bottom ejection) and several other shotguns of the period. But I don't remember any such nut on the model 31. Are you familiar with the Model 31 Remington? Do you know if they have one?
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Snake, here's a video of a Model 31 takedown procedure.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpgVDVjwUs4

    The difference is that the Ithaca uses a threaded nut at the front of the magazine to lock the barrel in place and tension the barrel thread, while Remington uses a spring-loaded barrel lock. You might consider installing a stronger spring for the barrel lock to put more forward pressure on the barrel, but it looks like yours might have a worn barrel thread from firing a lot of rounds.
    Jerry
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