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Grey's Anatomy and the Second Amendment

breamfisherbreamfisher Senior MemberPosts: 13,493 Senior Member
I don't really "watch" the show as much as I'm just in my room while my wife watches it. I'm usually surfing the web, lurking on forums while it's on. But last night I wanted to watch it because I knew the night-time soap opera was going to have a "special guns" episode. Kid accidentally shoots another with a gun, surgeons have to perform tricky work to save him and keep him from being paralyzed, kid crashes while they're working on the spine, they defib him while working on the spine, now he can't walk, ever. Kinda predictable story given the show.

I knew the kid wouldn't walk because of the five? surgeons working on him, only one had a gun. The others had varying levels of not wanting them, with one saying that guns in the house are more dangerous than not having one. The kid who shot his friend got to the gun because it wasn't in a lock box while the parents were away and the babysitter was there. Gun-owning doc decided she'd grown out of the need for the gun and wanted to sell it. Show ended with a Brady Center public disservice announcement where they said if you have a gun in the house, keep it in a lockbox unloaded with the ammo separate.

So as we're getting ready for bed my wife wonders aloud if we need a lockbox for my CCW/bedside gun to keep the 3-year old from getting to it. Which is kinda reasonable I suppose, but I ain't keeping the gun unloaded. All our other firearms are in a safe. We got it before my son was born, and I was wanting to get it anyway. So no worries on the safe. But getting back to the lockbox... I pointed out that while I'm awake the handgun is pretty secure because it's on my person while I'm awake. If my son gets to the gun at night, he'll be right beside me, and right now he won't be able to get bedside without waking me up. Might need one in later years, but maybe not. My brother and I grew up knowing where my Dad kept his unlocked firearms and didn't touch them. At least I didn't.

Anyway, I got to thinking... here's a nighttime soap opera... how many guys or women are now reconsidering how their gear is stowed? It's not a bad idea to think about, but given the light and "PSA," how will these folks lean?
Overkill is underrated.

Replies

  • shushshush Senior Member Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    Anyway, I got to thinking... here's a nighttime soap opera... how many guys or women are now reconsidering how their gear is stowed?
    It's not a bad idea to think about, but given the light and "PSA," how will these folks lean?


    Subliminally to the left.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    When I was growing up, the firearms were kept in a glass front gun cabinet in Mom and Dad's bedroom. It wasn't locked after I turned 5 y.o. because, at 5 I knew the punishment for going into that cabinet was eating standing up and sleeping on my stomach for a month while my hind end cooled down. I also knew that if I asked my Dad, he'd let me handle any of them and show me how they worked, and we might just go pop off a few rounds. I also knew that it was strictly forbidden to touch a firearm in anyone's house without explicit permission from the owner to do so.

    Kids and dogs need training, and for the same reason.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,825 Senior Member
    Liberal networks have been brain washing for years. Time to block a few channels!
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,954 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    When I was growing up, the firearms were kept in a glass front gun cabinet in Mom and Dad's bedroom. It wasn't locked after I turned 5 y.o. because, at 5 I knew the punishment for going into that cabinet was eating standing up and sleeping on my stomach for a month while my hind end cooled down. I also knew that if I asked my Dad, he'd let me handle any of them and show me how they worked, and we might just go pop off a few rounds. I also knew that it was strictly forbidden to touch a firearm in anyone's house without explicit permission from the owner to do so.

    Kids and dogs need training, and for the same reason.

    Basically the same treatment we received as kids, except the guns were stored where no 5 yr old could get to them. Did the same with my kids. Never an issue.

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,610 Senior Member
    C'mon, Bream...you can admit you like the show! :wink:

    Most 'entertainment' over the past few decades has been decidedly anti-gun. There has been very little positive gun imagery, and what little exists is mostly tempered with cautionary tales of well-intentioned buffoons who are simply not wily enough to comprehend all the pitfalls of being a firearm owner.

    In much the same way, men are usually shown to be less than intelligent than women and whites are usually dumber than their darker skinned peers. The characters and names change, but the formulae remain constant.
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Firearms were never locked up in my home growing up. Ammo, however, was secured and I don't remember ever knowing where it was.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    As a kid I got into everything I wasn't supposed to and blatantly courted disaster like it was sworn duty.
    I never touched the unlocked guns. I knew what they were, where they were, and what they could do. I also knew how to use them.

    Currently everything is locked up. My house gun is in a lock box loaded and readily accessible. My son knows not to touch guns without permission. He also knows finger off the trigger, all guns are always loaded, and muzzle control. Whenever he asks, he's allowed to handle anything he wants to. No secrets no mysterie.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    Nothing was locked up when I was a kid nor when our kids were kids or when the Grandkids came over.

    Now their locked up.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    coolgunguy wrote: »
    C'mon, Bream...you can admit you like the show! :wink:

    Most 'entertainment' over the past few decades has been decidedly anti-gun. There has been very little positive gun imagery, and what little exists is mostly tempered with cautionary tales of well-intentioned buffoons who are simply not wily enough to comprehend all the pitfalls of being a firearm owner.


    In much the same way, men are usually shown to be less than intelligent than women and whites are usually dumber than their darker skinned peers. The characters and names change, but the formulae remain constant.

    I've been watching TV all my life. I can't remember ever hearing a positive note on guns on the lame stream media. It's all in the Libtard Left's Agenda to change this country into a socialist state without any rights guaranteed to the populace. It's right out of the Commie Manifesto. All people should read it and beware.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    As for the issue with kid's safety and how to deal with it? I think we all need to use our heads and do what we think will work to make our homes safe and where we can still defend ourselves and family against a bad guy. Myself I don't leave guns lying around unattended, but I also don't believe in hiding them somewhere other than in a safe. I personally have one gun loaded for the self defense scenario, but I have a problem with saying "My kids know better than to mess with my guns" or something on that order. If all kids were the same and we could depend on them not to play with them, it would be great, but that's not the case. Not all kids are the same. Some will do what you least expect when you turn your back. Some are better than most adults. Then there's a mix in between. If all kids were mature enough to be trusted there would not be any minimum drinking age, driving age, or voting age. A lot of kids aren't mature yet when they turn even 18. I know how I handle this by limiting access and training. But what works for you may be different.

    All my kids got a lot of lectures on firearm safety. When I say limited access I don't mean all my guns were hidden. But I only had one at my disposal. and not lying around where kids or even drunks could get to them. I had them where myself or my wife could get to them in a hurry. Anyway, this is not an easy question and I don't know if there's a 100% fool proof answer to it.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Something to consider is not just your kids but any other kids who might now or in the future enter your home.

    Yeah, my daughter is now 16 and has friends (& interested boys) that are mobile. I get home from work and there are teens on my couch and in my food.

    My guns now reside with my liquor.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    It's different for everybody. I knew where my dad hid all of his guns (3) by age 9 or 10, and regularly took them out and played with them, if left alone for an hour. Now, I had been handling them and getting the lectures about safety for about 6-7 years by that time, and always made sure they were unloaded, and replaced precisely how I found them, after my 5-10 minute 'fix.' Had I ever been caught, it would have been bad news.

    Knowing that, I own a gun safe that only I can open. I do keep one loaded pistol unlocked, even when my grand kids are around, but I keep it in a Maxpedition bag, zipped up, and on a high shelf that none of them dare bother...if they even care. Any slight change in any of them's behavior could change that practice, if I ever doubted the safety of the present situation. Only the two boys are interested, and they are allowed to fondle any of them, one at a time, for as long as they want, under my supervision. Both of them know that my liberal policy on their gun-handling depends entirely on whether I trust them, and they guard that trust carefully.
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,610 Senior Member
    I grew up around guns, (friends, family, etc.) but we never had them in our house until much later. That fact (I think) was what caused me issues later...things could have been much worse, but were plenty bad enough. Like Early, I took to chaos like a duck to water.
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,914 Senior Member
    I raised a step son, son and step daughter. All knew about the guns, where they were and that they could handle them, learn how they worked and shoot them whenever they desired. Of course under supervision. Once son was bragging to friends what kind of guns we had, oldest boy smacked him to shut him up and told him those will be ours someday, but not if people know about them and steal them. L3sson learned by younger brother. Daughter never cared until her late teens and out of the blue asked me to take her shooting. Now she is a safe enthusiast that puts her BF to shame with skills and safety.
    All kids are different and need to be treated and trusted differently. But all must be taught to respect all tools, just like the stove is hot, the knife cuts and so on. Out of sight is good, but take away the mystery and you take away the desire to sneak.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,493 Senior Member
    Diver,
    I think your "take away the mystery" line is key. My Dad did that with my brother and I. He also set up an object lesson: put a bucket of water out, then shot it with a shotgun.
    Message received: guns can cause LOTS of damage if you're not careful.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    Diver,
    I think your "take away the mystery" line is key. My Dad did that with my brother and I. He also set up an object lesson: put a bucket of water out, then shot it with a shotgun.
    Message received: guns can cause LOTS of damage if you're not careful.

    I bought an airsoft pistol several years ago, that I shoot red wasps with while sitting on the front porch. It looks exactly like a Walther PPS, except for the orange tip. I let all of the grand kids play with it, under about the same rules as a real gun, and I have always left it laying on a little table beside my chair. The girls lost interest in it within the first 15 minutes. The boys will still play with it occasionally, when sitting in one of the porch chairs, but it's no big deal to them, either. Mostly, it just lays on the table, with seven kids buzzing by it continuously, on weekends. The fascination with guns has been gone for a long time, and it's just another boring object, laying on the table. Nobody looks at it as a toy - it's just a lethal (for wasps) weapon that Grandpa kills bugs with, from ten feet away, and they have no desire to get that close to a red wasp, so - nothing to see here.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    CaliFFL wrote: »
    Yeah, my daughter is now 16 and has friends (& interested boys) that are mobile. I get home from work and there are teens on my couch and in my food.

    My guns now reside with my liquor.

    With your liquor? Man when I was a kid that's the second thing on my list I was looking for. My dad always had a fifth of cheap bourbon in his sock drawer. That was the closest thing he had to a liquor cabinet. If there would have been a gun in there too, I would have been playing with it and that may have caused a tragedy. But the Good Lord was with me and I got through those years with my head in tact.

    Oh, BTW, don't ask me how I knew where the Whiskey was, but he never caught on to his bourbon being diluted.

    :tooth:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    When I was a kid one of the other kids in the neighborhood found a gun while dogsitting for another neighbor and managed to blow a hole through his hand. He's lucky that's all he did. 1)Teaching your kids respect for firearms is absolutely necessary, but not necessarily sufficient to prevent tragedy. When there are kids in my house there are no guns remotely accessible to them. 2) Something to consider is not just your kids but any other kids who might now or in the future enter your home.

    1) Right on. We need to keep pounding in the message of gun safety every chance we get. The more exposure to that message, the more it is on our kids minds. I wanted my kids and I want my grandkids now, to think about safety everytime they contemplate picking up a firearm. I want that first in their thought process as it should also be first in ours. But we still must keep in mind who we're dealing with, kids that very well may be very immature.

    2) Exactly! Because it's not just your kids you have to worry about. And some of those "OTHER" Kids that enter your home may not have had the training and emphasis on safety that you gave yours.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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