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M.A.T vs M.A.Ed

centermass556centermass556 Senior MemberPosts: 3,534 Senior Member
Smart people, or people that have educators in their families, Can you please explain what the difference/s in the two Master's degrees is/are. And, what may possibly be the best for me if I want to teach High school.

Thank you.
"To have really lived, you must have almost died. To those who have fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."

Replies

  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    My wife was a teacher in the 70s. At that time, she was advised to get her bachelors degree, and then get a job teaching. If she wanted a Masters, get it AFTER she had started teaching.

    I don't know if that's good advice today.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Wild TurkeyWild Turkey Member Posts: 78 Member
    When I decided to become a teacher I had a BS (not in education) so I needed to take courses to get "Certified" in Kentucky.

    Checked with local college and they explained the MAT was designed for folks in that situation -- we could take Education courses that would count towards a Master's degree which meant I would end up with both my "Teaching Certificate" and a Master's degree (required for a "permanent" certificate) at graduation.

    Then it was just a matter of finding a school with an opening in my fields, which was another problem.

    So, in summary, the MAT is for folks who have a BS and no teaching certificate.

    I don't know what implications about MAT and qualifying for a PhD but I knew all I wanted was a teaching job, not an administrative one.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,046 Senior Member
    If you are thinking of going into teaching after retiring from the military, you are in for a shock.

    Teaching burns people up unless you truly feel that as a calling (and even a lot of those end up getting burned out), and if you are used to rules, structure, etc... Well, in theory, it's there. Much like dark matter- it exists in theory, but no one has ever observed it.

    My wife is an educator, and I come from a family of educators. At a lot of times, I would not wish that career on an enemy (Of course I have a very lot threshold for 'OPKs' (other people's kids)). There seem to be 2 kinds of teachers- 1) the ones that are passionate about teaching and feel it as a calling, put in 80 hour weeks, and spend more time at school than at home; and 2) the ones that see it as a way to get good benefits, work 9 months and get a year round paycheck, and beat the bus out of the parking lot at 3:30.

    As for the OP question, I'll ask my wife when she gets home from dealing with OPKs.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    My eldest daughter is a high school counselor and has a M.A.Ed., and has just completed the state certification tests for further advancement. I just talked to her on the phone and asked her your question. She said that it may vary, by state, but that the M.A.Ed. degree was best for her, to advance within the school system she is in, because the higher paying jobs were in administration.

    The M.A.T. is not really that helpful if being a principal or superintendent is the goal. The M.A.T. is more specifically geared to the teacher skills, and would likely only benefit in seeking employment as a teacher in some of the harder to get jobs, in highly rated school systems, wherever they might be.

    She didn't intend to move off, so she elected to go the administrative route and teach in the school she graduated from, that her own children now attend.

    EDITED TO ADD:

    I tend to agree with bullsi's assessment of the satisfaction level you might encounter, having watched my daughter's career. She started as a deaf education major, teaching hearing impaired children, and gradually transitioned through other jobs to the high school counselor position. She is dedicated to her job, but the administrative politics, federal and state rules, parents, ticket punchers in the ranks, and school boards have taken a toll on her idealistic beginnings.

    On the other hand, I think she would agree with me that Marine 1st Sergeants might be just the ticket to fix most school systems.
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,632 Senior Member
    I haven't a clue on the degree classifications, but I'll echo what others have said about being a teacher; If you don't feel it burning deep in the fiber of your being, save yourself the trouble. If you do feel that way, research districts and pick one that best suits you. No use trying to hammer a square peg (you) into a round hole (your intended district). Be prepared for LOTS of frustration, lots of apathy, lots of finger pointing and not much in the way of solutions. OTOH, when you see the light go on in 'that' student's eyes, it might just be worth it all. My wife has taught all her adult life and wouldn't trade it for the world...but there are times...
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • centermass556centermass556 Senior Member Posts: 3,534 Senior Member
    Thanks for the replies folks.

    I don't know if some of you remember my various career questions over the years as I started to think about life after the Army. I have tossed around a few things; staying in the commo world in some fashion, being a fire-fighter, being a cop, and possibly being a bum. It was right after my last deployment to Afghanistan (2011), that it hit me. I really want to be a Teacher. I enjoy teaching. I know by an large that it will be an uphill battle. But so is being in the today's Army. Many of the frustrations you guys have typed out about teaching, exist in the Army today. They are almost parallel.

    I want to pursue the Masters, or at least start it, while I am still on Active Duty...Everything is paid for this way. When I get back, I plan to have a face to face with the Columbia Country School District in Georgia. But, all the back ground information I have before I arrive will help.

    The way I figure, Teaching is almost the perfect post military Career. It allows you to continue to serve at the community level. It allows you to seek your amount of "hooah", if you want to just teach you can do that and if you want to play the game and move up the pole of administration, you can do that. I get two weeks off each year to hunt. I get the summer off to fish. But most importantly I want to do it. Education is just as important to National Defense as tanks and missiles. If I only reach one kid each year, then that is one more.

    and if it doesn't pan out, I'll call my buddy Rob and have him get me a job at SOROC.
    "To have really lived, you must have almost died. To those who have fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,206 Senior Member
    Beware the union kool-aid drinkers with the staff, 1% of the people will cause 99% of your problems at work. Other than that, I think any school district would be VERY happy to have you.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,690 Senior Member
    What subject(s) do you want to teach? If it's Social Studies/History, a LOT of coach's have that certification and get those jobs.

    If it's more "technical/technology" related then take a look at the Vo-techs in the area you want to move to. They're probably not called "Vo-Tech" any more though: Career Center, Career and Technical School, School of Science and Technology or some variation thereof. You may not have to have an "education" degree to teach in a vocational school, depending on the subject.

    Also, check with the Georgia Dept of Ed. they may have a "Troops to Teacher" program. Also ask if GA has an "Alternative Route" program. That's for people with, say, a Mathematics degree or Chemistry degree but not the education courses. You take a course or 2 while you teach. Or at least that's how it works in MS. I also suggest contacting the university nearest to where you want to live that has a teacher ed program: talk to an advisor about your plans, have them look at your college transcript so they can recommend a course of study that will be accepted in Georgia. Each state has their own requirements so you need to know for sure what GA requires. If you take classes other than in GA. make sure those courses will transfer if you plan on taking courses in one state then finish up in Ga.

    I have a degree in Business Mgt. 12 yrs later I decided I wanted to teach. I contacted the university, spoke to an advisor, he pulled my transcript and worked up a course of study. I had to take 60 hrs in order to get a MS certification. I do not have an education degree of any kind. I did not get a master's. I wish now I had asked about that route. MS pays more if you have a master's degree.

    I don't know how old you are. but I can guarantee you that kids (and parents) have changed since you were in school. Teachers have to tolerate a WHOLE LOT more misbehavior today from kids than when I was in school. I just finished my 17th yr and I can tell a difference.

    Whatever you decide. good luck to you. Thank you for your service.
  • centermass556centermass556 Senior Member Posts: 3,534 Senior Member
    I do want to teach History.
    With all of my Kids in High School or Beyond, My buddies and Associates have been primary source information for many papers and projects...Why, well because for the past 20 years ( a good portion of what they teach now), We have been extensions of foreign policy exercised through non-diplomatic means. Just as Teach, Ned, and few others on the forum have had a front row seat to Vietnam, I have had a front row seat to everything from Bosnia/Kosovo forward. The Guys I worked for in Stuggart, when I first came in, were all vets of Just Cause, Desert Storm, and Gothic Serpent. Because of some of my career choices, I have been exposed to many things beyond Radios. Often, I had to know the history of where I was and its relevance to why were there that day. I think we lose sight of that today. History is more than dates and names. We lose the "So What". Be able to relate the "So What" to students having to learn history helps them understand the relevance to today, and subsequently grasp and hold on too the knowledge. But, it has to be a complete History. There is more than the "winners" view. When you understand the other side, you can understand why going Nuclear in WWII was the next logical step for the US. Or, you can understand why Putin has his briefs in a wad over NATO sitting on his back step.

    However, I could teach English or Science if I had too. Maybe I will get my M.E.d in another subject so I can be dual hated. I am talking with several BOEs in the CSRA area of Georgia, however as much as they say they need male teachers, they are not very forthcoming with what they need me to do. It is like I am trying to crack the code on getting into a cult. I have talked with the Troops to Teachers folks. I am hesitant to go that route. Last time I talked with them, they told me Georgia gets to pick where I teach if they pay for my certification. I am not teaching in Downtown Atlanta...I will give them another shot though. I learned there is a Certification program through West Florida that will transfer to Georgia. Funny, the house I grew up in is literally down the road from West Florida...Like at one time, Pa-Pa's property was next to UWF's. Life is not a line, but a great circle.

    Thanks for the Feedback.
    "To have really lived, you must have almost died. To those who have fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    I applaud your desire to continue to serve others, and wish you all the best. There will be many frustrations involved, but if guys like you can't fix what is wrong with the schools, I don't know who could succeed at the job. I still believe that there is a handful of students out of every class who can be reached, but the peer pressures on them to run with the herd are very hard to overcome. The teachers who have what it takes are as rare as an honest politician, and they face similar trials, and are judged just as harshly by their peers.

    Good luck and God bless all of those who are willing to serve their country. :usa:
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    My wife was a teacher in the 70s. At that time, she was advised to get her bachelors degree, and then get a job teaching. If she wanted a Masters, get it AFTER she had started teaching.

    I don't know if that's good advice today.

    I don't know either. But if you get the ball rolling as soon as possible it gives you more experience, which gives you more money. It may take you 2-3 years to get a masters and by that time you would have three years experience. Then add to that your Masters and you could be $20,000-$30,000 ahead. So if you can handle it, do the double whammy on it. If you can put up with working and night school, you could get ahead money wise real fast, and that's the name of the game! So get after it, go for the gold! You will be making good money if you do.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    I do want to teach History. ,

    With all of my Kids in High School or Beyond, My buddies and Associates have been primary source information for many papers and projects...Why, well because for the past 20 years ( a good portion of what they teach now), We have been extensions of foreign policy exercised through non-diplomatic means. Just as Teach, Ned, and few others on the forum have had a front row seat to Vietnam, I have had a front row seat to everything from Bosnia/Kosovo forward. The Guys I worked for in Stuggart, when I first came in, were all vets of Just Cause, Desert Storm, and Gothic Serpent. Because of some of my career choices, I have been exposed to many things beyond Radios. Often, I had to know the history of where I was and its relevance to why were there that day. I think we lose sight of that today. History is more than dates and names. We lose the "So What". Be able to relate the "So What" to students having to learn history helps them understand the relevance to today, and subsequently grasp and hold on too the knowledge. But, it has to be a complete History. There is more than the "winners" view. When you understand the other side, you can understand why going Nuclear in WWII was the next logical step for the US. Or, you can understand why Putin has his briefs in a wad over NATO sitting on his back step.

    However, I could teach English or Science if I had too. Maybe I will get my M.E.d in another subject so I can be dual hated. I am talking with several BOEs in the CSRA area of Georgia, however as much as they say they need male teachers, they are not very forthcoming with what they need me to do. It is like I am trying to crack the code on getting into a cult. I have talked with the Troops to Teachers folks. I am hesitant to go that route. Last time I talked with them, they told me Georgia gets to pick where I teach if they pay for my certification. I am not teaching in Downtown Atlanta...I will give them another shot though. I learned there is a Certification program through West Florida that will transfer to Georgia. Funny, the house I grew up in is literally down the road from West Florida...Like at one time, Pa-Pa's property was next to UWF's. Life is not a line, but a great circle.

    Thanks for the Feedback.

    We need some good history teachers. We need to stop the schools from indoctrinating our kids. Educate them. Teach them what really happened and how we got here. This teaches them good lessons and the dangers our Republic faces and what a great but fragile system we have. We need good Patriotic History Teachers to get our kids off to a great start in life.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    From the perspective of having spent 30+ years in various types of public education, I can guarantee that a second career as a teacher after being in the military will be extremely rewarding, and unbelievably frustrating. The rewards will come a long way down the line, when a former student looks you up years after graduation to say "Thanks!" for being a positive influence in shaping their life. The frustration will be directly proportional to how many incompetent fools you will have to deal with, most of whom were unable to make the cut in the classroom, acquired an utterly useless advanced degree and moved into administration. An "educator" is nothing but a lard-assed bureaucrat who hasn't seen the inside of a classroom in a decade or more, and hangs onto a middle-level administrative position by brown-nosing the incompetent bureaucrat one step up the ladder. The school system operates on the "Sgt. Preston of the Yukon" dog sled business model- - - -"Unless you're the lead dog, the scenery never changes!"

    I can go into several of the better automotive shops in the Nashville area, and encounter someone who was trained by my father, myself, or my son. Two weeks ago, I ran into one of my son's students in the process of investigating a warranty claim. In another shop, the service manager and the shop foreman were both trained by my father, and the top-paid technician out on the shop floor was one of my guys. If you can stand the never-ending meddling of incompetent fools who are more interested in shuffling paper in exactly the right way instead of actually shaping young minds, go for it! You'll either love it, hate it, of a combination of the two situations. I survived by routinely reminding the bosses that I could actually go get a real job that paid approximately twice the money anytime I wanted. Most of them were astute enough to leave me alone!
    Jerry
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,911 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    ..............If you can stand the never-ending meddling of incompetent fools who are more interested in shuffling paper in exactly the right way instead of actually shaping young minds, go for it! You'll either love it, hate it, of a combination of the two situations...........
    Although I can't speak for the Sarge, he may be experiencing exactly the same thing in his military career, and if he is able to tolerate it will be perfectly suited for his new one.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    You will make a good teacher. It doesn't pay enough for what they do. My oldest daughter teaches HS AP classes and has a Masters from FSU which pays a little more. She has to continuously keep taking more classes to get certified to teach more subjects and stay updated. She likes it because her students want to be there and learn to proceed to college.

    She spends a lot of nights and weekends doing things for her classes like grading papers and writing lesson plans and class projects. The school district, the school and the principal can all influence how you like the job.

    I know quite a few GIs who retired and went into teaching. You will most likely need a second income to supplement your Army retirement, plus you will be relatively young (40s) when you retire.


    They always need good teachers, but be prepared to cross all the hurdles they put up from the School Boards and Govt interference. But after being in the military most will be a breeze to overcome, put up with and get on with teaching the kids.

    She went through teaching jobs at elementary and middle schools before getting where she is now. So set your goals and work toward them, sorta like getting promoted in the Army, different assignments or earning a qualification/skill and you will succeed.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
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