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Barbecue thoughts.... beef vs. pork

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  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,877 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    That is strange... But then again, I can't remember any of the cattlemen I know barbecuing anything. It was either grilled steak or chicken fried steak.
    Maybe that's not a Florida thing, then? Maybe it's like Tennmike said. After taking days to raise them, they don't want to spend hours to barbecue them?
    I'm just here for snark.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    and BBQ brisket. Which beats the hell out of pork. Period, end of story.
    Is pulled pork good? Yes. The stuff Jerry fixed this weekend was some of the BEST I've ever had.
    But it ain't brisket.

    Damn! There's Hope for ya boy!!! It do make good Barbecue. But I don't limit myself. I does like some pork on the pit too.

    I'll barbecue about anything. Well almost. A guy at work brought out some BBQed Rattle snake once. The more I chewed the bigger it got. I like Fried Rattlesnake. It's good. But BBQed? It don't get hot enough for my tastes. And it's mushy. My mind can play tricks on me sometimes. But I think I've BBQed about everything else, including Nilgay.

    My nephew's specialty is Pork Loin. It's ok but a bit dry for my tastes. I'd rather have a BBQed Ham or shoulder. And on wild hog any part is great BBQ. But here in Texas Beef Brisket or front shoulder is king. But that doesn't mean it's the only thing I'll BBQ or eat that's BBQed. I'll eat damn near anything BBQed, but no more Rattlesnake please.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    I use a vinegar/garlic/kosher salt/cayenne pepper injection marinade, and let the meat soak it up overnight, then use an aluminum roaster pan during the smoking process instead of letting the drippings fall into the smoker. The meat gets a liberal coat of daughter Debby's "Dangerous Rub" before smoking, also. Once the meat reaches 200 degrees internal temp, I debone and "pull" it with a couple of forks, and pour some of the drippings back over the meat to keep it moist.

    Pulled pork will keep for several months in the freezer, bagged up into 1 or 2 pound portions and vacuum sealed. Thaw out a package and warm it up by either simmering the sealed bag in 200 degree water, or nuke it for a couple of minutes.
    Jerry

    Yeah, I'm from Texas, and YEAH, I eat Beef Brisket, but good pulled pork I put next to anything. It's good. And again, I don't limit myself as far as BBQ goes, cept Rattlesnake.

    I'll eat it but I think BBQed Gator is a waste of gator meat. It's good, but there's just too many other things that are good BBQed and Fried Gator tail, like Fried cat fish, is manna from heaven.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    That is strange... But then again, I can't remember any of the cattlemen I know barbecuing anything. It was either grilled steak or chicken fried steak.

    After raising the aggravating 'mass murder on their minds' critters, steak grilled or chicken fried IS sweet revenge.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Maybe that's not a Florida thing, then? Maybe it's like Tennmike said. After taking days to raise them, they don't want to spend hours to barbecue them?

    Grilled or chicken fried steaks are quick. Barbecuing takes time. Cowboys ain't got time to waste on that mess. About the time you are getting ready to pull the barbecue and eat, the danged cattle will have broken through a fence and departed for parts unknown. Or done something equally stupid. I hate cattle unless it's a hunk of steak or other tender cut on my plate, or a big juicy bacon cheeseburger.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    Most of the poor-boy cattlemen I know say they can't afford to eat their own beef. :jester:
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,043 Senior Member
    Maybe that's not a Florida thing, then? Maybe it's like Tennmike said. After taking days to raise them, they don't want to spend hours to barbecue them?

    Kind of like mechanics having broken down, beat up cars? After spending time working on cars all day, you don't want to do that on your spare time
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    Most of the poor-boy cattlemen I know say they can't afford to eat their own beef. :jester:

    Well, there's that angle, too, to, two, tu, also. Been there and done that. Sometimes cash money in the pocket can offset the pinto beans, taters, and cornpone eaten instead of the steak or BBQ you'd like.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Back when the kids were growing up, one of our calves would keel over and die, and fall into the freezer about once a year. An 800-lb. calf on the hoof would produce about 400 lbs. of processed meat- - - -at a cost of about $100.00 for slaughtering and processing, that was steak, roasts, hamburger, and all the other goodies at an average cost of 25 cents a pound! It was not economically feasible to sell the calf and buy beef from the store! That "dead" calf was written off the taxes as a farming loss, also.
    Jerry
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,118 Senior Member
    While were on th subject of cooking stuff...has anyone ever done deep fried steaks?...back in Kansas, a couple of times a year someone would throw a "steak fry"...there would be a huge caldron filled with boiling oil and you would pick your steak, season it to your tastes , stick it on a (clean) pitchfork and plunge it in til you achieved your personal idea of doneness.....really interesting, not greasy ...lot of work though....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Never done deep fried steaks, but I've used a small pot of hot oil to do strips of lesser cuts of beef. It's pretty good. I've participated in the same big cast iron kettle of screaming hot oil to fry chicken. The seasoned and floured chikkin parts are put in a big wire basket on a pole and dunked into the oil. When the parts/pieces float to the top, then they're done. Basket is removed, chikkin parts dumped on a piece of cheesecloth, and forks start flying to stab the stuff. Crispety crunchety on the outside, tender meat on the inside, and it isn't greasy. The hot oil seals in the natural juices, and the light breading seals out most all the oil. I've never seen/heard of the chikkin frying in a big cast iron pot thing done anywhere but the South. And it's done for catfish fillets, too.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    Sometimes I buy chuck steak, cut it into strips and fry it for steak fingers. It's a good way to eat cheap, tough steaks - very tasty, and tender, when cooked that way.
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