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Getting the caribou home?

tealmantealman New MemberPosts: 10 New Member
Assuming my upcoming caribou hunt is successful, anyone have experience on getting some or all of the meat home? And the horns? We fly out of Fairbanks.

Replies

  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    I have heard of guys spraying their Alaska kills down with citric acid solution before they pack it up. Supposedly, it keeps the meat good even at moderate temps. As for the horns, I believe the airlines will allow you to wrap them as fragile cargo, but make a few phone calls before you go that route.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,161 Senior Member
    I'm relatively sure your outfitter has done this before....many times. It's part of what you're paying him for.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 5,050 Senior Member
    I don't know if the airlines still allow this as the last time I flew meat out was 98 or 99 , we got those cheap Styrofoam coolers, doubled bagged them with game bags, filled the coolers with dry ice, duct taped them and filled out a voucher , carry a roll of tape just in case they want to open and check them.

    Since you have time before you go call the airlines and find out what the requirements are, another option is call UPS and Fed Ex.

    The horns can usually just be wrapped up.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    IIRC I over heard out of state hunters at the game processer I use setting up his stuff for overnight express shipping. I'm sure an outfitter working out of Fairbanks will have access logistical information and support.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    When we fish in Alaska, we have the processor vacuum pack and seal the fillets and store it in their freezer until we are ready to head back to Michigan. The morning of our flight, they will pack them in styofoam lined boxes and we go to pick them up. From there, at least in Anchorage, the airport will let you store your stuff in a freezer there if you need to. We take the boxes on the plane as checked baggage. Keep it under 50 pounds per box to avoid having to pay additional fees.

    Regardless, once out of the freezer you got about 36 hours to get that box home and in your own freezer before it thaws.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    I don't know if the airlines still allow this as the last time I flew meat out was 98 or 99 , we got those cheap Styrofoam coolers, doubled bagged them with game bags, filled the coolers with dry ice, duct taped them and filled out a voucher , carry a roll of tape just in case they want to open and check them.

    Since you have time before you go call the airlines and find out what the requirements are, another option is call UPS and Fed Ex.

    The horns can usually just be wrapped up.

    JAY

    The foam cooler was how I did it leaving Montana. The processors there had a steady supply from the vet down the block, who gave him vaccination coolers used to ship shots for farm animals. He packed up all of the frozen meat in there just before I left and I took 70+ lbs. home on the plane. I didn't even need dry ice with that much frozen meat and it wasn't even close to thawed when I landed hours later. You can pack dry ice if needed, but DEFINITELY ask the airline the legal quantity. There is a strict limit to how much weight of dry ice you can pack in the cooler since it can cause a suffocation hazard, especially for pets in the cargo compartment.
    early wrote: »
    IIRC I over heard out of state hunters at the game processer I use setting up his stuff for overnight express shipping. I'm sure an outfitter working out of Fairbanks will have access logistical information and support.

    It's brutally expensive to ship that quantity of meat express overnight. It can be arranged, but for a critter the size of a caribou, I wouldn't be shocked to see a $1K shipping bill out of Alaska.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Ouch! $$$$
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    Ouch! $$$$

    Believe me, I've been burned by overnight meat shipping costs. In some cases, it's not terrible. When it's cold enough out, you can safely have it 2-day shipped which is WAY cheaper than overnight. When it's hot outside like it can be early season, all bets are off. I got scorched with a nearly $500 bill for shipping ONE early season buck and one small doe worth of meat to my place from Maryland. That was the last time I let that happen. You are way better off paying $100- $200 in overweight baggage fees to the airlines bringing it home with you on the plane than letting UPS or FedEx pack/ship your meat overnight.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Maybe the guys I heard were shipping antlers.

    The warm weather is one a the reasons I rush what get into town for processing. That way it's packaged and froze for transport.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    My elk was shipped to my door for $150, or so. My processor shipped it for me. They bought a new Coleman Extreme 5 day cooler, packed it with dry ice, taped the lid shut and shipped it standard UPS.
    5 days later, I got my elk. Frozen solid, just like it came out of the freezer.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    That's a great way to do it. Some of these places insist on overnight, even when it's not necessary. A 5-day Coleman absolutely works when you have the quantity of meat in it, especially when you add dry ice into the equation.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    My elk was shipped to my door for $150, or so. My processor shipped it for me. They bought a new Coleman Extreme 5 day cooler, packed it with dry ice, taped the lid shut and shipped it standard UPS.
    5 days later, I got my elk. Frozen solid, just like it came out of the freezer.

    Man! That's cheap. Where were you shipping it from?

    BTW, Coleman makes some great coolers and they're a lot cheaper than Yettis. We used to have one my dad bought back in the 70s. That thing wasn't anything special but would keep ice really well for 4 days in the summer, that's down here where we have Real summer.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,615 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Man! That's cheap. Where were you shipping it from?
    .

    Seriously?

    Colorado.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    Seriously?

    Colorado.

    Ah ok, but that's still not bad.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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