Interested in price you pay for the hunting

TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula MemberPosts: 229 Member
Hi all!

As few of you know I live on the other side of the pond, in Finland. I'm curious how much does it cost to hunt in US or Canada? Or anywhere else? If you are a "common hunter" what is the price for the roe deer, deer or moose ?
Here in Finland the right to hunt is tied to owning the land where you hunt. If you don't own any land suited for hunting you can try your luck and try to become a member in a hunting club. It's very hard to be accepted as a member with out bringing some land with you to hunting club.
I'm on my fast lane to one hunting club about 50 miles from my home as my father is already a member. Perhaps in a few years I'll be accepted as a member and will be allowed to hunt as myself not as the son of my father. Perhaps not. But meanwhile I get a chance to participate to driven deer hunts, hopefully for the driven moose hunt and I'm allowed to stalk deer with my father. If I shoot a deer it will cost me 20 euros (about 25 dollars...)

Roe deer I shot last week didn't cost me anything else but our mandatory yearly "Hunter's license" that costs 30 euros (35 dollars). It was free because it was shot from our own land where we live. I'm not allowed to shoot deer here as it requires a minimum of 500 hectares (1 235 acres) of land. Moose requires double of that to be hunted.

I would like to hear something about the costs you have to pay to hunt.
To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
-William Blake-

Replies

  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,342 Senior Member
    In the US, the cost of hunting can vary tremendously from state to state. When I lived in Wisconsin, there was lots of public land available and there were lots of people using it. With a nine day deer season you didn't have time to spend too much besides the cost of a license and lodging for a weekend or two. When I lived in Texas, there was little public land available and I paid 1000.00 a year for a lease and spent the weekends in a tent. I was lucky to harvest two deer a season so overall, it wasn't too unreasonable unless you broke it down to cost per pound. When I hunted in Alabama, I belonged to a club that had around 3000 acres available for a limit of eight members. That was a lot of land but it came with a price. The membership was 3500.00 a year and that covered use of the land year round and an apartment in the bunk house, and all utilities. I averaged going to the camp 32 weekends a year and you could factor in another 100.00 a weekend for feed, gas, and groceries along with the 275.00 non-resident license. That seems like a lot but when you consider the private apartment that was included and the huge abundance of game from deer, turkeys, ducks, squirrels, bobcats, and coyotes, if you really liked to hunt, it was paradise. The deer season was around three and a half months long if you bow hunted and the limits are three bucks total, and two does a day for the entire season! It was rare to sit in a stand and not see several deer each time. I don't belong to a club at the moment but the back of our ten acres butts up to a little over a thousand acres of woods and the neighbor tells us that the previous owner shot a few nice deer from it. There are remnants of a tree stand in an oak tree next to the house. I plan to put a feeder and camera on the back of the property in the near future to see what's back there.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,141 Senior Member
    Hunting here in America is very different from one area to another. Each state (50 of them) has its own laws and regulations concerning licensing procedures and fees. In general, where the population is more concentrated and the political climate reflects the socialist viewpoint, hunting is discouraged and the cost is driven up artificially. In the western states where huge tracts of land are privately owned, landowners have learned they can charge outrageous fees for the privilege of hunting on their property, and just as things are where you live, money and privilege buys much better hunting opportunities.

    I own a small tract of land, about 100 acres, in the southeastern USA, Tennessee. I hunt almost exclusively on my own property, at virtually no cost, even the state license fees are waived for landowners here. I do have to abide by the seasons and bag limits for game which are set by the state, but they are pretty liberal. One of the few perks of being 70+ years old is a state-issued lifetime hunting/fishing license which allows me to hunt statewide at virtually no cost, as long as I have a landowner's permission to hunt, or I an hunting or fishing on state-owned land or water. Thanks to a recovery project on white tail deer that was begun in the early 1950's, Tennessee has a huge deer herd, so much so that in certain areas of the state including where I live, we can take 3 does a day over a season that spans about three months, for population control. We can take 3 mature bucks a year during that same season. Other parts of the country do not have such liberal harvest limits.

    The harvest of small game such as squirrels, rabbits, quail, dove, pheasant, grouse, and other similar animals is also regulated as to open seasons and bag limits, with the species, legal methods of hunting, and bag limits changing from one state to another, and occasionally changing from one geographic area of a state to another. Some animals in some places are considered vermin, with no closed season and no bag limits. Feral swine are considered to be vermin in many areas, along with burrowing rodents such as prairie dogs and woodchucks, and crows and a few other bird species can be hunted year round with no limit in a lot of areas.

    In general, the more rural an area is, the less the cost to hunt is likely to be, especially if a lot of public land is available. I don't know of any public area that charges a trophy fee for a harvested animal, although some privately-owned hunting preservers do charge for guided hunts, with the cost of raising and managing the quarry being factored into the cost of the hunt. Overall, America is fairly hunter-friendly, except for the major population centers. That's just another reason I prefer to be as far away from those places as possible!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,268 Senior Member
    Hi all!

    As few of you know I live on the other side of the pond, in Finland. I'm curious how much does it cost to hunt in US or Canada? Or anywhere else? If you are a "common hunter" what is the price for the roe deer, deer or moose ?
    Here in Finland the right to hunt is tied to owning the land where you hunt. If you don't own any land suited for hunting you can try your luck and try to become a member in a hunting club. It's very hard to be accepted as a member with out bringing some land with you to hunting club.
    I'm on my fast lane to one hunting club about 50 miles from my home as my father is already a member. Perhaps in a few years I'll be accepted as a member and will be allowed to hunt as myself not as the son of my father. Perhaps not. But meanwhile I get a chance to participate to driven deer hunts, hopefully for the driven moose hunt and I'm allowed to stalk deer with my father. If I shoot a deer it will cost me 20 euros (about 25 dollars...)

    Roe deer I shot last week didn't cost me anything else but our mandatory yearly "Hunter's license" that costs 30 euros (35 dollars). It was free because it was shot from our own land where we live. I'm not allowed to shoot deer here as it requires a minimum of 500 hectares (1 235 acres) of land. Moose requires double of that to be hunted.

    I would like to hear something about the costs you have to pay to hunt.

    Depends on where you hunt. Here in Texas there's a lot of private land and if you pay someone to lease a part of their land to hunt on it depends on how much the owner wants to charge you. I pay right at $1000 USD per year. It's a pretty good lease, but if it was better I may be paying as much as $5000 per year.

    Also, in Texas, unless you pay a lot of money to hunt on a big ranch, in most areas of the state you're going to be limited to White Tail Deer and Hogs. There are areas where you can find exotics such as Nilgai and Axis deer and such, but that's in very isolated areas which are normally next to big ranches.

    I went on a Nilgai hunt down on the intercoastal Water Way around Kingsville which is south of Corpus Christi a few miles. The nilgai get out of the fences of the King and Kennedy ranches and swim to the spoil islands along the Intercoastal Canal. On most of those spoil banks, which are islands created when the canal was dug many years ago, it is legal to hunt because it is public land. There are a few of those islands that are privately owned by the surrounding ranches however, so they are posted land (Only huntable with permission from the land owner).

    Here in the U.S. you can hunt on what is called Tide Lands, which is land normally covered by mean high tide (Hurricane Storm Surges don't count. If they did, it might include half the county. 15-20 foot of water can cover a large amount of normally dry land down here on the coast).

    Where I used to hunt up the country about 65 miles north from here, it cost me $250 per year, but that was a one buck county. Now, they're essentially all one buck counties. You can't shoot but one forked horn deer a year here.

    Now up in the North West in places like Colorado there is a lot of public land which is normally free to hunt on. There the expense lies in guide fees and license provided you get drawn to shoot a certain animal. And that can be as expensive or more than leasing private land down here. Of course, for a Texan or most other southern folks, if you want to kill an elk or moose you're probably going to have to go to one of these NW states because in most places here in Texas, we have a chronic shortage of such animals. There are a few Elk in West Texas and there are Mule Deer, but that's a very big place and it's probably like looking for a needle in a hay stack to find one.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,226 Senior Member
    That's kind of like asking how long is a piece of string.

    It depends.

    I live in the state of Colorado, which has a lot of public land (national forest service, bureau of land management, state managed properties, etc). There's also a fair amount of private land.

    To hunt on public land, all it costs is the price of a license and your expenses. I killed the elk in my avatar about 10 miles from my house. I think the license cost me about $40, and my hunting expenses were not much. But, when hunting public land, the odds of success are not very high (for elk, about 20%), so you get what you pay for.

    I've taken antelope (pronghorn) on several private properties. A lot of ranchers in the eastern part of the state don't like them, and will let you hunt for free. For example, I took the antelope shown below on private land about 100 miles from where I live, and didn't have to pay anything.

    FrankenGoatII-Web.jpg

    But, not all hunting is like that. The better private land deer and elk properties are managed by outfitters, and one can expect to pay from $7500 to $12,500 (maybe more) for a quality guided hunt. Guided hunts on public land are less. Guided antelope hunts usually average about $2,000. A top quality guided mule deer hunt on private land may cost $8,000.

    In other states, such as Texas, where public land is scarce, prices are much higher.

    BTW, what do you pay?
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,162 Senior Member
    Minnesota resident deer license is $31 US.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula Member Posts: 229 Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    That's kind of like asking how long is a piece of string.

    It depends.

    I live in the state of Colorado, which has a lot of public land (national forest service, bureau of land management, state managed properties, etc). There's also a fair amount of private land.

    To hunt on public land, all it costs is the price of a license and your expenses. I killed the elk in my avatar about 10 miles from my house. I think the license cost me about $40, and my hunting expenses were not much. But, when hunting public land, the odds of success are not very high (for elk, about 20%), so you get what you pay for.

    I've taken antelope (pronghorn) on several private properties. A lot of ranchers in the eastern part of the state don't like them, and will let you hunt for free. For example, I took the antelope shown below on private land about 100 miles from where I live, and didn't have to pay anything.

    FrankenGoatII-Web.jpg

    But, not all hunting is like that. The better private land deer and elk properties are managed by outfitters, and one can expect to pay from $7500 to $12,500 (maybe more) for a quality guided hunt. Guided hunts on public land are less. Guided antelope hunts usually average about $2,000. A top quality guided mule deer hunt on private land may cost $8,000.

    In other states, such as Texas, where public land is scarce, prices are much higher.

    BTW, what do you pay?
    But as I don't know how long strings you have there I have to ask :)

    I pay nothing for the roe deers as I hunt them in my own property. Deer will be 20 euros (~25$) when shot. Moose will be free in a driven hunt but I won't be getting any meat as I will be quest in there.
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
    -William Blake-
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,376 Senior Member
    Pennsylvania resident adult lic. is 20.90. That gives you a antlered deer tag (whitetail) a spring gobbler tag, and a fall turkey tag. It also covers all small game, predator and varmint hunting. Bobcat, fishers, otter and elk are the only things not covered by that. Additionally, you would have to buy a migratory bird stamp for geese and such.
    I purchase a Muzzle loader lic. for 11.90, which allows me to hunt the flintlock deer season. I also purchase a antlerless deer permit for 6.90 and can use that in doe season or the early muzzle loader doe season in Oct.

    I have 52ac of my own and it has produced deer for me and the family pretty well since I got the place. PA has a lot of land owned by the game commission which was bought with hunter dollars and can be used as long as you bought a lic. There is a small one, under 500ac about 3 miles away from my house. Other than that, leasing is showing up in a few places, but mostly you can hunt where you get permission to be.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,444 Senior Member
    A resident basic hunting tag in Texas is $25-ish bucks. That gives you two bucks and I think four does (whitetail deer), a couple turkeys, and the ability to shoot as many imported species (axis, nilgai, sika, etc...) as you want. Pigs require no license, and can take as many as you want in any way you want.

    As someone mentioned, the rub is land access. I am blessed to have a small that I have year-round access to for a very cheap price. I know some people that pay thousands of dollars for just a few months access. If you don't own or lease land, you are down to the kindness of others to let you hunt on their land.

    Seasons for whitetail is from November to January (in my part of TX) with a late spike/ doe season stretching into the middle of January
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,407 Senior Member
    I bought a lifetime license 31 years ago and it paid for itself in 10 years; so, now all I have to buy is a $10 Base license if I wish to hunt at MCAS
    Cherry Point and a $26.50 federal Duck Stamp [migratory bird stamp].

    Many landowners allow free hunting and we have extensive National Forrest close by.
    We get to shoot 6 deer, a bear, and 2 turkeys in this area of the state
    some people shoot all that.

    I mostly hunt small game and ducks though I get the pocket card free each year for big game.

    The same license I have if bought today would cost $675 for a resident and $1550 for a non resident. The yearly license fee is $65.

    There are cheaper licenses yearly if you want to limit yourself to only a portion of the hunting and fishing available.
    This message has been deleted
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,287 Senior Member
    The guys have explained the "American System" pretty well...there is one interesting twist in my world. Since my wife is a Native American and a tribal member, things are a little different...When we lived in Kansas she got her hunting license at no cost but still had to buy her deer and turkey tags. Here in Michigan, she gets a tribal license that includes hunting, fishing, trapping ,gathering , spring and fall turkey tags and 5 deer tags...2 any deer and three antlerless tags for $5.00. Only hitch is, her license is only good in "ceded lands" but that includes a large part of the state.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,277 Senior Member
    Pennsylvania resident adult lic. is 20.90. That gives you a antlered deer tag (whitetail) a spring gobbler tag, and a fall turkey tag. It also covers all small game, predator and varmint hunting. Bobcat, fishers, otter and elk are the only things not covered by that. Additionally, you would have to buy a migratory bird stamp for geese and such.
    I purchase a Muzzle loader lic. for 11.90, which allows me to hunt the flintlock deer season. I also purchase a antlerless deer permit for 6.90 and can use that in doe season or the early muzzle loader doe season in Oct.

    I have 52ac of my own and it has produced deer for me and the family pretty well since I got the place. PA has a lot of land owned by the game commission which was bought with hunter dollars and can be used as long as you bought a lic. There is a small one, under 500ac about 3 miles away from my house. Other than that, leasing is showing up in a few places, but mostly you can hunt where you get permission to be.

    Yea, PA is pretty easy. You get all of the above and can add up to 3 doe tags for 6.90 ea. Pa goes by WMU's (wildlife management units). There are so many doe tags assigned to each unit with first come first served. I added up the total for doe tags for PA this year and it was roughly 900,000. There are plenty around. PA is split into archery (first) and then firearms seasons. The archery license is around $16 I believe.


    https://www.pa.wildlifelicense.com/deeravail.php
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 672 Senior Member
    Argh, stupid page timed out and ate my lengthy post. :bang:

    The only terrestrial animals considered "worthy" of game regulations are birds, Ducks, swans, quails, pheasants and pukeko, a licence for them is $92 NZD a year and the Season runs from May to July/August generally with a few special weekends that are earlier.

    Rusa, Red, Sika, Sambar, Whitetail and Fallow deer can be hunted year round on public and private land along with Wapiti, Himalayan Tahr, Chamois, Goats, Pigs, Rabbits, Hares and Possums.
    They are classified as pests along with Turkeys, Peafowl, Rooks and Magpies and may be killed by any humane means on private land, on public land you can't use a rimfire or 22 hornet (officialdom is paranoid about the shooting of native birds).

    NZ's hunting culture has it good points and bad points. Personally I would like to see our deer herds respected and protected, by being given seasons and maybe age and gender restrictions, but I can't see it ever happening. Access to hunting on public land as well as private is generally good though and mostly free or a nominal amount at worst on public ($5 fee for maps etc. on some special blocks).

    Orchidman, one of the other EnZed members on the forum, is a Fish and Game Ranger, he might chime in and add or clarify more.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,044 Senior Member
    I hunt on 310 acres (125 hectars) of family owned land 30mi (48km) away from here. So I sleep in my own bed, then drive up to where I hunt, then drive home.

    So other than the fuel costs, and the cost of fertilizer & seed for my food plots, and ammunition, the only cost is the $26 state hunting license
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula Member Posts: 229 Member
    Thanks for the answers. So it seems that you can hunt there pretty cheaply. If you live in certain areas...

    How about the opportunities to hunt? Are there a lot of public areas to hunt? Or do you have to drive for hours and hours? I had an picture in my mind that US is 99.99% private owned and you have to pay thousands of dollars to hunt. Unless you happened to be land owner... :)

    I'm little jealous here. Our country is mostly very sparsely populated country. But it's pretty hard to get opportunities to hunt here. Unless you own some land and can join the hunting club with your land. Or then you have born into some community where you can join your father's/grandfather's path to hunting club. If you are an "outsider" in your county/village (moved in in your adult years etc.) it's very hard to break in into the hunting circles.

    Moose and deer are pretty much impossible to hunt without being a member in hunting club as it has to be area bigger than 1 235 acres (for the deer) and 2470 acres (for the moose) even to apply a license from local game management district.

    At the same time hunting clubs are complaining that the hobby will slowly die because of the high average age among the hunters in those clubs and at the same time they won't be accepting new members. Unless you have a few hundred acres of land as a dowry for the club, of course...

    Luckily I can hunt roe deer at my home as we live in a tiny 17 acres "island". The fun part is that those roes come here through the forests where the owner has leased hunting rights to a club that refused to take me as a member even as I have lived here for over eight years :)
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
    -William Blake-
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,287 Senior Member
    Finding a place to hunt in the U.S. can be problematic...but we own five acres that's connected to the Manistee National Forest...which is nearly a million acres of public land
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Tons of public and private land here to hunt. Depending on season, game and what you're using to hunt with, its fairly cheap to take game from small to large. No need in expensive clubs if that's what you choose either. Also depends on how much land you wish to share with other hunters if you're in state parks and other public land.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 14,344 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Finding a place to hunt in the U.S. can be problematic...but we own five acres that's connected to the Manistee National Forest...which is nearly a million acres of public land
    Me too. I also have 5 acres attached to Manistee National Forest. Jayhawker and I both live in Michigan. To put that in perspective, Finland is has about 30% more land (133,000 square miles) than our state does (96,000 square miles). Of the 96,000 square miles in Michigan, over 25% is freely accessible for the public to hunt and fish on.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,158 Senior Member
    As a resident of Texas, I spend $57 for a combination license that entitles me to hunt any legal game and fish in fresh water for a year. This includes migratory birds, deer, feral hogs, coyotes, squirrel, rabbit - basically anything that is not a protected species. That is the easy part.

    The hard part (in recent years) is finding a land owner who will allow hunting on his property, without a significant fee. In my area, the proven deer hunting locales are along major rivers and streams, and a hunter will usually pay about $2000 per person to hunt it, and that may only be for the two months of hunting season. The price goes up from there, for the really good places.

    Personally, I have never been willing to pay that much, while many others will, so my hunting has been sporadic over the last few years. I did find a place for this year, for much less than that, but it is not river bottom land, so the deer are likely to be smaller, and fewer. Still, it's much better than not hunting, and I'm not really a trophy hunter, anyway - I actually like to eat them.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,000 Senior Member
    Wyoming is 50%+ Federal lands...BLM and National Forest ground. Other than my license fees (which are cheap) I hunt public ground open to anyone for free. We have Moose/Bighorn sheep/Mountain goat tags available in a lottery system. Or Elk/Mule deer/Whitetail deer/Antelope at reasonable fees. It sounds like hunting is a rich man's sport where you are, unless one is well connected. Good luck.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,570 Senior Member
    waipapa13 wrote: »
    Argh, stupid page timed out and ate my lengthy post. :bang:

    The only terrestrial animals considered "worthy" of game regulations are birds, Ducks, swans, quails, pheasants and pukeko, a licence for them is $92 NZD a year and the Season runs from May to July/August generally with a few special weekends that are earlier.

    Rusa, Red, Sika, Sambar, Whitetail and Fallow deer can be hunted year round on public and private land along with Wapiti, Himalayan Tahr, Chamois, Goats, Pigs, Rabbits, Hares and Possums.
    They are classified as pests along with Turkeys, Peafowl, Rooks and Magpies and may be killed by any humane means on private land, on public land you can't use a rimfire or 22 hornet (officialdom is paranoid about the shooting of native birds).

    NZ's hunting culture has it good points and bad points. Personally I would like to see our deer herds respected and protected, by being given seasons and maybe age and gender restrictions, but I can't see it ever happening. Access to hunting on public land as well as private is generally good though and mostly free or a nominal amount at worst on public ($5 fee for maps etc. on some special blocks).

    Orchidman, one of the other EnZed members on the forum, is a Fish and Game Ranger, he might chime in and add or clarify more.

    You nailed it my friend.

    The only thing I would add is that it is also legal to spotlight all the animals you listed in your second paragraph.........but only on private land and with the owners permission. And you can shoot as many as you want.

    Oh, and if you want to hunt with suppressed firearms, you may.............All it will cost you is the price of your suppressor and the cost of getting the barrel threaded.

    Ooops, forgot about Canada geese. They are now classed as a pest here and can be shot year round with any caliber of rifle/shotgun.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,310 Senior Member
    I live in the Idaho panhandle. I buy the "Sportsman Package" license for $124.25. It includes fishing and the basic hunting license for upland birds and small game. Additionally I get elk, deer (mule or whitetail), black bear, cougar, wolf, and turkey tags.

    Idaho's panhandle is 75% public land. I live on 10 wooded acres within the Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, which is 1.6M acres of public land.

    Hunting access is very easy and the population here is low density, so pressure/competition is fairly light if you get away from the forestry roads.
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,376 Senior Member
    The US is hardly 99% populated.

    In Pennsylvania, for hunting, there is National forest (Allegheny National forest is 801 sq miles) State parks, state forest, and Gamelands (@ 1.5M ac) and private property.
    Gamelands map http://pagame.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=98bd698a3d194a5797ce4c80ef34bbcb

    And FYI, there is a antler restriction on whitetail buck. It must have a minimum of 3 points over the brow tine to be legal for a adult to take. Junior hunters can take a buck with a spike at least 3 inches long.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,000 Senior Member
    CaliFFL wrote: »
    I live in the Idaho panhandle. I buy the "Sportsman Package" license for $124.25. It includes fishing and the basic hunting license for upland birds and small game. Additionally I get elk, deer (mule or whitetail), black bear, cougar, wolf, and turkey tags.

    Idaho's panhandle is 75% public land. I live on 10 wooded acres within the Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, which is 1.6M acres of public land.

    Hunting access is very easy and the population here is low density, so pressure/competition is fairly light if you get away from the forestry roads.

    I get the "Old Fart" freebee package that Wyoming offers to residents. Over 65 and a resident over 30 years. Free Small Game/Game bird and Fishing.
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