Home Main Category Hunting

What's the hardest you've everr worked to retrieve downed game?

2»

Replies

  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    In the early 80's I got an invite to hunt a friends land near Avoca on the Wisconsin river. On the second day, I was walking along a creek bed along some corn stubble and a small eight point jumped up out of the frozen creek and just trotted out into the corn stubble and stopped, after dispatching him and field dressing him, I decided that the easiest route back to camp was to head out to the road and drag him along the shoulder for the two miles or so back. After a few hundred yards through the snow, I decided to bury him in the snow next to the road and walk back to my land cruiser and just drive back to get him. I was young and in pretty good shape but dragging that thing through a foot of snow ate my lunch.
    Another time about ten years ago, I got an invite to hunt on a friends lease in Alabama and they had a few deer that they wanted culled. One was about a four year old "unicorn" with a nub on one side and a small spike on the other and within about the first hour of sitting in a stand he walked out in front of me. I was sitting over a sloped greenfield with a steeply sloped patch of woods on the far side of it. Of course after I hit him, he stumbled down the hill through the woods. I had to drag him about eighty yards or so up a pretty steep hill to get him to my truck and I was gasping and wheezing by the time I got him loaded. After I got him back to camp and explained where I shot him, my friends informed me that there was a road about twenty feet downhill from where I was and I just couldn't see it through the trees.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,026 Senior Member
    Getting out the elk in JerryBobCo's avatar. I don't have even a close second. That was a really long day. One of the best ever...but really long.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    I had it figured out, at about your age. Unfortunately, feeling the need for 'expediency' still trumps common sense, all too often. I still lift things that I should not, because I always have, and because I still can. But there is a price to pay for it, and I usually end up paying more than I intended.

    It's kinda like when you are 20, or so, and have such a monumental hangover that you swear you will never let it happen again. By Friday night, you have forgotten about it, and it takes another couple of years to refuse the temptation on a regular basis. Even then, you may backslide occasionally, for several more years.
    Y'all all know I'm an alcoholic and haven't drunk in years. Well a few months back I slipped for a few days. I had a sip of beer and got the idea I could somehow handle it now. So I said to myself I would just allow a small amount at night. I started off drinking like half a beer. Then after a few nights that was up to a whole beer, but when I ended up at three beers and climbing I noticed something I had forgotten about. Hangovers. I was feeling a little bad in the mornings. This got my attention. I had told myself I never wanted to have the shakes and that foggy headache again. So I ceased on the spot. I just had to remember why I quit in the first place. This surprised me that I could stop so quick after I had fallen off the horse. Anyway back to the subject at hand.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,459 Senior Member
    Packing elk out on framepacks way back in some steep territory
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    That last bear I shot and only wounded....the one where I broke the flint and had to change it out as well as reload :yikes:. Field dressed and drug down off the highest Mountain in Georgia, almost a half mile through laurel thickets and ravines: Told my buddy helping me: I ain't gonna ever do this again....and I haven't and will not! Damn thing weighed 237 pounds, gutted!
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    I heard a story once about a deer shot in the Louisiana delta area with a .270 caliber musket. They sent a couple guys named Lewis and Clark to find it. I don't think it was recovered.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    .270's have never had much of a reputation, have they :jester:
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,396 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    It's kinda like when you are 20, or so, and have such a monumental hangover that you swear you will never let it happen again. By noon, you have forgotten about it, and it takes another couple of decades to refuse the temptation on a daily basis. Even then, you may backslide occasionally, till 50.
    FIFY
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • tealmantealman New Member Posts: 10 New Member
    Physically was a similar situation to yours. On my birthday in 2000 I shot my first elk (cow) with my muzzleloader in southern Colorado. It was about 2 miles from camp-downhill with lots of deadfall and rocks. My younger brother sent me back to camp for the buggy (9am) but forgot to mention how to get there and I thought I knew. It didn't take long to realize I was lost. I didn't panic since we were on a plateau and there was a fence pretty well around the whole place. It took a couple hours to find the fence and get back to camp. I headed back to kill sight - no problem getting back. About the time we started back with elk, I ran out of gas. I had lived in Louisiana all my life and we were now at 12,000 feet - oxygen depravation set in. I could hardly walk much less help with the elk. Fortunately our other hunting partner showed up and help my brother get the elk back to camp - they beat me as I had to stop every 50 yards to breathe! Learned several lessons that day 1. don't get lost 2. shoot elk closer to camp!

    A unique retrieve was on a swamp rabbit while wood duck hunting down a slough. He jumped and ran in front of me and I shot at him. He ran into a briar patch and I wasn't sure I had hit him. I did find a little piece of fur and some blood spots (can you tracking a rabbit?) that led into the big briar patch. I love fried swamp rabbit so I proceeded on my hands and knees under the briars. Fortunately the carhart jacket was tough and allowed me to get through the briars albeit at a slow pace. After 50 yards or so I found the rabbit - dead with one #6 shot in his lungs. Had a great feast and good memory.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    tealman wrote: »
    Physically was a similar situation to yours. On my birthday in 2000 I shot my first elk (cow) with my muzzleloader in southern Colorado. It was about 2 miles from camp-downhill with lots of deadfall and rocks. My younger brother sent me back to camp for the buggy (9am) but forgot to mention how to get there and I thought I knew. It didnhttp://forums.gunsandammo.com/images/smilies/rolleyes5.gift take long to realize I was lost. I didn't panic since we were on a plateau and there was a fence pretty well around the whole place. It took a couple hours to find the fence and get back to camp. I headed back to kill sight - no problem getting back. About the time we started back with elk, I ran out of gas. I had lived in Louisiana all my life and we were now at 12,000 feet - oxygen depravation set in. I could hardly walk much less help with the elk. Fortunately our other hunting partner showed up and help my brother get the elk back to camp - they beat me as I had to stop every 50 yards to breathe! Learned several lessons that day 1. don't get lost 2. shoot elk closer to camp!

    A unique retrieve was on a swamp rabbit while wood duck hunting down a slough. He jumped and ran in front of me and I shot at him. He ran into a briar patch and I wasn't sure I had hit him. I did find a little piece of fur and some blood spots (can you tracking a rabbit?) that led into the big briar patch. I love fried swamp rabbit so I proceeded on my hands and knees under the briars. Fortunately the carhart jacket was tough and allowed me to get through the briars albeit at a slow pace. After 50 yards or so I found the rabbit - dead with one #6 shot in his lungs. Had a great feast and good memory.

    Congratulations on having the determination and Balls to crawl in a briar patch for a Rabbit. I don't know what part of the country you were in, but I doubt if it was like around here. I wouldn't do it for a 10 point western count elk. You might end up kissing a rattler or cotton mouth or two or maybe a gator.

    :popcorn:.....:yikes:.....:bang:.....:silly:.....:worthy:.....:tooth:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • big elkbig elk Member Posts: 111 Member
    I was young and dumb. I killed a nice 6 point bull elk down a steep canyon and it took me 4 days for the meet and a 5th for the cape. This was about 30 years ago and will not even look down a canyon now. I still hike a long way back in but I have a friend who has a couple mules that I can use. It usually cost me a couple of bottles of expensive whiskey and a steak dinner, but it's worth it.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    I had to drive the tractor through the snow once.

    Oh you poor dear you!!!

    :rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    :rotflmao::rotflmao::roll2::rotflmao::rotflmao::roll2::rotflmao::rotflmao::roll2::rotflmao:
    bisley wrote: »
    I had it figured out, at about your age. Unfortunately, feeling the need for 'expediency' still trumps common sense, all too often. I still lift things that I should not, because I always have, and because I still can. But there is a price to pay for it, and I usually end up paying more than I intended.

    It's kinda like when you are 20, or so, and have such a monumental hangover that you swear you will never let it happen again. By Friday night, you have forgotten about it, and it takes another couple of years to refuse the temptation on a regular basis. Even then, you may backslide occasionally, for several more years.

    :rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:

    You ain't just whistlin Dixie!!! We need to stop thinkin we're super man and realize we're gettin older. Use our heads, plan ahead!
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement